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SAMPLE THESIS STATEMENTS

These sample thesis statements are provided as guides, not as required forms or prescriptions.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The thesis may focus on an analysis of one of the elements of fiction, drama, poetry or nonfiction as expressed in the work: character, plot, structure, idea, theme, symbol, style, imagery, tone, etc.

In “A Worn Path,” Eudora Welty creates a fictional character in Phoenix Jackson whose determination, faith, and cunning illustrate the indomitable human spirit.

Note that the work, author, and character to be analyzed are identified in this thesis statement. The thesis relies on a strong verb (creates). It also identifies the element of fiction that the writer will explore (character) and the characteristics the writer will analyze and discuss (determination, faith, cunning).

Further Examples:

The character of the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet serves as a foil to young Juliet, delights us with her warmth and earthy wit, and helps realize the tragic catastrophe.

The works of ecstatic love poets Rumi, Hafiz, and Kabir use symbols such as a lover’s longing and the Tavern of Ruin to illustrate the human soul’s desire to connect with God.

The thesis may focus on illustrating how a work reflects the particular genre’s forms, the characteristics of a philosophy of literature, or the ideas of a particular school of thought.

“The Third and Final Continent” exhibits characteristics recurrent in writings by immigrants: tradition, adaptation, and identity.

Note how the thesis statement classifies the form of the work (writings by immigrants) and identifies the characteristics of that form of writing (tradition, adaptation, and identity) that the essay will discuss.

Further examples:

Samuel Beckett’s Endgame reflects characteristics of Theatre of the Absurd in its minimalist stage setting, its seemingly meaningless dialogue, and its apocalyptic or nihilist vision.

A close look at many details in “The Story of an Hour” reveals how language, institutions, and expected demeanor suppress the natural desires and aspirations of women.

The thesis may draw parallels between some element in the work and real-life situations or subject matter: historical events, the author’s life, medical diagnoses, etc.

In Willa Cather’s short story, “Paul’s Case,” Paul exhibits suicidal behavior that a caring adult might have recognized and remedied had that adult had the scientific knowledge we have today.

This thesis suggests that the essay will identify characteristics of suicide that Paul exhibits in the story. The writer will have to research medical and psychology texts to determine the typical characteristics of suicidal behavior and to illustrate how Paul’s behavior mirrors those characteristics.

Through the experience of one man, the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, accurately depicts the historical record of slave life in its descriptions of the often brutal and quixotic relationship between master and slave and of the fragmentation of slave families.

In “I Stand Here Ironing,” one can draw parallels between the narrator’s situation and the author’s life experiences as a mother, writer, and feminist.

SAMPLE PATTERNS FOR THESES ON LITERARY WORKS

1. In (title of work), (author) (illustrates, shows) (aspect) (adjective). 

Example: In “Barn Burning,” William Faulkner shows the characters Sardie and Abner Snopes struggling for their identity.

2. In (title of work), (author) uses (one aspect) to (define, strengthen, illustrate) the (element of work).

Example: In “Youth,” Joseph Conrad uses foreshadowing to strengthen the plot.

3. In (title of work), (author) uses (an important part of work) as a unifying device for (one element), (another element), and (another element). The number of elements can vary from one to four.

Example: In “Youth,” Joseph Conrad uses the sea as a unifying device for setting, structure and theme.

4. (Author) develops the character of (character’s name) in (literary work) through what he/she does, what he/she says, what other people say to or about him/her.

Example: Langston Hughes develops the character of Semple in “Ways and Means”…

5. In (title of work), (author) uses (literary device) to (accomplish, develop, illustrate, strengthen) (element of work).

Example: In “The Masque of the Red Death,” Poe uses the symbolism of the stranger, the clock, and the seventh room to develop the theme of death.

6. (Author) (shows, develops, illustrates) the theme of __________ in the (play, poem, story).

Example: Flannery O’Connor illustrates the theme of the effect of the selfishness of the grandmother upon the family in “A Good Man is Hard to Find.”

7. (Author) develops his character(s) in (title of work) through his/her use of language.

Example: John Updike develops his characters in “A & P” through his use of figurative language.

Perimeter College, Georgia State University,  http://depts.gpc.edu/~gpcltc/handouts/communications/literarythesis.pdf

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  • When & How to Write a Thesis

I. What is a Thesis?

The thesis (pronounced thee -seez), also known as a thesis statement, is the sentence that introduces the main argument or point of view of a composition (formal essay, nonfiction piece, or narrative). It is the main claim that the author is making about that topic and serves to summarize and introduce that writing that will be discussed throughout the entire piece. For this reason, the thesis is typically found within the first introduction paragraph.

