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Thesis / dissertation formatting manual (2024).

  • Filing Fees and Student Status
  • Submission Process Overview
  • Electronic Thesis Submission
  • Paper Thesis Submission
  • Formatting Overview
  • Fonts/Typeface
  • Pagination, Margins, Spacing
  • Paper Thesis Formatting
  • Preliminary Pages Overview
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication Page

Table of Contents

  • List of Figures (etc.)
  • Acknowledgements
  • Text and References Overview
  • Figures and Illustrations
  • Using Your Own Previously Published Materials
  • Using Copyrighted Materials by Another Author
  • Open Access and Embargoes
  • Copyright and Creative Commons
  • Ordering Print (Bound) Copies
  • Tutorials and Assistance
  • FAQ This link opens in a new window

The Table of Contents should follow these guidelines:

  • ​All sections of the manuscript are listed in the Table of Contents except the Title Page, the Copyright Page, the Dedication Page, and the Table of Contents.
  • You may list subsections within chapters
  • Creative works are not exempt from the requirement to include a Table of Contents

Table of Contents Example

Here is an example of a Table of Contents page from the Template. Please note that your table of contents may be longer than one page.

Screenshot of Table of Contents page from Dissertation template

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Formatting Your Thesis or Dissertation with Microsoft Word

  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication, Acknowledgements, & Preface
  • Headings and Subheadings
  • Citations and Bibliography
  • Page Numbers
  • Tables and Figures
  • Rotated (Landscape) Pages
  • Lists of Tables and Figures
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Some Things to Watch For
  • PDF with Embedded Fonts

Table of contents

If you created your headings and subheadings with styles, and numbered your pages as demonstrated in the Page Numbers tutorial, Microsoft Word can be used to automatically generate a table of contents. Automatic generation of the table of contents has 2 advantages:

  • You don't have to manually type the table of contents. Since the entries in the Table of Content must match exactly the headings, subheadings, and page numbers in the thesis, manually creating a table of contents can lead to unintended errors.
  • You don't have to go back and edit the table of contents if something moves from one page to another. A couple of clicks and Word will automatically update the table of contents for you.

Below is a tutorial demonstrating how to create the table of contents.

Note: You should create the table of contents last to avoid needing to update the table of contents too often.

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  • Next: Lists of Tables and Figures >>
  • Last Updated: Mar 21, 2024 2:35 PM
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Organizing and Formatting Your Thesis and Dissertation

table of contents of a master thesis

Learn about overall organization of your thesis or dissertation. Then, find details for formatting your preliminaries, text, and supplementaries.

Overall Organization

A typical thesis consists of three main parts – preliminaries, text, and supplementaries. Each part is to be organized as explained below and in the order indicated below:

1. Preliminaries:

  • Title page (required)
  • Copyright page (required)
  • Abstract (required) only one abstract allowed
  • Acknowledgments (optional) located in the Preliminary Section only
  • Preface (optional)
  • Autobiography (optional)
  • Dedication (optional)
  • Table of Contents (required)
  • List of Tables (optional)
  • List of Figures (optional)
  • List of Plates (optional)
  • List of Symbols (optional)
  • List of Keywords (optional)
  • Other Preliminaries (optional) such as Definition of Terms

3. Supplementaries:

  • References or bibliography (optional)
  • Appendices (optional)
  • Glossary (optional)
  • List of Abbreviations (optional)

The order of sections is important

Preliminaries

These are the general requirements for all preliminary pages.

  • Preliminary pages are numbered with lower case Roman numerals.
  • Page numbers are ½” from the bottom of the page and centered.
  • The copyright page is included in the manuscript immediately after the title page and is not assigned a page number nor counted.
  • The abstract page is numbered with the Roman numeral “ii”.
  • The remaining preliminary pages are arranged as listed under “Organizing and Formatting the Thesis/Dissertation” and numbered consecutively.
  • Headings for all preliminary pages must be centered in all capital letters 1” from the top of the page.
  • Do not bold the headings of the preliminary pages.

Preliminaries have no page number on the first two. Then it is numbered with roman numerals.

A sample Thesis title page pdf is available here ,  and a sample of a Dissertation title page pdf is available here.

Refer to the sample page as you read through the format requirements for the title page.

  • Do not use bold.
  • Center all text except the advisor and committee information.

The heading “ Thesis ” or “ Dissertation ” is in all capital letters, centered one inch from the top of the page.

  • Your title must be in all capital letters, double spaced and centered.
  • Your title on the title page must match the title on your GS30 – Thesis/Dissertation Submission Form

Submitted by block

Divide this section exactly as shown on the sample page. One blank line must separate each line of text.

  • Submitted by
  • School of Advanced Materials Discovery 
  • School of Biomedical Engineering
  • Graduate Degree Program in Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Graduate Degree Program in Ecology

If your department name begins with “School of”, list as:

  • School of Education
  • School of Music, Theatre and Dance
  • School of Social Work

If you have questions about the correct name of your department or degree, consult your department. Areas of Study or specializations within a program are not listed on the Title Page.

Degree and Graduating Term block

  • In partial fulfillment of the requirements
  • For the Degree of
  • Colorado State University
  • Fort Collins, Colorado (do not abbreviate Colorado)

Committee block

  • Master’s students will use the heading Master’s Committee:
  • Doctoral students will use the heading Doctoral Committee:
  • The Master’s Committee and Doctoral Committee headings begin at the left margin.
  • One blank line separates the committee heading and the advisor section.
  • One blank line separates the advisor and committee section.
  • Advisor and committee member names are indented approximately half an inch from the left margin.
  • Titles before or after the names of your advisor and your members are not permitted (Examples – Dr., Professor, Ph.D.).

Copyright Page

  • A sample copyright page pdf is available here.
  • A copyright page is required.
  • A copyright page is included in the manuscript immediately after the title page.
  • This page is not assigned a number nor counted.
  • Center text vertically and horizontally.
  • A sample abstract page pdf is available here – refer to the sample page as you read through the format requirements for the abstract.
  • Only one abstract is permitted.
  • The heading “ Abstract ” is in all capital letters, centered one inch from the top of the page.
  • Three blank lines (single-spaced) must be between the “ Abstract ” heading and your title.
  • Your title must be in all capital letters and centered.
  • The title must match the title on your Title Page and the GS30 – Thesis/Dissertation Submission Form
  • Three blank lines (single-spaced) must be between the title and your text.
  • The text of your abstract must be double-spaced.
  • The first page of the abstract is numbered with a small Roman numeral ii.

Table of Contents

  • A sample Table of Contents page pdf is available.
  • The heading “ Table of Contents ” is in all capital letters centered one inch from the top of the page.
  • Three blank lines (single-spaced) follow the heading.
  • List all parts of the document (except the title page) and the page numbers on which each part begins.
  • The titles of all parts are worded exactly as they appear in the document.
  • Titles and headings and the page numbers on which they begin are separated by a row of dot leaders.
  • Major headings are aligned flush with the left margin.
  • Page numbers are aligned flush with the right margin.

The text of a thesis features an introduction and several chapters, sections and subsections. Text may also include parenthetical references, footnotes, or references to the bibliography or endnotes.

Any references to journal publications, authors, contributions, etc. on your chapter pages or major heading pages should be listed as a footnote .

Text and Supplementaries use Arabic numbering starting at 1

  • The entire document is 8.5” x 11” (letter) size.
  • Pages may be in landscape position for figures and tables that do not fit in “portrait” position.
  • Choose one type style (font) and font size and use it throughout the text of your thesis. Examples: Times New Roman and Arial.
  • Font sizes should be between 10 point and 12 point.
  • Font color must be black. 
  • Hyperlinked text must be in blue. If you hyperlink more than one line of text, such as the entire table of contents, leave the text black. 
  • Margins are one inch on all sides (top, bottom, left, and right).
  • Always continue the text to the bottom margin except at the end of a chapter.

1 inch Margins

  • Please see preliminary page requirements .
  • Body and references are numbered with Arabic numerals beginning with the first page of text (numbered 1).
  • Page numbers must be centered ½” from the bottom of the page.

Major Headings

  • A sample page pdf for major headings and subheadings is available here.
  • Use consistent style for major headings.
  • Three blank lines (single-spaced) need to be between the major heading and your text.
  • Each chapter is started on a new page.
  • The References or Bibliography heading is a major heading and the formatting needs to match chapter headings.

Subheadings

  • A sample page pdf for major headings and subheadings is available here .
  • Style for subheadings is optional but the style should be consistent throughout.
  • Subheadings within a chapter (or section) do not begin on a new page unless the preceding page is filled. Continue the text to the bottom of the page unless at the end of a chapter.
  • Subheadings at the bottom of a page require two lines of text following the heading and at least two lines of text on the next page.

Running Head

Do not insert a running head.

When dividing paragraphs, at least two lines of text should appear at the bottom of the page and at least two lines of text on the next page.

Hyphenation

The last word on a page may not be divided. No more than three lines in succession may end with hyphens. Divide words as indicated in a standard dictionary.

  • The text of the thesis is double-spaced.
  • Bibliography or list of reference entries and data within large tables may be single-spaced. Footnotes should be single spaced.
  • Footnotes and bibliography or list of reference entries are separated by double-spacing.
  • Quoted material of more than three lines is indented and single-spaced. Quoted material that is three lines or fewer may be single-spaced for emphasis.

Poems should be double-spaced with triple-spacing between stanzas. Stanzas may be centered if lines are short.

  • Consult a style manual approved by your department for samples of footnotes.
  • Footnotes are numbered consecutively throughout the entire thesis.
  • Footnotes appear at the bottom of the page on which the reference is made.
  • Footnotes are single-spaced.
  • Consult a style manual approved by your department for samples of endnotes.
  • Endnotes are numbered consecutively throughout the entire thesis.
  • Endnotes may be placed at the end of each chapter or following the last page of text.
  • The form for an endnote is the same as a footnote. Type the heading “endnote”.

Tables and Figures

  • Tables and figures should follow immediately after first mentioned in the text or on the next page.
  • If they are placed on the next page, continue the text to the bottom of the preceding page.
  • Do not wrap text around tables or figures. Text can go above and/or below.
  • If more clarity is provided by placing tables and figures at the end of chapters or at the end of the text, this format is also acceptable.
  • Tables and Figures are placed before references.
  • Any diagram, drawing, graph, chart, map, photograph, or other type of illustration is presented in the thesis as a figure.
  • All tables and figures must conform to margin requirements.
  • Images can be resized to fit within margins
  • Table captions go above tables.
  • Figure captions go below figures.
  • Captions must be single spaced.

Landscape Tables and Figures

  • Large tables or figures can be placed on the page landscape or broadside orientation.
  • Landscape tables and figures should face the right margin (unbound side).
  • The top margin must be the same as on a regular page.
  • Page numbers for landscape or broadside tables or figures are placed on the 11” side.

Supplementaries

These are the general requirements for all supplementary pages.

  • Supplementary pages are arranged as listed under “Organizing and Formatting the Thesis/Dissertation” and numbered consecutively.
  • Headings for all supplementary pages are major headings and the formatting style needs to match chapter headings.

Arabic numbers continue into the supplementaries.

References or Bibliography

  • The References or Bibliography heading is always a major heading and the formatting style needs to match chapter headings.
  • References or Bibliography are ordered after each chapter, or at the end of the text.
  • References or Bibliography must start on a new page from the chapter text.
  • References are aligned flush with the left margin.
  • The style for references should follow the format appropriate for the field of study.
  • The style used must be consistent throughout the thesis.
  • Appendices are optional and used for supplementary material.
  • The Appendices heading is a major heading and the formatting style needs to match chapter headings.
  • As an option the appendix may be introduced with a cover page bearing only the title centered vertically and horizontally on the page. The content of the appendix then begins on the second page with the standard one inch top margin.
  • Quality and format should be consistent with requirements for other parts of the thesis including margins.
  • Page numbers used in the appendix must continue from the main text.