II. Examples of Theses

Here are a few examples of theses which may be found in the introductions of a variety of essays :

In “The Mending Wall,” Robert Frost uses imagery, metaphor, and dialogue to argue against the use of fences between neighbors.

In this example, the thesis introduces the main subject (Frost’s poem “The Mending Wall”), aspects of the subject which will be examined (imagery, metaphor, and dialogue) and the writer’s argument (fences should not be used).

While Facebook connects some, overall, the social networking site is negative in that it isolates users, causes jealousy, and becomes an addiction.

This thesis introduces an argumentative essay which argues against the use of Facebook due to three of its negative effects.

During the college application process, I discovered my willingness to work hard to achieve my dreams and just what those dreams were.

In this more personal example, the thesis statement introduces a narrative essay which will focus on personal development in realizing one’s goals and how to achieve them.

III. The Importance of Using a Thesis

Theses are absolutely necessary components in essays because they introduce what an essay will be about. Without a thesis, the essay lacks clear organization and direction. Theses allow writers to organize their ideas by clearly stating them, and they allow readers to be aware from the beginning of a composition’s subject, argument, and course. Thesis statements must precisely express an argument within the introductory paragraph of the piece in order to guide the reader from the very beginning.

IV. Examples of Theses in Literature

For examples of theses in literature, consider these thesis statements from essays about topics in literature:

In William Shakespeare’s “ Sonnet 46,” both physicality and emotion together form powerful romantic love.

This thesis statement clearly states the work and its author as well as the main argument: physicality and emotion create romantic love.

In The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne symbolically shows Hester Prynne’s developing identity through the use of the letter A: she moves from adulteress to able community member to angel.

In this example, the work and author are introduced as well as the main argument and supporting points: Prynne’s identity is shown through the letter A in three ways: adulteress, able community member, and angel.

John Keats’ poem “To Autumn” utilizes rhythm, rhyme, and imagery to examine autumn’s simultaneous birth and decay.

This thesis statement introduces the poem and its author along with an argument about the nature of autumn. This argument will be supported by an examination of rhythm, rhyme, and imagery.

V. Examples of Theses in Pop Culture

Sometimes, pop culture attempts to make arguments similar to those of research papers and essays. Here are a few examples of theses in pop culture:

FOOD INC TEASER TRAILER - &quot;More than a terrific movie -- it&#039;s an important movie.&quot; - Ent Weekly

America’s food industry is making a killing and it’s making us sick, but you have the power to turn the tables.

The documentary Food Inc. examines this thesis with evidence throughout the film including video evidence, interviews with experts, and scientific research.

Blackfish Official Trailer #1 (2013) - Documentary Movie HD

Orca whales should not be kept in captivity, as it is psychologically traumatizing and has caused them to kill their own trainers.

Blackfish uses footage, interviews, and history to argue for the thesis that orca whales should not be held in captivity.

VI. Related Terms

Just as a thesis is introduced in the beginning of a composition, the hypothesis is considered a starting point as well. Whereas a thesis introduces the main point of an essay, the hypothesis introduces a proposed explanation which is being investigated through scientific or mathematical research. Thesis statements present arguments based on evidence which is presented throughout the paper, whereas hypotheses are being tested by scientists and mathematicians who may disprove or prove them through experimentation. Here is an example of a hypothesis versus a thesis:

Hypothesis:

Students skip school more often as summer vacation approaches.

This hypothesis could be tested by examining attendance records and interviewing students. It may or may not be true.

Students skip school due to sickness, boredom with classes, and the urge to rebel.

This thesis presents an argument which will be examined and supported in the paper with detailed evidence and research.

Introduction

A paper’s introduction is its first paragraph which is used to introduce the paper’s main aim and points used to support that aim throughout the paper. The thesis statement is the most important part of the introduction which states all of this information in one concise statement. Typically, introduction paragraphs require a thesis statement which ties together the entire introduction and introduces the rest of the paper.

VII. Conclusion

Theses are necessary components of well-organized and convincing essays, nonfiction pieces, narratives , and documentaries. They allow writers to organize and support arguments to be developed throughout a composition, and they allow readers to understand from the beginning what the aim of the composition is.

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While Sandel argues that pursuing perfection through genetic engineering would decrease our sense of humility, he claims that the sense of solidarity we would lose is also important.

This thesis summarizes several points in Sandel’s argument, but it does not make a claim about how we should understand his argument. A reader who read Sandel’s argument would not also need to read an essay based on this descriptive thesis.  

Broad thesis (arguable, but difficult to support with evidence) 

Michael Sandel’s arguments about genetic engineering do not take into consideration all the relevant issues.