A Foreign Language Thesis

Occasionally, theses are written in languages other than English. In such cases, an English translation of the title and abstract must be included in the document.

  • Submit one title page in the non-English language (no page number printed).
  • Submit one title page in English (no page number printed).
  • Submit one abstract in the non-English language (page number is ii).
  • Submit one abstract in English (page number is numbered consecutively from previous page – example: if the last page of the abstract in the foreign language is page ii the first page of the abstract in English is numbered page iii).

Multipart Thesis

In some departments, a student may do research on two or more generally related areas which would be difficult to combine into a single well-organized thesis. The solution is the multi-part thesis.

  • Each part is considered a separate unit, with its own chapters, bibliography or list of references, and appendix (optional); or it may have a combined bibliography or list of references and appendix.
  • A single abstract is required.
  • The pages of a multi-part thesis are numbered consecutively throughout the entire thesis, not through each part (therefore, the first page of Part II is not page 1).
  • The chapter numbering begins with Chapter 1 for each part, or the chapters may be numbered consecutively.
  • Pagination is consecutive throughout all parts, including numbered separation sheets between parts.
  • Each part may be preceded by a separation sheet listing the appropriate number and title.
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Office of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation Formatting Guidelines

These rules are taken from the KU Office of Graduate Studies Thesis or Dissertation Formatting Guidelines. To see the full thesis or dissertation formatting requirements, visit https://graduate.ku.edu/submitting

Creating an Automated Table of Contents

Located in the Home tab, Word’s Style Gallery makes it easy to set consistent, one-click formatting for headings throughout your document. It is these style settings that Word uses to create an automatic table of contents. Using an automatic table of contents will save you the huge headache of dealing with dot leaders, spacing, and having to completely re-type your table of contents if the order of your pages changes even a little. Plus, styles are easy to use! Step-by-step how-to instructions are included below for setting heading styles and then inserting a table of contents in Word 2010, Word 2013 or Word 2011 for Mac.

  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2010)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2013)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2011 for Mac)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2016 Mac)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2016 PC)
  • Creating a Manual-Entry Table of Contents

Working with Outline Style (Numbered) Headings

Numbered headings can be very tricky and many citation styles do not require their use. If you are working with a style the does require it, however, Shauna Kelly's blog has some great help .

Subject Guide

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How to create a table of contents for a dissertation (apa), published by steve tippins on june 20, 2022 june 20, 2022.

Last Updated on: 2nd February 2024, 05:06 am

table of contents of a master thesis

APA Dissertation Table of Contents Format Guidelines

  • The table of contents should be double spaced with one-inch margins on all sides. 
  • It should be written in the same font and size as the rest of your dissertation.  
  • At the top of the page, write Table of Contents , centered and in bold.
  • Although in the body of the paper you can use up to five levels of headings, up to three levels are usually provided in the Table of Contents. Including lower-level headings is optional. 
  • Indent each subheading five spaces. 
  • Write all text in title case. In title case, the first letter of major words is capitalized.
  • Provide the page number where the main headings and subheadings begin, and provide dotted lines between the heading and the page number.
  • Page numbers for the Dedication, Acknowledgements, and Preface should be in lower case Roman Numbers (i, v, x, l, c, d and m.). The page numbers for the rest of the text should be in Arabic numerals (1,2, 3, 4, etc.).

How to Create an APA Table of Contents Using Microsoft Word

Step 1. Instead of manually trying to write and format the table of contents, you can create a generated one using Microsoft Word. To do this, first go to the Home tab. This is where you will choose the styles for the table of contents. 

Step 2. The top-level headings will be your chapter titles, so on the right side of the tab, apply the Heading 1 style. 

Step 3. The second-level headings will be your subheadings, so apply the Heading 2 style. This will place your subheadings underneath your main headings.

screenshot of formatting a heading in Microsoft word

Step 4. You will now produce page links to your document. In the top ribbon, click on the References tab and select Table of Contents . 

table of contents of a master thesis

Step 5. If the style does not indicate APA, such as the one below, use the drop down arrow to select APA. 

Step 6. Next, choose the number of levels that you want. In this case, you want to be able to have up to three levels, so choose Automatic Table 2 , which has the appropriate heading for a dissertation. 

Step 7. Click ok , and you are all set. Microsoft word will automatically generate your dissertation’s table of contents as you write it.

screenshot of table of content formatting in microsoft word

List of Tables and Figures

Your list of tables and figures will be written at the end of the list of information in the body of your paper. You will create these lists the same way that you created the main table of contents. 

However, the headings will be different. 

Instead of the heading “Table of Contents,” the headings will be “List of Tables” and “List of Figures.” (An example is provided in the table of contents example below.)

Example of Table of Contents

In the example below, there are three level headings. The list of tables and figures are provided at the bottom of the other contents. The sections in your table of contents may be different depending on your college’s requirements. 

screenshot of APA Dissertation Table of Contents formatting

Updating the Table of Contents

As you continue working on your dissertation, you will need to update the page numbers because they may change. 

table of contents of a master thesis

To update the page numbers, right-click on the table of contents in your document and select the Update field . Then, the Update Table of Contents box will appear. 

You can choose to Update page numbers only or all the information in the table of contents by clicking on Update entire table . 

screenshot of updating page numbers in microsoft word

Note: For more information, refer to the APA Manual 7 th edition , sections 2.2-2.27.

Steve Tippins

Steve Tippins, PhD, has thrived in academia for over thirty years. He continues to love teaching in addition to coaching recent PhD graduates as well as students writing their dissertations. Learn more about his dissertation coaching and career coaching services. Book a Free Consultation with Steve Tippins

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Formatting Requirements

Table of contents, what to include.

  • the abstract
  • the lay summary
  • the preface
  • the table of contents
  • all other preliminary pages
  • the main divisions and subdivisions of the thesis
  • the bibliography
  • the appendices

Tables, figures, illustrations and appendices must be listed by number and title, and must include a page number.

Formatting requirements

  • single page-wide column
  • page numbers right-aligned
  • leader lines (dots) connecting the entries with their page numbers
  • page number for each entry
  • entries in the order given on this web site
  • do not put "page" in front of the page number
  • subheadings indented more than main headings, third-level headings indented more than subheadings, etc.

Sample table of contents

  • Why Grad School at UBC?
  • Graduate Degree Programs
  • Application & Admission
  • Info Sessions
  • Research Supervisors
  • Research Projects
  • Indigenous Students
  • International Students
  • Tuition, Fees & Cost of Living
  • Newly Admitted
  • Student Status & Classification
  • Student Responsibilities
  • Supervision & Advising
  • Managing your Program
  • Health, Wellbeing and Safety
  • Professional Development
  • Final Doctoral Exam
  • Final Dissertation & Thesis Submission
  • Life in Vancouver
  • Vancouver Campus
  • Graduate Student Spaces
  • Graduate Life Centre
  • Life as a Grad Student
  • Graduate Student Ambassadors
  • Meet our Students
  • Award Opportunities
  • Award Guidelines
  • Minimum Funding Policy for PhD Students
  • Killam Awards & Fellowships
  • Policies & Procedures
  • Information for Supervisors
  • Dean's Message
  • Leadership Team
  • Strategic Plan & Priorities
  • Vision & Mission
  • Equity, Diversity & Inclusion
  • Initiatives, Plans & Reports
  • Graduate Education Analysis & Research
  • Media Enquiries
  • Newsletters
  • Giving to Graduate Studies

Strategic Priorities

  • Strategic Plan 2019-2024
  • Improving Student Funding
  • Promoting Excellence in Graduate Programs
  • Enhancing Graduate Supervision
  • Advancing Indigenous Inclusion
  • Supporting Student Development and Success
  • Reimagining Graduate Education
  • Enriching the Student Experience

Initiatives

  • Public Scholars Initiative
  • 3 Minute Thesis (3MT)
  • PhD Career Outcomes
  • Great Supervisor Week
  • How it works

How to Create the Best Table of Contents for a Dissertation

Published by Owen Ingram at August 12th, 2021 , Revised On September 20, 2023

“A table of contents is an essential part of any article, book, proceedings, essay , and paper with plenty of information. It requires providing the reader’s guidance about the position of the content.”

When preparing a  dissertation , you may cram as much information into it as appropriate. The dissertation may be an extremely well-written one with a lot of valuable information to offer. Still, all that information could become perplexing if the reader cannot easily find the information.

The length of dissertations usually varies from a few pages to a few hundred pages, making it very difficult to find information that you may be after.

Instead of skimming through every page of the dissertation, there is a need for a guideline that directs the reader to the correct section of the dissertation and, more importantly, the correct page in the section.

Also read:   The List of Figures and Tables in the Dissertation .

What is the Table of Contents in the Dissertation?

The table of contents is the section of a dissertation that guides each section of the dissertation paper’s contents.

Depending on the detail level in a table of contents, the most useful headings are listed to provide the reader concerning which page the said information may be found.

The table of contents is essentially a list found at the beginning of a  dissertation , which contains names of the chapters, section titles and/or very brief descriptions, and page numbers indicated for each.

This allows the reader to look at the table of contents to locate the information needed from the dissertation. Having an effective table of contents is key to providing a seamless reading experience to the reader.

Here in this article, we will uncover every piece of information you need to know to write the dissertation’s abstract.

This article helps the readers on how to create the best table of contents for the dissertation. An important thing to note is that this guide discusses creating a table of contents in Microsoft Word.

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Styles for Dissertation Table of Contents

Making an effective table of contents starts with identifying headings and designating styles to those headings.

Using heading styles to format your headings can save a lot of time by automatically converting their formatting to the defined style and serves as a tool to identify the heading and its level, used later when creating a thesis table of contents .

Each heading style already has predefined sizes, fonts, colours, spacing, etc. but can be changed as per the user’s requirements. This also helps once all headings have been created and you intend to change the style of a certain type of heading.

All that is needed to change the style of a type of heading is automatically reflected on all headings that use the style.

Below is how the styles menu looks like;

Style-menus

To allocate a style to a heading, first select a heading and then click on one of the styles in the ‘Styles’ menu. Doing so converts the selected heading to the style that is selected in the Styles menu.

You can style a similar heading level in the same style by selecting each heading and then clicking on the style in the Style menu.

It is important to note that it greatly helps and saves time if you allocate styles systematically, i.e., you allocate the style as you write.

The styles are not limited to headings only but can be used for paragraphs and by selecting the whole paragraph and applying a style to it.

Changing Appearance of Pre-Defined Styles

To change the appearance of a style to one that suits you,

  • You would need to right-click on one of the styles to open a drop-down menu.

Changing-Apperance-of-Predefined-Styles

  • Select ‘Modify’ from the menu. This would display a window with various formatting and appearance options. You can select the most appropriate ones and click ‘OK.’ The change that you made to the style reflects on all headings or paragraphs that use this style.

Changing-Apperance-of-Predefined-Styles

Further changes can be made to headings, but using styles is an important step for creating the table of contents for the thesis. Once this step is completed, you can continue to create a thesis table of contents.

Also Read:  What is Appendix in Dissertation?

Things to Consider when Making APA Style Table of Contents

  • The pages before the body of the dissertation, known as the ‘Prefatory Pages,’ should not have page numbers on them but should be numbered in the Roman Numerals instead as (i, ii, iii…).
  • Table of Contents and the Abstract pages are not to contain any numbers.
  • The remaining pages would carry the standard page numbers (1,2,3…).
  • The section titles and page numbers in the dissertation table of contents should have dotted lines between them.
  • All the Prefatory pages, Sections, Chapter Titles, Headings, Sub Headings, Reference Sections, and Appendices should be listed in the contents’ thesis table. If there are a limited number of Tables or Figures, they may be listed in the dissertation’s table contents.
  • If there are many figures, tables, symbols, or abbreviations, a List of Tables, List of Figures , List of Symbols, and List of Abbreviations should be made for easy navigation. These lists, however, should not be listed in the thesis table of contents.
  • The thesis/dissertation must be divided into sections even if it is not divided into chapters, with all sections being listed in the table of contents for the thesis.

Generating Dissertation Table of Contents

First, to generate the Table of Contents, start by entering a blank page after the pages you need the table of contents to follow.

  • To do so, click on the bottom of the page you want before the Table of Contents.
  • Open the ‘Insert’ tab and select ‘Page Break’.
  • This will create a page between the top and bottom sections of the Table of Contents area.

Generating-Table-of-Contents-for-Your-Dissertation

By the time you reach this section, you would have given each heading or sub-heading a dedicated style, distinguishing between different types of headings. Microsoft Word can automatically generate a Table of Contents, but the document, particularly the headings, needs to be formatted according to styles for this feature to work. You can assign different headings levels, different styles for Microsoft Word to recognize the level of heading.

How to Insert Table of Contents

  • Place the cursor where you want to place the Table of Contents on the page you added earlier.
  • On the ‘References’ tab, open the Table of Contents group. This would open a list of different Table of Contents designs and a  table of contents sample.

Inserting-Table-of-Contents

  • You can select an option from the available Table of Contents or make a Custom Table of Contents. Although the available Table of Contents samples is appropriate, you may use a custom table of contents if it is more suitable to your needs. This allows you to modify different formatting options for the Table of Contents to satisfy your own

Inserting-Table-of-Contents-1

Updating the Table of Contents

As you proceed with editing your dissertation, the changes cause the page numbers and headings to vary. Often, people fail to incorporate those changes into the Table of Contents, which then effectively serves as an incorrect table and causes confusion.

It is thus important to update the changes into the table of contents as the final step once you have made all the necessary changes in the dissertation and are ready to print it.

These changes may alter the length of the  thesis table of contents , which may also cause the dissertation’s formatting to be altered a little, so it is best to reformat it after updating the table of contents.

To update the table of contents,

  • Select ‘Update Table’ in the References tab.
  • This would open a dialogue box. Select ‘Update Entire Table’ to ensure that all changes are reflected in the contents table and not just the page numbers. This would display all changes and additions you have made to the document (Anon., 2017).

Using this guide, you should understand how to create the best table of contents for the dissertation. The use of a Table of Contents, while being important for most written work, is even more critical for dissertations, especially when the proper methodology of creating the table of contents is followed.

This includes the guidelines that must be considered to correctly format the table of contents so that it may be shaped so that it follows the norms and is effective at helping the reader navigate through the content of the dissertation.

The use of Microsoft Word’s Table of Contents generation feature has greatly helped people worldwide create, edit, and update the table of contents of their dissertations with ease.

Here in this article, we will uncover every piece of information you need to know  how to write the dissertation’s abstract .

Are you in need of help with dissertation writing? At ResearchProspect, we have hundreds of Master’s and PhD qualified writers for all academic subjects, so you can get help with any aspect of your dissertation project. You can place your order for a proposal ,  full dissertation paper , or  individual chapters .

Is it essential to add a table of content to the dissertation?

Yes, it is important to add a table of content in a dissertation .

How to make an effective table of contents for the dissertation?

Using heading styles to format your headings can save a lot of time by automatically converting their formatting to the defined style and serves as a tool to identify the heading and its level, used later when creating a thesis table of contents.

How do I update the table of contents?

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Not sure how to write dissertation title page? All dissertations must have a dissertation title page where necessary information should be clearly presented

Your dissertation introduction chapter provides detailed information on the research problem, significance of research, and research aim & objectives.

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  • Dissertation Table of Contents in Word | Instructions & Examples

Dissertation Table of Contents in Word | Instructions & Examples

Published on 15 May 2022 by Tegan George .

The table of contents is where you list the chapters and major sections of your thesis, dissertation, or research paper, alongside their page numbers. A clear and well-formatted table of contents is essential, as it demonstrates to your reader that a quality paper will follow.

The table of contents (TOC) should be placed between the abstract and the introduction. The maximum length should be two pages. Depending on the nature of your thesis, dissertation, or paper, there are a few formatting options you can choose from.

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Table of contents

What to include in your table of contents, what not to include in your table of contents, creating a table of contents in microsoft word, table of contents examples, updating a table of contents in microsoft word, other lists in your thesis, dissertation, or research paper, frequently asked questions about the table of contents.

Depending on the length of your document, you can choose between a single-level, subdivided, or multi-level table of contents.

  • A single-level table of contents only includes ‘level 1’ headings, or chapters. This is the simplest option, but it may be too broad for a long document like a dissertation.
  • A subdivided table of contents includes chapters as well as ‘level 2’ headings, or sections. These show your reader what each chapter contains.
  • A multi-level table of contents also further divides sections into ‘level 3’ headings. This option can get messy quickly, so proceed with caution. Remember your table of contents should not be longer than 2 pages. A multi-level table is often a good choice for a shorter document like a research paper.

Examples of level 1 headings are Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology, and Bibliography. Subsections of each of these would be level 2 headings, further describing the contents of each chapter or large section. Any further subsections would be level 3.

In these introductory sections, less is often more. As you decide which sections to include, narrow it down to only the most essential.

Including appendices and tables

You should include all appendices in your table of contents. Whether or not you include tables and figures depends largely on how many there are in your document.

If there are more than three figures and tables, you might consider listing them on a separate page. Otherwise, you can include each one in the table of contents.

  • Theses and dissertations often have a separate list of figures and tables.
  • Research papers generally don’t have a separate list of figures and tables.

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All level 1 and level 2 headings should be included in your table of contents, with level 3 headings used very sparingly.

The following things should never be included in a table of contents:

  • Your acknowledgements page
  • Your abstract
  • The table of contents itself

The acknowledgements and abstract always precede the table of contents, so there’s no need to include them. This goes for any sections that precede the table of contents.

To automatically insert a table of contents in Microsoft Word, be sure to first apply the correct heading styles throughout the document, as shown below.

  • Choose which headings are heading 1 and which are heading 2 (or 3!
  • For example, if all level 1 headings should be Times New Roman, 12-point font, and bold, add this formatting to the first level 1 heading.
  • Highlight the level 1 heading.
  • Right-click the style that says ‘Heading 1’.
  • Select ‘Update Heading 1 to Match Selection’.
  • Allocate the formatting for each heading throughout your document by highlighting the heading in question and clicking the style you wish to apply.

Once that’s all set, follow these steps:

  • Add a title to your table of contents. Be sure to check if your citation style or university has guidelines for this.
  • Place your cursor where you would like your table of contents to go.
  • In the ‘References’ section at the top, locate the Table of Contents group.
  • Here, you can select which levels of headings you would like to include. You can also make manual adjustments to each level by clicking the Modify button.
  • When you are ready to insert the table of contents, click ‘OK’ and it will be automatically generated, as shown below.

The key features of a table of contents are:

  • Clear headings and subheadings
  • Corresponding page numbers

Check with your educational institution to see if they have any specific formatting or design requirements.

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Write yourself a reminder to update your table of contents as one of your final tasks before submitting your dissertation or paper. It’s normal for your text to shift a bit as you input your final edits, and it’s crucial that your page numbers correspond correctly.

It’s easy to update your page numbers automatically in Microsoft Word. Simply right-click the table of contents and select ‘Update Field’. You can choose either to update page numbers only or to update all information in your table of contents.

In addition to a table of contents, you might also want to include a list of figures and tables, a list of abbreviations and a glossary in your thesis or dissertation. You can use the following guides to do so:

  • List of figures and tables
  • List of abbreviations

It is less common to include these lists in a research paper.

All level 1 and 2 headings should be included in your table of contents . That means the titles of your chapters and the main sections within them.

The contents should also include all appendices and the lists of tables and figures, if applicable, as well as your reference list .

Do not include the acknowledgements or abstract   in the table of contents.

To automatically insert a table of contents in Microsoft Word, follow these steps:

  • Apply heading styles throughout the document.
  • In the references section in the ribbon, locate the Table of Contents group.
  • Click the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon and select Custom Table of Contents.
  • Select which levels of headings you would like to include in the table of contents.

Make sure to update your table of contents if you move text or change headings. To update, simply right click and select Update Field.

The table of contents in a thesis or dissertation always goes between your abstract and your introduction.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the ‘Cite this Scribbr article’ button to automatically add the citation to our free Reference Generator.

George, T. (2022, May 15). Dissertation Table of Contents in Word | Instructions & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved 2 April 2024, from https://www.scribbr.co.uk/thesis-dissertation/contents-page/

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Home » Table of Contents – Types, Formats, Examples

Table of Contents – Types, Formats, Examples

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Definition:

Table of contents (TOC) is a list of the headings or sections in a document or book, arranged in the order in which they appear. It serves as a roadmap or guide to the contents of the document, allowing readers to quickly find specific information they are looking for.

A typical table of contents includes chapter titles, section headings, subheadings, and their corresponding page numbers.

The table of contents is usually located at the beginning of the document or book, after the title page and any front matter, such as a preface or introduction.

Table of Contents in Research

In Research, A Table of Contents (TOC) is a structured list of the main sections or chapters of a research paper , Thesis and Dissertation . It provides readers with an overview of the organization and structure of the document, allowing them to quickly locate specific information and navigate through the document.

Importance of Table of Contents

Here are some reasons why a TOC is important:

  • Navigation : It serves as a roadmap that helps readers navigate the document easily. By providing a clear and concise overview of the contents, readers can quickly locate the section they need to read without having to search through the entire document.
  • Organization : A well-structured TOC reflects the organization of the document. It helps to organize the content logically and categorize it into easily digestible chunks, which makes it easier for readers to understand and follow.
  • Clarity : It can help to clarify the document’s purpose, scope, and structure. It provides an overview of the document’s main topics and subtopics, which can help readers to understand the content’s overall message.
  • Efficiency : This can save readers time and effort by allowing them to skip to the section they need to read, rather than having to go through the entire document.
  • Professionalism : Including a Table of Contents in a document shows that the author has taken the time and effort to organize the content properly. It adds a level of professionalism and credibility to the document.

Types of Table of Contents

There are different types of table of contents depending on the purpose and structure of the document. Here are some examples:

Simple Table of Contents

This is a basic table of contents that lists the major sections or chapters of a document along with their corresponding page numbers.

Example: Table of Contents

I. Introduction …………………………………………. 1

II. Literature Review ………………………………… 3

III. Methodology ……………………………………… 6

IV. Results …………………………………………….. 9

V. Discussion …………………………………………. 12

VI. Conclusion ……………………………………….. 15

Expanded Table of Contents

This type of table of contents provides more detailed information about the contents of each section or chapter, including subsections and subheadings.

A. Background …………………………………….. 1

B. Problem Statement ………………………….. 2

C. Research Questions ……………………….. 3

II. Literature Review ………………………………… 5

A. Theoretical Framework …………………… 5

B. Previous Research ………………………….. 6

C. Gaps and Limitations ……………………… 8 I

II. Methodology ……………………………………… 11

A. Research Design ……………………………. 11

B. Data Collection …………………………….. 12

C. Data Analysis ……………………………….. 13

IV. Results …………………………………………….. 15

A. Descriptive Statistics ……………………… 15

B. Hypothesis Testing …………………………. 17

V. Discussion …………………………………………. 20

A. Interpretation of Findings ……………… 20

B. Implications for Practice ………………… 22

VI. Conclusion ……………………………………….. 25

A. Summary of Findings ……………………… 25

B. Contributions and Recommendations ….. 27

Graphic Table of Contents

This type of table of contents uses visual aids, such as icons or images, to represent the different sections or chapters of a document.

I. Introduction …………………………………………. [image of a light bulb]

II. Literature Review ………………………………… [image of a book]

III. Methodology ……………………………………… [image of a microscope]

IV. Results …………………………………………….. [image of a graph]

V. Discussion …………………………………………. [image of a conversation bubble]

Alphabetical Table of Contents

This type of table of contents lists the different topics or keywords in alphabetical order, along with their corresponding page numbers.

A. Abstract ……………………………………………… 1

B. Background …………………………………………. 3

C. Conclusion …………………………………………. 10

D. Data Analysis …………………………………….. 8

E. Ethics ……………………………………………….. 6

F. Findings ……………………………………………… 7

G. Introduction ……………………………………….. 1

H. Hypothesis ………………………………………….. 5

I. Literature Review ………………………………… 2

J. Methodology ……………………………………… 4

K. Limitations …………………………………………. 9

L. Results ………………………………………………… 7

M. Discussion …………………………………………. 10

Hierarchical Table of Contents

This type of table of contents displays the different levels of headings and subheadings in a hierarchical order, indicating the relative importance and relationship between the different sections.

    A. Background …………………………………….. 2

      B. Purpose of the Study ……………………….. 3

      A. Theoretical Framework …………………… 5

             1. Concept A ……………………………….. 6

                    a. Definition ………………………….. 6

                     b. Example ……………………………. 7

              2. Concept B ……………………………….. 8

       B. Previous Research ………………………….. 9

III. Methodology ……………………………………… 12

       A. Research Design ……………………………. 12

             1. Sample ……………………………………. 13

               2. Procedure ………………………………. 14

       B. Data Collection …………………………….. 15

            1. Instrumentation ……………………….. 16

            2. Validity and Reliability ………………. 17

       C. Data Analysis ……………………………….. 18

          1. Descriptive Statistics …………………… 19

           2. Inferential Statistics ………………….. 20

IV. Result s …………………………………………….. 22

    A. Overview of Findings ……………………… 22

B. Hypothesis Testing …………………………. 23

V. Discussion …………………………………………. 26

A. Interpretation of Findings ………………… 26

B. Implications for Practice ………………… 28

VI. Conclusion ……………………………………….. 31

A. Summary of Findings ……………………… 31

B. Contributions and Recommendations ….. 33

Table of Contents Format

Here’s an example format for a Table of Contents:

I. Introduction

C. Methodology

II. Background

A. Historical Context

B. Literature Review

III. Methodology

A. Research Design

B. Data Collection

C. Data Analysis

IV. Results

A. Descriptive Statistics

B. Inferential Statistics

C. Qualitative Findings

V. Discussion

A. Interpretation of Results

B. Implications for Practice

C. Limitations and Future Research

VI. Conclusion

A. Summary of Findings

B. Contributions to the Field

C. Final Remarks

VII. References

VIII. Appendices

Note : This is just an example format and can vary depending on the type of document or research paper you are writing.

When to use Table of Contents

A TOC can be particularly useful in the following cases:

  • Lengthy documents : If the document is lengthy, with several sections and subsections, a Table of contents can help readers quickly navigate the document and find the relevant information.
  • Complex documents: If the document is complex, with multiple topics or themes, a TOC can help readers understand the relationships between the different sections and how they are connected.
  • Technical documents: If the document is technical, with a lot of jargon or specialized terminology, This can help readers understand the organization of the document and locate the information they need.
  • Legal documents: If the document is a legal document, such as a contract or a legal brief, It helps readers quickly locate specific sections or provisions.

How to Make a Table of Contents

Here are the steps to create a table of contents:

  • Organize your document: Before you start making a table of contents, organize your document into sections and subsections. Each section should have a clear and descriptive heading that summarizes the content.
  • Add heading styles : Use the heading styles in your word processor to format the headings in your document. The heading styles are usually named Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3, and so on. Apply the appropriate heading style to each section heading in your document.
  • Insert a table of contents: Once you’ve added headings to your document, you can insert a table of contents. In Microsoft Word, go to the References tab, click on Table of Contents, and choose a style from the list. The table of contents will be inserted into your document.
  • Update the table of contents: If you make changes to your document, such as adding or deleting sections, you’ll need to update the table of contents. In Microsoft Word, right-click on the table of contents and select Update Field. Choose whether you want to update the page numbers or the entire table, and click OK.

Purpose of Table of Contents

A table of contents (TOC) serves several purposes, including:

  • Marketing : It can be used as a marketing tool to entice readers to read a book or document. By highlighting the most interesting or compelling sections, a TOC can give readers a preview of what’s to come and encourage them to dive deeper into the content.
  • Accessibility : A TOC can make a document or book more accessible to people with disabilities, such as those who use screen readers or other assistive technologies. By providing a clear and organized overview of the content, a TOC can help these readers navigate the material more easily.
  • Collaboration : This can be used as a collaboration tool to help multiple authors or editors work together on a document or book. By providing a shared framework for organizing the content, a TOC can help ensure that everyone is on the same page and working towards the same goals.
  • Reference : It can serve as a reference tool for readers who need to revisit specific sections of a document or book. By providing a clear overview of the content and organization, a TOC can help readers quickly locate the information they need, even if they don’t remember exactly where it was located.

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Typical Structure of a Bachelor's or Master's Thesis

Most thesis are structured as shown below. Each part may be split into several chapter. For example, the part introduction may have two separate chapters for a the general introduction to the topic and the research question. But the parts commonly appear in the following order:

  • Acknowledgement (Optional)

Table of Contents

1. introduction, 2. literature review, 3. data collection, 4. analysis, 5. conclusions, list of references, statement of independent work.

  • Appendix (Optional)

TUM provides a template for theses that is recommended to use. You can download this template in Word or LaTeX format (login with your TUM account required to access).

There is no mandatory length of a thesis. Most well-written master's theses have between 50 and 80 pages, Bachelor's theses typically have between 40 and 60 pages. However, depending on your topic and your writing style, more or fewer pages may be appropriate. Be aware that your thesis will only be evaluated based on the written document and the defense. If you did some nice work (that you might have shown to your adviser at some point) and forget to add it to your written document, it cannot be evaluated.

table of contents of a master thesis

The title page should include the following information:

  • Technical University of Munich Logo
  • Title of the thesis
  • Subtitle of the thesis (optional)
  • Full author name
  • Name of advisers

It is also nice (but optional) to add a pretty graphic from your research to the title page.

Acknowledgement

In this part, you acknowledge any support you may have gotten while preparing your thesis. For example, if an agency provided you with data, you definitely should thank them here. It is also not uncommon to offer personal thank to friends and/or family who supported the thesis. You may also mention your adviser if (s)he was helpful, but that is optional of course.

If you received a scholarship that supported you during the time you wrote your thesis, you definitely should acknowledge that support here as well.

The summary is a key part of your thesis and part of what is evaluated by your thesis committee. Make sure to reserve sufficient time at the very end to write a very good summary. The summary should be about one page long and include your research question, describe the data you used, briefly describe the methodology applied and (very important) also summarize the results you found.

The table of contents lists all chapters and subchapters of your thesis and provides the page number where each chapter starts. Word and LaTeX offer automated functions to create a table of contents if you defined headers properly. Make sure to update the table of contents before you print to ensure that all page numbers are correct.

Following the table of contents, you also need to provide a list of figures and a list of tables. Likewise, these lists also provide the page number where the figures and tables can be found. Again, word and LaTeX provide automated functions for creating such lists.

The introduction shall provide the reader with an entryway to your topic. Commonly, the introduction is not too technical and provides the reader with a very general introduction why the topic of the thesis is relevant. Empirical examples are particular popular in introductions (make sure to provide citations), such as:

Thesis Topic: Managing Freight Flows to Reduce Highway Maintenance Costs

The first sentence of introduction could be: Freight flows largely define the costs for maintaining infrastructure, as the rear axles of a typical 13 ton van cause 1,000-times the structural damage of a car (Small, Winston, and Evans 1989: 11).

The introduction should also provide at least one research question that you try to answer. Last but not least, the introduction should also introduce the structure of the thesis (i.e., which chapters the reader should expect) in one paragraph.

The literature review is a core element of your thesis and shows that you are capable of working scientifically. As you explain what other researchers have found on your topic, the reader will realize that you know this topic extremely well. This will build trust that you can provide a piece of work yourself that is scientifically relevant.

Equally important, you will need to identify a gap in the literature that you intent to fill. This is how you justify your thesis, and it helps the reader to assess the importance of your work. This gap may be methodological ("I will develop a new method that is able to answer my research question, which previously applied methods cannot as well."), use new data ("Other researchers used database X, but I will use data retrieved by Y."), or a new application ("This method has never been applied to the city of Munich.").

Describe in detail which data you use and how you collect these data. This may include qualitative data ("I analyze these in-depth travel behavior surveys."), or statistics you use, or data you collect yourself. The description should be as detailed that a very good fellow student in your field would be able to more or less reproduce your work.

If you conduct a case study, the study area needs to be introduced here.

Obviously, here you describe in great detail the actual analysis you conducted. The level of detail should be sufficient to allow a very smart fellow student in your field to reproduce more or less your research.

The most important at the beginning: The chapter Conclusions does not contain a summary of your thesis! The summary is provided in the abstract of the beginning of your thesis, but not here.

Instead, the conclusions shall do what the title suggests: Synthesize your findings and conclude what we learn from that. It will be useful to refer to your research question(s) and discuss if those were confirmed or rejected by your research. You may also refer back to you literature review and compare your findings with the findings that others have published.

This is also a good place to talk about limitations of your research. By clearly stating what your research is not able to do well, your thesis becomes stronger. If you show that you understand what your methodology misses, you show the reader that you understand very well what you research has accomplished, and what may need further research.

Which brings us to another topic you should touch on in your conclusions: What are future research needs? If a fellow student of you wanted to build on your research, what would be the next logical step that (s)he should try to address?

Last but not least, you may also assess if your findings have practical implications. Examples: Should waste water engineers use an additional test to assess water quality? Should transportation planners use different data to assess the level of service?

Here you list all references that were cited in your work, and only those references. References you read but did not cite do not appear here. After all, they were not relevant enough for this thesis to be cited, so they do not belong in your list of references.

If you use a reference management system (highly recommended), the list of references is created automatically. LaTeX also nicely integrated with Bibtex to automatically create a list of references. TUM offers Citavi and Endnote for free to students (access here , log in required), and there are a number of other systems that also may work well for you (see this list on wikipedia).

Finally, you need to provide a statement that reads as follows:

In German: Ich versichere hiermit, dass ich die von mir eingereichte Abschlussarbeit selbstständig verfasst und keine anderen als die angegebenen Quellen und Hilfsmittel benutzt habe.

Or in English: I hereby confirm that this thesis was written independently by myself without the use of any sources beyond those cited, and all passages and ideas taken from other sources are cited accordingly.

Appendix (or Appendices)

You may provide additional information in appendices. Some researchers are of the opinion that if something is important it should go into the main body of the thesis; and if it doesn't deserve being in the main body of the thesis, it should not be provided at all. Others say that is may be useful to provide extensive tables, mathematical proofs or series of graphics in the appendix if they are not required to understand the main text but useful for the interested reader.

It is very uncommon to provide a single graphic or a single table in the appendix. Those usually work better in the main body of the text. Commonly, only material that covers several pages would go into the appendix, it it distracts the reader if all those materials were shown in the main body of the thesis.

Extensive appendices may be left out in the printed version and only be provided on a CD or a thumb drive. Note, however, that some advisers refuse to open any files stored on a CD or a thumb drive while evaluating your thesis. As a rule of thumb, your thesis needs to be understandable without reading any appendices.

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How to Create an APA Table of Contents | Format & Examples

Published on November 5, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on January 17, 2024.

A table of contents is not required in an APA Style paper , but if you include one, follow these guidelines:

  • Include all level 1 and level 2 headings (other levels are optional).
  • Indicate different heading levels with indents. Adhere to general APA format in terms of font, spacing, etc.

You can automatically create the table of contents by applying APA heading styles in Word.

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Table of contents

Apa format guidelines for the table of contents, how to generate a table of contents in word.

In a thesis or dissertation , the table of contents comes between your abstract and your introduction . It should be written in the same font and size as the rest of your text (usually 12 pt Times New Roman). At the top of the page, write Contents , centered and in bold.

In APA Style, you can use up to five levels of heading , each with its own formatting style. In the table of contents, you should include all level 1 and 2 headings, left-aligned and formatted as plain text. Level 2 headings are indented.

Including lower-level headings in the table of contents is optional. Add an additional indent for each level. If you have a lot of headings in your text, you may not be able to include them all—your table of contents should not be more than two pages long in total.

APA table of contents

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To automatically generate a table of contents in Word, you’ll first have to apply heading styles throughout your text. After that, you can generate the table of contents.

Applying heading styles

First, go through your text making sure that each level of heading is in keeping with APA Style rules.

Next, update the heading styles listed in the Home tab at the top:

  • Highlight a level 1 heading
  • Right-click the Heading 1 style and select Update Heading 1 to match selection
  • Do the same for each level of heading

Once you’ve done this you can update any other headings quickly using the heading styles. Make sure all headings are in the appropriate style before proceeding.

Generating the table of contents

Now you can generate your table of contents. First write the title “Contents” (in the style of a level 1 heading). Then place your cursor two lines below this and go to the References tab.

Click on Table of Contents and select Custom Table of Contents… In the popup window, select how many levels of heading you wish to include (at least two) under Show levels , then click OK :

Updating your table of contents

Now you have a table of contents based on your current headings and page numbers. If you continue working on your text after this, be sure to go back and update your table of contents at the end, as headings and page numbers might change.

You can do this by right-clicking on the table of contents and selecting Update Field . Then you can choose whether to update all information or just the page numbers. It’s best to update everything, just to be sure.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2024, January 17). How to Create an APA Table of Contents | Format & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved April 2, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/apa-style/apa-table-of-contents/

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How to Create a Table of Contents for Dissertation, Thesis or Paper & Examples

Dissertation Table of Contents

Table of contents

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A dissertation table of contents is a list of the chapters and sections included in a dissertation or thesis, along with their page numbers. It helps to navigate the document easily and locate specific information. Each chapter or section should be listed with its corresponding page number. The table of contents should be formatted according to the guidelines of the specific style guide being used, such as APA or MLA.

We would guess that students usually start working on the table of contents at the last minute. It is quite apparent and makes sense, as this is the list of chapters and sections with page locations. Do you think it's easy? 

From our experience, it can be quite tricky to organize everything according to APA, Chicago, or any other academic writing style. In this blog, we will discuss how to write a table of contents for a research paper , thesis or dissertation in Microsoft Word. We will create it together to guide students through the process. 

Also, here you will find examples of table of contents created by thesis writers at StudyCrumb . Let’s go!

What Is a Table of Contents: Definition

It is obvious that the table of contents (TOC) is an essential manuscript part you can’t skip. If you are dealing with a dissertation, thesis or research paper, you need to know how to build it in accordance with academic guidance. This is a detailed roadmap for your work and outlined structure you can follow for a research presentation. 

In case you are working on an essay or report, you may not include the table of contents, as it is a short academic text. But for the research paper, thesis or dissertation, table of contents is essential and required. It is possible to say the same about any Master’s project. It should be located between the dissertation abstract and introduction chapter. In most cases, it is about 2-3 pages long. 

Our expert dissertation writing service prepared a great template that can be used for your work. Make your research formatting easy with ready solutions!

Types of Table of Contents

How to choose which table of contents will fit your research paper, thesis, dissertation, or report best? Make a decision based on your work length. Some academic writing styles, such as APA paper format or MLA style , have specific formatting for this list. 

However, we will outline the most commonly used typology:

  • Single-level table of contents. At this type, we use only chapters. For instance, you will have an Introduction, Literature Review, methodology, and other chapters with page numbers. It can be used for shorter research work. For long writing forms like manuscripts, it can be too broad, and you will need to go into details.
  • Subdivided table of contents. The most frequently used form to organize the contents table. It will include not only chapters but also sections — a level 2 subheading for each part. It will help to be more specific about what to expect in each part of your research work.
  • Table of contents with multiple levels. This is a more divided structure, including subheadings with a level 3 for each section. Quite often, those subheadings can be rewritten or deleted during the last editing. It is essential to keep them in the right order.

Before you decide which type will work best for you, let us share with you some examples of each formatting style.

Example of Table of Contents With a Single Level

Introduction: The Misinformation Roots ………..…… 3 Literature Review .....................................….....………… 10 Research Methodology and Design ……................. 24 Results.............................................................................. 28 Discussion ....................................................................... 32

Sometimes, you will need to put an extra emphasis on subsections. Check this layout to see how your subheadings can be organized.

Example of Table of Contents Page with Subdivided Levels

Introduction: Information War ............……………….. 3       Background…………………………………….………..…… 4       Current State ……………………………………...…...…… 5       Defining Research Questions………………………. 9 Literature Review………………………...……………..……... 11       The Roots of Information Warfare ………....… 11        Information Wars …………………………….………..… 14        Cyber Wars Research ........................................ 17

If you are working on a lengthy, complex paper, this outline will suit your project most. It will help readers navigate through your document by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable sections.

Multi-Level Table of Contents Page Example

Introduction……………………………………………….......……….… 3       Emergence of Climate Change ………..……....….….. 3       Key Activist Groups in Climate Change .............. 5              Greenpeace International ………..…………......... 9              European Climate Foundation …….……………. 10              WWF ……………………………………….……….............. 11        Significant Movements ……………….………....……… 13 Literature Review ……………………………………......…………. 15

What Sections Should Be Included in a Table of Contents?

To start with, the scientific table of contents should include all chapters and its subheading. It is important to choose the formatting that will give your readers a full overview of your work from the very beginning. However, there are other chapters that you may miss constructing the 2-pager table. So, let's look at all you need to include:

  • Dissertation introduction
  • Literature review
  • Research methodology
  • Results section
  • Dissertation discussion
  • Conclusion of a thesis
  • Reference list. Mention a number of a page where you start listing your sources.
  • Appendices. For instance, if you have a data set, table or figure, include it in your research appendix .

This is how the ideal structured dissertation or research paper table of contents will look like. Remember that it still should take 2 pages. You need to choose the best formatting style to manage its length.

Tables, Figures, and Appendices in TOC

While creating a table of contents in a research paper, thesis or dissertation, you will need to include appendices in each case you have them. However, the formatting and adding tables and figures can vary based on the number and citation style. If you have more than 3 tables or figures, you may decide to have all of them at the end of your project. So, add them to the table of contents. 

Figures, graphics, and diagrams in research papers, dissertations and theses should be numbered. If you use them from another source, ensure that you make a proper citation based on the chosen style guide.

Appendix in Table of Contents Example

Appendix A. Row Data Set…………………………………… 41 Appendix B. IBR Data………………………………………….… 43 Appendix C. SPSS Data………………………………………… 44

What Shouldn't Be Included in a Table of Contents?

When creating a dissertation table of contents, students want to include everything they have in a document. However, some components should not be on this page. Here is what we are talking about:

  • Thesis acknowledgement
  • Paper abstract
  • The content list itself

Acknowledgement and abstract should be located before the content list, so there is no need to add them. You need to present a clear structure that will help your readers to navigate through the work and quickly find any requested information.

How to Create a Table of Contents for a Research Paper or Dissertation In Word?

It may look like working with this list can take a long. But we have one proposal for our users. Instead of writing a table of contents manually, create it automatically in Microsoft Word. You do not need any specific tech knowledge to do this. Let’s go through this process step-by-step and explain how to make a table of contents for a research paper or dissertation in a few clicks.

  • Open Home tab and choose the style for your table of contents (ToC next).
  • Apply heading 1 to your chapters, heading 2 to the subheading, and if needed heading 3 to the level 3 heading.
  • Next, you are going to create a research paper or PhD dissertation table of contents. Open References and choose ToC.
  • Choose the citation style for your work. For example, let’s choose APL for now. Meeting all style requirements (bold font, title formatting, numbers) is essential.
  • Define the number of levels for your dissertation or thesis table of contents. In case you want to have 3 levels, choose Automatic Table 2.
  • You are done! Click ok, and here is your page with listed chapters!

You see how easy it can be! Every time you make changes to your text or headings, it will be automatic.

Updating Your Table of Contents in MS Word

Table of contents of a research paper or dissertation is created, and you continue to edit your work until submission. It is common practice, and with MS Word, you can automate all the updates. 

Let’s outline this process in our step-by-step guide!

  • Right-click on your ToC in a document.
  • Update field section is next.
  • Choose “update ToC."
  • Here, you can update your entire ToC — choose an option that works the best for you!

As you may see, working with automated solutions is much easier when you write a dissertation which has manifold subsections. That is why it is better to learn how to work on MS Word with the content list meaning be able to manage it effectively.

Table of Contents Examples

From our experience, students used to think that the content list was quite a complicated part of the work. Even with automated solutions, you must be clear about what to include and how to organize formatting. To solve the problem and answer all your questions, use our research paper or dissertation contents page example. Our paper writers designed a sample table of contents to illustrate the best practices and various styles in formatting the work. 

Check our samples to find advanced options for organizing your own list.

Example of Table of Contents in Research Paper

Research Paper Table of Contents Example

As you can see, this contents page includes sections with different levels.

Thesis/Dissertation Table of Contents Example

Thesis/Dissertation Table of Contents Example

Have a question about your specific case? Check samples first, as we are sure you can get almost all the answers in our guides and sample sets. 

>> Read more: APA Format Table of Contents

Tips on Creating a Table of Contents

To finalize all that we shared on creating the table of contents page, let’s go through our tips list. We outline the best advice to help you with a dissertation table of contents.

  • Use automated solutions for creating a list of chapters for your report, research papers, or dissertations — it will save you time in the future.
  • Be clear with the formatting style you use for the research.
  • Choose the best level type of list based on the paper length.
  • Update a list after making changes to the text.
  • Check the page list before submitting the work.

Bottom Line on Making Table of Contents for Dissertations/ Papers

To summarize, working with a research paper, thesis or dissertation table of contents can be challenging. This article outlines how to create a table of contents in Word and how to update it appropriately. You can learn what to include in the content list, how long it can be, and where to locate it. Write your work using more than one table of contents sample we prepared for students. It is often easy to check how the same list was made for other dissertations before finalizing yours. We encourage you to learn how to create a list with pages automatically and update it. It will definitely make your academic life easier.

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Inhaltsverzeichnis

  • 1  Definition
  • 3 Examples for Your Thesis
  • 4 Master’s Thesis Examples
  • 5  Microsoft Word Tutorial
  • 6 In a Nutshell

 Definition

A table of contents example will help structure a long academic manuscript and a table of contents page is necessary for academic submission. The table of contents contains an organised listing of your manuscript’s chapters and sections with clearly marked (and accurate) page numbers. The aim of the table of contents is to allow the reader to flip easily to the section they require and to get a feel of your argument’s structure.

What comes first, table of contents or abstract?

If you are writing an academic paper, you have to take the order of your paper into account. Usually, the first sections of your thesis are the title page, cover page, acknowledgements and the abstract . After these pages, you place the table of contents. Be sure to check that all of the page numbers in your table of contents are correct.

What variations of table of content examples exist?

The table of contents can be displayed in the following formats:

  • Single level table of contents
  • Subdivided table of contents
  • Multi-level table of contents
  • Academic table of contents

You will find further details about what needs to be included inside of the table of contents on our blog.

Are references included in table of contents?

Yes. The references are included in the table of contents. You add them in as you would any other section of your thesis. Simply write the section in the table of contents with the corresponding page number. However, the acknowledgement for thesis   and the abstract are usually not included in the table of contents. However, check with your institution as this could be dependent upon the formatting that you’re required to follow.

How can I make a table of contents in Microsoft Word?

On Microsoft Word, you will find the function to create a table of contents under the ‘references’ tab. Click on the tab and select ‘table of contents’. You can use one that has been designed by Microsoft Word, or you can create a custom one by yourself. Scroll down for a full tutorial on Microsoft Word and creating a table of contents.

Examples for Your Thesis

Below, you will find different examples for table of contents, including a

  • Single level table of contents example
  • Subdivided table of contents example
  • Multi-level table of contents example

We will also show you with an example how the table of contents for a bachelor’s thesis could look like, as well as for a master’s thesis.

Advice for creating a good table of contents: A good table of contents must be easy to read and formatted accurately, containing quick reference pages for all figures and illustrations. A table of contents example will help you structure your own thesis, but remember to make it relevant to your discipline. Table of contents example structures can be created for different disciplines, such as social sciences, humanities and engineering.

The type and length of a table of contents example will depend on the manuscript. Some thesis’ are short, containing just several chapters, whilst others (like a PhD thesis) are as lengthy as a book. This length will dictate the amount of detail that goes into forming a table of contents example page and the amount of “levels” (or subdivisions) in each chapter.

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Single Level Table of Contents Example

For shorter documents, a single level table of contents example can be used. This is a short and succinct table of contents example which utilises only single-level entries on sections or chapters. Remember, you’ll need to include properly formatted dots to lead the reader’s eye to the page number on the far right. The following table of contents example explores this basic structure:

Table-of-Contents-Example-Single-level-1

Subdivided Table of Contents E xample

A subdivided table of contents example is required for more lengthy papers, offering a subdivision of chapters and sections within chapters. These are more detailed and are recommended for higher-level dissertations like masters or PhD thesis’ (as well as some more detailed bachelor’s dissertations).

When formating subdivided table of contents example, ensure that chapters are listed in bold font and that subsections are not. It’s common (though not necessary) to denote each subsection by a number (1.1, etc.). You’ll also want to indent the subsections so that they can be read easily. The following table of contents example explores this structure:

Table-of-Contents-Example-Subdivided-table

Multi-level Table of Contents E xample

Adding additional levels to your table of contents is known as a multi-level table of contents example. These would be numbered onwards at 1.1.1, etc. Be aware that although you want to guide your reader through your manuscript, you should only highlight important areas of your manuscript, like sections and sub-sections, rather than random areas or thoughts in your manuscript. Creating too many levels will make your table of contents unnecessarily busy and too complex.

Table-of-Contents-Example-multi-level

Academic Table of Contents

All of the above can be used as an academic table of contents example. Often, each separate heading in an academic work needs to be both numbered and labelled in accordance with your preferred reference style (consult your department). The following table of contents example sections will illustrate a table of contents example for a bachelor thesis and a table of contents example for a master thesis.

Table of Contents Example: Bachelor’s Thesis

A bachelor’s degree thesis has no set word or page limit nationwide and will depend entirely on your university or department’s guidelines. However, you can expect a thesis under 60 pages of length at between 10,000 – 15,000 words. As such, you won’t be expected to produce a long and detailed table of contents example with multiple levels and subsections. This is because your main body is more limited in terms of word count. At most, you may find yourself using a subdivided table of contents similar to the table of contents example above.

A bachelor’s thesis table of contents example may be structured like so:

Table-of-Contents-Example-Bachelor-Thesis-1

This table of contents example may change depending on your discipline and thesis structure, but note that a single-level structure will often suffice. Subdivided structures like the table of contents example listed earlier will only be necessary when writing several chapters, like in a Master’s thesis.

Master’s Thesis Examples

A master’s table of contents example is more complex than a bachelor’s thesis. This is because they average at about 80 pages with up to 40,000 words. Because this work is produced at a higher academic level, it normally includes a subdivision of chapters and subheadings, with a separate introduction and conclusion, as well as an abstract.

A table of contents example for a master’s thesis may then look something like this:

Table-of-Contents-Example-Master-Thesis

 Microsoft Word Tutorial

Creating a table of contents page with Microsoft Word is simple.

In a Nutshell

  • All theses are different. Various departments and disciplines follow different structures and rules. The table of contents example pages here will help you in general to format your document, but remember to consult your university guidelines
  • Consistency and accuracy are the most important things to remember. You need the correct page number and the same layout for each chapter. It’s no good combining single-level table of contents with a multi-level table of contents
  • Simply put, bachelor’s thesis’ generally follow a single-level table of contents example unless otherwise specified
  • Postgraduate thesis’ like master and PhD-level work generally require a more detailed subdivision table of contents example. This is because they deal with both more complex arguments and more words
  • Remember to include all aspects of your thesis within the table of contents. Pre-thesis material needs to be listed in Roman numerals and you need to include all back-matter as well, such as References and Bibliography

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Table of Contents for Thesis Proposal

The table of contents for thesis proposal on the page that is dedicated to the chapters and their respective page numbers. The headings and subheadings are also mentioned on the page. The formatting for this page should be consistent and clear.

The table of contents is added after the introduction page and before the abstract. The table of contents should be of two pages, not more than that.

If you are planning on writing your thesis, do not skip this page and read further for the format and pattern of the table of contents.

In this post, you will learn:

What should you include in the table of contents?

Appendices and tables, the do’s and don’t’s, examples of the table of contents, a checklist for the table of contents.

Now that we have covered what the table of content is, you need to know what is included within the two pages of the list. If you feel like any portion of your dissertation is troubling you, you should get   dissertation writing help   by all means.

The table of content is an organized list that provides basic knowledge of what your thesis contains. The names of the chapters along with subheadings are added on the left side of the page. Whereas the number of the pages is written on the right side.

The table of contents is created for the sole purpose of locating a chapter and subheading by the reader. One should check with their universities and colleges if they have a specific format for the table of content.

Let us look into the general format of a table of content. The chapters (first level) and their second-level headings should be added to this. Remember, your motive behind creating this page is to make it easy for the reader to locate your chapters.

For example: Level one heading – Chapter 2. Literature Review Level two heading -2.1 Research Gap

The table of contents must include your appendices and table of figures. If you have more than three and four figures and tables, then they deserve their chapter. But if you dint get a lot of results from research, then those tables and figures can be shared in the list of contents.

Now the question arises, what does the appendices chapter include?

  • The original interviews, surveys, and questionnaires that were used to collect data for the research
  • Not more than two figures and tables should be added to the table of content.
  • If did not use a lot of abbreviations then you should share them in the table of content. But if you have tons of abbreviations and technical terms, then they should be listed in their chapters.

What are the Do’s and Don’t’s of the table of contents

The table of content may seem like a simple two-page table but in actuality can badly affect your thesis if not composed correctly. Due to this reason, one should be extra careful while numbering the pages and creating the different level headings.

Example of the table of contents

The page numbers assigned to the chapters in the table of contents should be the same as the number assigned at the beginning of each chapter. The example below demonstrates just that:

Checklist for the table of contents

To achieve perfection in the list of contents, you need a set of rules to follow. A starter’s checklist will guide you to do just that. Below is a checklist that will make sure your table of content is up to mark. And no matter what academic level of thesis you compose, this checklist can be used for all of them:

Collect the relevant information about the format according to your university and referencing style.

Start with the list of tables and bold the main chapters., all the titles of the chapter should be level one heading and the subheading should be level two., the numbers of the chapters and the page numbers given in the table should tally., all pages should be numbered after the chapters are written., final words:.

To create the table of contents for your thesis, use Microsoft word and customized it according to your thesis requirement. Apply the headings according to your style of preference. You can easily make the changes to the table itself at point of time with the help of the Microsoft Word table of contents.

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Education Under Graduate Graduate Masters PhD

  • K-State home
  • Graduate School
  • Faculty resources

April 02, 2024

Graduate school bulletin, table of contents.

Click on a category name to view that section or click on a headline to read the full announcement.

Articles of interest

  • It’s Time to Start Teaching Your Students How to Be a student

Faculty and Staff

Graduate school town hall session, spring strategic planning session to be held may 1, grad faculty memberships for fall 2024 semester, accelerated programs – use of the l-code, april slate showcase: the progress of the slate implementation.

  • Nine-month salary payment schedule change for 2024-2025 academic year
  • You're invited to th e Graduate Student and Faculty Recognition Celebration

Upcoming Events and Deadlines

Recruitment, upcoming webinars for students interested in pursuing graduate education, slate crm implementation for graduate school - update, graduate student success.

  • Master’s/Education Speci alist program of study update
  • Degree Analyst response times

Graduate Student Appreciation Month

Graduate students receive awards for outstanding research presentations at k-state grad forum.

  • Two graduate students recognized for their poster presentations at the Capitol Gradua te Research Summit (CGRS)

Opportunities for Graduate Students

K-state and the university press of kansas to host event on book publishing, opportunity for stem graduate students to teach in k-12 schools, funding and awards for graduate students, the advanced research projects agency – energy (arpa-e), it’s time to start teaching your students how to be a s tudent.

A recent article in Chronicles of Higher Education details the role o f a pro fessor in today’s college classrooms . The article details what behaviors and habits professors should introduce and reinforce to develop successful college students.

back to top

If you come across an article that would be of interest to other graduate programs, please send it to Michael Sellman , Graduate School communication specialist, at [email protected] , to have the article featured in a future Bulletin!

The Graduate School will be hosting a Town Hall session on April 10th from 3:00-4:30pm in Room 114, Leadership Studies Town Hall. In the “Building GS Strategic Leadership Role” Dean Petrescu will discuss the initiatives launched this academic year, the outcome of these initiatives and our plan for the next year. The event is for all graduate constituents. To accommodate schedules, we have set up a Zoom option. However, we encourage you to attend in person if possible.

Please RSVP your attendance. We look forward to seeing you all at the Town Hall!

The Graduate School will host the Spring Strategic Planning Session on May 1, 2024, from 11:00am – 2:00 p.m. in the Flint Hills Room of the Student Union. Please save the date on your calendars.

In this session, we will review, discuss and finalize the draft Graduate School Strategic Plan. This draft will be shared with the graduate constituents before the May session. The format will be similar to the session that was held in the Fall semester. Please visit the registration website to RSVP for the Planning Session.

G raduate faculty nomination materials should be submitted to [email protected] by April 10 if you intend to renew Associate memberships, nominate for regular membership, or request that non- grad faculty teach graduate courses for the Fall 2024 semester . The last opportunity for the Graduate Council to approve memberships before the summer hiatus is May 7. F ind nomination forms and guidelines on the Graduate School website . Please contact Timon Smock ( [email protected] ) at the Graduate School if you have questions regarding nominations .

The Registrar’s Office created a new code to track students enrolled in accelerated programs. Each participating graduate program has an associated L-code. For example, LMBA will be used for accelerated programs leading to the MBA regardless of the undergraduate program participating in the accelerated program (e.g., Chem/MBA and MNE/MBA will both have the LMBA code). When a student applies to and is accepted into an accelerated program, the L-code will be added to their record and appear as a non-degree seeking graduate program along with their undergrad degree code (e.g., BME). This addition allows the student to enroll in their 9-credits of overlapping coursework for graduate credit by using their L-code.

Students admitted to an accelerated program before the L-code was available require special handling. The Graduate School is creating a process in which Fall 2023 admits will be assigned the correct L-code thus designating them as an accelerated student. Students admitted before Fall 2023 may be treated the same way, but their treatment will depend on the term in which they were admitted and the procedures and policies at that time. Two FAQ pages are also available to answer common questions about accelerated programs. Any additional questions can be addressed to Dr. Michael Young, [email protected] .

The April Slate Showcase will be held April 22 from 2:30 to 3:30 pm via Zoom . This session will cover the progress of Slate implementation as the new application and CRM for the graduate school.

As the contract with implementation partner, Carnegie, comes to a close, this showcase will detail the progress that has been made on the application, CRM, and the recruitment process for the graduate school.

Please RSVP for this session by April 18 th at 5 pm.

Nine-month Graduate Assistantships salary payment schedule change for the 2024-2025 academic year

The nine-month salary payment schedule for the 2024/2025 academic year will be delayed until August 18. A memo was sent earlier this month to all units from HR and Provost office.

The nine-month contracts begin with the pay period that coincides with the first paycheck issued in September. In 2024, the contracts will begin August 18 and will move forward 20 pay periods until they end on May 24, 2025 .

In addition, there will be seven pay periods during the summer. Please refer to the University Handbook available on the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President website for more information.

You a re invited to the Graduate Student and Faculty Recognition Celebration

All K-State graduate students and graduate faculty are invited to the Graduate Student and Faculty Recognition Celebration, April 28, 5-7pm, College of Business Atrium . Sponsored by President Linton’s Office in partnership with the GSC and the Graduate School, we’ll celebrate the academic year and recognize graduate student achievements. Heavy hors d'oeuvres and refreshments will be served. RSVP by April 18 .

The Graduate School is hosting webinars for students interested in pursuing graduate education, respectively graduate certificate, master's and doctoral. Students can attend one or all webinars. The Graduate School is also promoting the webinars to prospective students.

The following webinars will be held in US Central Standard Time.

Please visit the Graduate School Webinars and Fairs website for more information .

  • We are one month out from the completion of our implementation contract with Carnegie. We will continue to work with them on the KSIS integration but the contract for building the application and workflow will be completed.
  • We gathered feedback on the application view from the implementation team, Faculty Task Force, and Graduate School for review and are implementing the approved updates.
  • We are updating forms for Slate including Pre-Review by the Graduate School, Faculty Feedback to the GPD, GPD Recommendation, Graduate School Review, and Assistantship/Scholarship Award.
  • We are finalizing the processing and immigration workflow based on feedback.
  • We worked with Carnegie to develop a new review process that can handle simultaneous form submissions for both faculty feedback and recommendation. Previously we had to break that into multiple bins, and we were able to reduce that to one.
  • The Graduate School has been updating the decision letters and is making updates based on feedback.
  • Carnegie has been helping us to build a standard GPA calculator for the last 60 hours .

The current timeline is as follows:

  • Phase 1- Completed by November 6, 2023
  • Building Records, Forms, Events, and Communications
  • Phase 2- Completed by January 22, 2024
  • The Application form developed
  • Phase 3- Complete by April 15th
  • Workflows designed
  • Final Implementation goal: April 29th
  • Historical Data Migration into Slate by May 31st

Master’s/Education Specialist program of study update

The master’s/education specialist program of study has an update . The prior program of study option for non-thesis/non-report option listed as “a ll cour sework . ” This option has been updated to “coursework . ” The reason for the update: to make the more clearer to students and faculty.

Degree Anal yst response times

For those who have tried to contact degree analysts, and are still waiting for a response, please be aware that the degree analysts are slow to respond to emails, calls, etc. Please be patient as they work through a large number of approval s to schedule final examination forms . Please be assured that they will reply as soon as they can .

This April, the Graduate School is celebrating the accomplishments and contributions of graduate students. The first week of April is nationally recognized as Graduate Student Appreciation Week. This is an opportunity to show appreciation to graduate students for their hard work and dedication to research, scholarly and creative work, teaching, leadership and service. A schedule of events celebrating and recognizing graduate students can be found on the Graduate School website .

Ten graduate students were presented with awards for outstanding presentations of their research and scholarly work to the K-State community and the public during the annual K-State Graduate Research, Arts and Discovery (K-GRAD) forum held March 20 and 21 in the K-State Student Union.

The following students were selected as award recipients of the 2024 K-State GRAD Forum:

Poster presentations:

  • Sabreena Ayoub Parray , master’s student in agronomy, “ Pre-breeding evaluation of Pearl millet germplasms for drought tolerance in diverse environments. ” Parray’s faculty mentors are Ramasamy Perumal, professor of agronomy, and P.V. Vara, university distinguished professor of agronomy.
  • Nirajan Piya, master’s student in biological and agricultural engineering, “ System development for application and testing of spray-on biodegradable mulch. ” Piya’s faculty mentor is Ajay Sharda, associate professor of biological and agricultural engineering.
  • Pedro Henrique Goncalves Pereira de Souza, master’s student in grain science, “E xploring the impact of xylanase sources and dosage on rheological properties of flour and baked product quality. ” De Souza’s faculty mentor is Elisa Karkle , assistant professor of grain science and industry.
  • Adi Siegmann, master’s student of human development and family science, specializing in couple and family therapy, “ Relational factors associated with the likelihood of male therapy attendance. ” Siegmann’s faculty mentor is Chelsea Spencer, research assistant professor of applied human sciences.
  • Brian Wolfe, master’s student in veterinary biomedical science, “ Biological sex differences in disease severity, lethal doses, and antibody responses after infection with h1n1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses in a mouse model. ” Wolfe’s academic faculty mentor is Santosh Dhakal, assistant professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology.

Oral Presentations:

  • Tucker Graff, doctoral student in grain science, “Effect of grain source on extruded feed characteristics and growth performance of rainbow trout.” Graff’s faculty mentor is Sajid Alavi, professor of grain science industry.
  • Nicole Kucherov, doctoral student in entomology, “ What's bugging you, from a landscape point of view. ” Kucherov’s faculty mentor is Tania Kim, assistant professor of entomology.
  • Roselle Barretto, doctoral student in biological and agricultural engineering, “ Bind and Grind: hemp protein takes on adhesive challenges. ” Barretto’s faculty mentor is Donghai Wang, professor of biological and agricultural engineering.
  • KaCee James, doctoral student in curriculum and instruction, “ A twenty-year comparison of traditionally and alternatively licensed school-based agricultural education teacher retention in Kansas. ” James’s faculty mentor is Gaea Hock, assistant professor of communications and agricultural education.

Two graduate students recognized for their poster presentations at the Capitol Graduate Research Summit (CGRS)

Ramona Weber, doctoral student in health and human sciences specializing in kinesiology and Jaymi Peterson, doctoral student in food, nutrition, dietetics and health, wer e recognized for their outstanding research poster presentations at the annual Capitol Graduate Research Summit , or CGRS, held at the State Capitol in Topeka on March 21.

Both Peterson and Weber received $500 scholarships from the Graduate School for their presentations.

Please read the CGRS press release for more information about their presentations and this year’s summit.

K-State and the University Press of Kansas will be hosting an informative event focused on finding publishers, revising dissertations and an authors’ roundtable.

The following events will be April 11 in the Hemisphere Room in Hale Library (HL581):

  • 1:00 – 2:00pm: University Press of Kansas Editor in Chief Joyce Harrison will discuss how to find the right publisher for your book project, and how to revise your dissertation for publication.
  • 4:00 – 5:00 pm: The Author Roundtable will include Jess Falcone, Michael Haddock, Michael Krysko, and Colby Moorberg. They will discuss how to navigate the publication process.
  • 5:00 pm: Michael Haddock will host a book launch social hour for his book, “Wildflowers and Grasses of Kansas: A Field Guide, Revised and Expanded Edition.

Registration is required for the event. Please email [email protected] for more information, or visit the University of Kansas Press website .

The Graduate School is partnering with the Kansas Department of Education to offer an opportunity for science, technology, engineering, math, finance, and accounting (STEM) graduate students who are interested in teaching STEM courses in K-12 schools.

All STEM graduate students, both domestic and international, are eligible to participate. Students are not required to have a teaching license at this point in time. The Department of Education will work with the Graduate School to address the licensing requirement through one of their licensing programs.

The following informative webinars will be hosted by Shane Carter, Director of Teacher Licensure, Kansas Department of Education:

  • April 10, 4:30 – 5:30pm, Zoom - please register by April 9
  • April 15, 1:00 – 2:00pm, Zoom - please register by April 14

While both webinars will cover the same information, participants can register for both if they choose. Please visit the registration form website to register for each or both webinars. The registration form also gives you the opportunity to ask questions about this program. Your questions will help Mr. Carter prepare for the webinars.

The Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) is currently recruiting new Fellows ! The ARPA-E is an agency within the Department of Energy. Its purpose is to fund high-risk, high-impact energy technologies. The Fellowship is a prestigious, two-year, full-time, paid federal position in Washington D.C. that is responsible for identifying technological whitespaces and conducting independent research and analysis.

Creative early-career scientists and engineers are invited to apply for the ARPA-E Fellowship and help direct the future of American energy innovation.

Visit the ARPA-E website for more information, and to apply.

  • Updated: 4/2/24

Master's Thesis Defense in Plastics Engineering: Perin Jhaveri 4/10

04/03/2024 By Danielle Fretwell

The Francis College of Engineering, Department of Plastics Engineering, invites you to attend a Master's Thesis defense by Perin Jhaveri on: Development of durable antimicrobial fabrics through surface functionalization. Candidate Name: Perin Jhaveri Degree: Master’s Defense Date: Wednesday, April, 10, 2024 Time: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: ETIC 445 Committee:

  • Advisor: Ramaswamy Nagarajan, Distinguished University Professor, Plastics Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Jay Hoon Park, Assistant Professor, Plastics Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Ravi Mosurkal, Co-Director of HEROES, DRTI, DEVCOM - Soldier Center

Brief Abstract: This research seeks to create advanced fabrics with wash-durable antimicrobial characteristics through surface functionalization. To achieve this a new method has been developed to first enhance the surface reactivity of fabrics of interest namely cotton and Nyco (Nylon 66−Cotton 50−50 wt% blend), rendering them responsive to subsequent covalent functionalization. Covalent functionalization of antimicrobial agents on the surface of the fabrics was demonstrated. A treatment process for the application of silanes was developed using two commercially available silane coupling agents. A systematic design of experiments was executed to optimize the reaction parameters. Furthermore, the simultaneous application of various silane coupling agents on fabrics to amplify their surface reactivity and enable the creation of textiles with multifunctional properties was investigated. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is utilized as an effective, cost-efficient, and safe antimicrobial agent. PHMB was covalently attached onto the surface of cotton and Nyco fabrics. Reaction parameters such as curing temperature and time, silane concentration, and PHMB concentration were optimized to maximize the weight gain and antimicrobial efficacy. The surface of the modified fabrics was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance mode (FTIR-ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and elemental analysis. Their tensile strength, tear resistance, and air permeability were evaluated according to their respective ASTM standards. The effectiveness of the antimicrobial treatment was tested before and after laundering. This study paves the way for innovative textile applications for the defense industry, healthcare, and beyond.

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table of contents of a master thesis

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Yokohama Map

table of contents of a master thesis

Fumi Sugi is an ally that you can meet and establish a bond with in Rise of the Ronin. The younger sister of Master Shoin and wife to Genzui , Fumi has a sharp intuition and is eager to help the anti-shogunate faction.

How to Recruit Fumi

Fumi-Bond.jpg

You'll automatically run into Fumi during the main story. Once you reach the Main Ronin Mission, Those Who Know Shoin , you'll be asked to assist Fumi in finding Shinsaku Takasugi in the Chinatown district of Yokohama.

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Fumi Sugi Bond Established

Fumi sugi stats and information.

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Up next: princess atsuko, top guide sections.

  • Walkthrough
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  • Collectibles
  • Tips and Tricks

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table of contents of a master thesis

Mind Your Manners

Imagining Masters Champions Dinner table etiquette

/content/dam/images/golfdigest/fullset/2023/1/GD0324_LOOP (1).jpg

Illustration by Michael Byers

Dinner table etiquette can be a fraught topic even on a normal night, but it takes on added importance the Tuesday before the Masters. That's when past green jacket winners gather to break bread, putting aside old rivalries and new grudges to celebrate the year's reigning champion . Everyone is surely on their best behavior but if a player does forget to mind their manners, allow us to remind them of the rules ... Don’t Discuss PGA Tour-PIF politics at the table.

Do Tell jokes into only the good ears of the Honorary Starters.

Don’t G et caught with a non-conforming butter knife.

Do Remove your Rangegoats hat in the dining room.

Don’t Anchor your salad fork.

Do Chew with your mouth closed even while Tiger recounts his 16th-hole chip-in.

RELATED: Our Mount Rushmore of Masters Champions Dinner menus may ruffle a few feathers

Don’t Dredge up four-decades-old cheating allegations.

Do Fold your napkin into an azalea when you head to the lavatory.

Don’t Sneak in your own Waffle House.

Do Remember the dress code: Jackets required.

Don’t Practice aimpoint with your peas.

Do Let the guy who just got a $300-million payday pick up the check.

RELATED: 60-year-old golf fan proudly shows off long-awaited first Masters tickets to mailman

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IMAGES

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  2. Appendix Master’s thesis, Stine Hesstvedt Contents

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  3. 20 Table of Contents Templates and Examples ᐅ TemplateLab

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  4. Table of Contents for Dissertation/ Research Paper & Example

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  5. Table Of Contents Master Thesis Example

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  6. Example for Table of Contents

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VIDEO

  1. What Is a master's Thesis (5 Characteristics of an A Plus Thesis)

  2. How to insert automatic table of contents

  3. how to insert table of contents in your thesis documents|| MS word tutorial

  4. Table of Contents and Thesis Headings

  5. Introduction for writing a Thesis documents using LaTeX *Full Tutorial*

  6. Thesis Table Format

COMMENTS

  1. Dissertation Table of Contents in Word

    Right-click the style that says "Heading 1.". Select "Update Heading 1 to Match Selection.". Allocate the formatting for each heading throughout your document by highlighting the heading in question and clicking the style you wish to apply. Once that's all set, follow these steps: Add a title to your table of contents.

  2. Order and Components

    Information included in the table of contents must match the headings, major subheadings, and numbering used in the body of the thesis or dissertation. The Table of Contents page(s) must be numbered with consecutive lower case Roman numerals centered with a 1/2″ margin from the bottom edge. Lists of Tables, Figures, and Illustrations

  3. Table of Contents

    Here is an example of a Table of Contents page from the Template. Please note that your table of contents may be longer than one page. << Previous: Dedication Page

  4. Table of Contents

    Automatic generation of the table of contents has 2 advantages: You don't have to manually type the table of contents. Since the entries in the Table of Content must match exactly the headings, subheadings, and page numbers in the thesis, manually creating a table of contents can lead to unintended errors. You don't have to go back and edit the ...

  5. PDF APA Style Dissertation Guidelines: Formatting Your Dissertation

    Dissertation Content When the content of the dissertation starts, the page numbering should restart at page one using Arabic numbering (i.e., 1, 2, 3, etc.) and continue throughout the dissertation until the end. The Arabic page number should be aligned to the upper right margin of the page with a running head aligned to the upper left margin.

  6. Organizing and Formatting Your Thesis and Dissertation

    Choose one type style (font) and font size and use it throughout the text of your thesis. Examples: Times New Roman and Arial. Font sizes should be between 10 point and 12 point. Font color must be black. Hyperlinked text must be in blue. If you hyperlink more than one line of text, such as the entire table of contents, leave the text black.

  7. PDF How to Write a Master's Thesis

    At the beginning of the thesis there should be a table of contents with corresponding page numbers. The subdivision of sections should be in relation to the length of your thesis, i.e. two or three levels are usually enough. The headings of the sections and subsections are supposed to be meaningful and should represent the line of thinking of ...

  8. What should be included in a dissertation table of contents?

    In the table of contents, include all level 1 and 2 headings, appendices, and lists of tables and figures. ... It is more common for a thesis to be a graduation requirement from a Master's degree. Even if not mandatory, you may want to consider writing a thesis if you: ... Your list of tables and figures should go directly after your table of ...

  9. KU Thesis and Dissertation Formatting: Table of Contents

    Creating an Automated Table of Contents. Located in the Home tab, Word's Style Gallery makes it easy to set consistent, one-click formatting for headings throughout your document.It is these style settings that Word uses to create an automatic table of contents. Using an automatic table of contents will save you the huge headache of dealing with dot leaders, spacing, and having to completely ...

  10. Creating a Table of Contents in Word for a Thesis ...

    In this detailed video tutorial, we'll walk you through the process of creating a professional Table of Contents (TOC) for your thesis or dissertation using ...

  11. How to Create a Table of Contents for a Dissertation (APA)

    To do this, first go to the Home tab. This is where you will choose the styles for the table of contents. Step 2. The top-level headings will be your chapter titles, so on the right side of the tab, apply the Heading 1 style. Step 3. The second-level headings will be your subheadings, so apply the Heading 2 style.

  12. Table of Contents

    Sample table of contents. What to include the abstract the lay summary the preface the table of contents all other preliminary pages the main divisions and subdivisions of the thesis end notes the bibliography the appendices Tables, figures, illustrations and appendices must be listed by number and title, and must include a page number.

  13. How to Create the Best Table of Contents for a Dissertation

    Generating Dissertation Table of Contents. First, to generate the Table of Contents, start by entering a blank page after the pages you need the table of contents to follow. To do so, click on the bottom of the page you want before the Table of Contents. Open the 'Insert' tab and select 'Page Break'.

  14. Dissertation Table of Contents in Word

    In the 'References' section at the top, locate the Table of Contents group. Click the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon and select 'Custom Table of Contents'. Here, you can select which levels of headings you would like to include. You can also make manual adjustments to each level by clicking the Modify button.

  15. PDF GSAM Guidelines for the FORMAT OF A MASTER'S THESIS

    The Table of Contents z The Table of Contents is basically an outline of the thesis, indicating on what page each major section (or chapter) or sub-section begins. It should enable the reader to find the various chapters easily. z Tables of contents usually include the following: The label, Table of Contents, in bold type, at the top of the page

  16. Table of Contents

    In Research, A Table of Contents (TOC) is a structured list of the main sections or chapters of a research paper, Thesis and Dissertation. It provides readers with an overview of the organization and structure of the document, allowing them to quickly locate specific information and navigate through the document.

  17. PDF 6.1.6. and 7.1.6. Sample Table of Contents (Master's Thesis)

    Sample Table of Contents (Master's Thesis) TABLE OF CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES iv LIST OF TABLES v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS vi ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS vii INTRODUCTION 1 CHAPTER 1: Gas and Particle Radiation 16 Objective of Present Study 30 CHAPTER 2: Literature Survey 41 Methods for Solving Radiative Transfer 59 ...

  18. Theses Structure

    Typical Structure of a Bachelor's or Master's Thesis Most thesis are structured as shown below. Each part may be split into several chapter. For example, the part introduction may have two separate chapters for a the general introduction to the topic and the research question. ... Following the table of contents, you also need to provide a list ...

  19. How to Create an APA Table of Contents

    Generating the table of contents. Now you can generate your table of contents. First write the title "Contents" (in the style of a level 1 heading). Then place your cursor two lines below this and go to the References tab. Click on Table of Contents and select Custom Table of Contents…. In the popup window, select how many levels of ...

  20. Table of Contents for Dissertation/ Research Paper & Example

    Open Home tab and choose the style for your table of contents (ToC next). Apply heading 1 to your chapters, heading 2 to the subheading, and if needed heading 3 to the level 3 heading. Next, you are going to create a research paper or PhD dissertation table of contents. Open References and choose ToC.

  21. Example for Table of Contents

    A master's table of contents example is more complex than a bachelor's thesis. This is because they average at about 80 pages with up to 40,000 words. Because this work is produced at a higher academic level, it normally includes a subdivision of chapters and subheadings, with a separate introduction and conclusion, as well as an abstract.

  22. Table of Contents for Thesis Proposal

    The table of content is an organized list that provides basic knowledge of what your thesis contains. The names of the chapters along with subheadings are added on the left side of the page. Whereas the number of the pages is written on the right side. The table of contents is created for the sole purpose of locating a chapter and subheading by ...

  23. April 02, 2024

    Master's/Education Specialist program of study update. The master's/education specialist program of study has an update. The prior program of study option for non-thesis/non-report option listed as "a ll cour sework. " This option has been updated to "coursework. " The reason for the update: to make the more clearer to students and ...

  24. Master's Thesis Defense in Mechanical Engineering: Joshua Landis 4/10

    The Francis College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, invites you to attend a Master's Thesis defense by Joshua Landis on: Measurement and mitigation of NOx emissions from the combustion of hydrogen and ammonia. Candidate Name: Joshua Landis. Degree: Master's. Defense Date: Wednesday, April 10 2024.

  25. M.S. Thesis Defense in Mathematics: Julia Koron 4/9

    The Kennedy College of Sciences, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, invites you to attend the Master's thesis defense by Julia Koron on "Linear Programming and Applications." Candidate Name: Julia Koron Degree: Master of Science in Mathematics Defense Date: Tuesday, April 9, 2024 Time: 11 a.m. to noon

  26. Master's Thesis Defense in Plastics Engineering: Perin Jhaveri 4/10

    The Francis College of Engineering, Department of Plastics Engineering, invites you to attend a Master's Thesis defense by Perin Jhaveri on: Development of durable antimicrobial fabrics through surface functionalization. Candidate Name: Perin Jhaveri Degree: Master's Defense Date: Wednesday, April, 10, 2024 Time: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

  27. Fumi Sugi

    Fumi Sugi. By Samuel Heaney , Brendan Graeber , Lauren Harper , +9 more. updated Apr 2, 2024. Fumi Sugi is an ally that you can meet and establish a bond with in Rise of the Ronin. The younger ...

  28. Imagining Masters Champions Dinner table etiquette

    April 03, 2024. Illustration by Michael Byers. Dinner table etiquette can be a fraught topic even on a normal night, but it takes on added importance the Tuesday before the Masters. That's when ...