This is an arguable claim because it would be possible to argue against it by saying that Michael Sandel’s arguments do take all of the relevant issues into consideration. But the claim is too broad. Because the thesis does not specify which “issues” it is focused on—or why it matters if they are considered—readers won’t know what the rest of the essay will argue, and the writer won’t know what to focus on. If there is a particular issue that Sandel does not address, then a more specific version of the thesis would include that issue—hand an explanation of why it is important.  

Arguable thesis with analytical claim 

While Sandel argues persuasively that our instinct to “remake” (54) ourselves into something ever more perfect is a problem, his belief that we can always draw a line between what is medically necessary and what makes us simply “better than well” (51) is less convincing.

This is an arguable analytical claim. To argue for this claim, the essay writer will need to show how evidence from the article itself points to this interpretation. It’s also a reasonable scope for a thesis because it can be supported with evidence available in the text and is neither too broad nor too narrow.  

Arguable thesis with normative claim 

Given Sandel’s argument against genetic enhancement, we should not allow parents to decide on using Human Growth Hormone for their children.

This thesis tells us what we should do about a particular issue discussed in Sandel’s article, but it does not tell us how we should understand Sandel’s argument.  

Questions to ask about your thesis 

  • Is the thesis truly arguable? Does it speak to a genuine dilemma in the source, or would most readers automatically agree with it?  
  • Is the thesis too obvious? Again, would most or all readers agree with it without needing to see your argument?  
  • Is the thesis complex enough to require a whole essay's worth of argument?  
  • Is the thesis supportable with evidence from the text rather than with generalizations or outside research?  
  • Would anyone want to read a paper in which this thesis was developed? That is, can you explain what this paper is adding to our understanding of a problem, question, or topic?
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In Search of Middle Paths: Buddhism, Fiction, and the Secular in Twentieth-Century South Asia , Crystal Baines, English

Save Our Children: Discourses of Queer Futurity in the United States and South Africa, 1977-2010 , Jude Hayward-Jansen, English

Epistemologies of the Unknowable in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature , Maria Ishikawa, English

Revenge of the Nerds: Tech Masculinity and Digital Hegemony , Benjamin M. Latini, English

The Diasporic Mindset and Narrative Intersections of British Identity in Transnational Fiction , Joseph A. Mason, English

A 19TH CENTURY ETHNOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT UN/CAGED: NARRATIVES OF INFORMAL EMPIRE, AFROLATINIDAD, AND CONTEMPORARY ARTISTIC (RE)FRAMINGS , Celine G. Nader, English

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Writing the Aftermath: Uncanny Spaces of the Postcolonial , Sohini Banerjee, English

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LITERARY NEGATION AND MATERIALISM IN CHAUCER , Michelle Brooks, English

TRANSNATIONAL POLITICAL AND LITERARY ENCOUNTERS: THE IDEA OF AMERÍKA IN ICELANDIC FICTION, 1920–1990 , Jodie Childers, English

When Choices Aren't Choices: Academic Literacy Normativities in the Age of Neoliberalism , Robin K. Garabedian, English

Redefining Gender Violence: Radical Feminist Visions in Contemporary Ethnic American Women’s Fiction and Women of Color Activism 1990-2010 , Hazel Gedikli, English

Stories Women Carry: Labor and Reproductive Imaginaries of South Asia and the Caribbean , Subhalakshmi Gooptu, English

The Critical Workshop: Writing Revision and Critical Pedagogy in the Middle School Classroom , Andrea R. Griswold, English

Racial Poetics: Early Modern Race and the Form of Comedy , Yunah Kae, English

At the Limits of Empathy: Political Conflict and its Aftermath in Postcolonial Fiction , Saumya Lal, English

The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth- Century America , Leslie Leonard, English

No There There: New Jersey in Multiethnic Writing and Popular Culture Since 1990 , Shannon Mooney, English

Ownership and Writer Agency in Web 2.0 , Thomas Pickering, English

Combating Narratives: Soldiering in Twentieth-Century African American and Latinx Literature , Stacy Reardon, English

“IT DON’T ‘MEAN’ A THING”: TIME AND THE READER IN JAZZ FICTIONAL NARRATIVE , Damien C. Weaver, English

SATURNINE ECOLOGIES: ENVIRONMENTAL CATASTROPHE IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD, 1542-1688 , John Yargo, English

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Theater of Exchange: The Cosmopolitan Stage of Jacobean London , Liz Fox, English

“The Badge of All Our Tribe”: Contradictions of Jewish Representation on the English Renaissance Stage , Becky S. Friedman, English

On Being Dispersed: The Poetics of Dehiscence from "We the People" to Abolition , Sean A. Gordon, English

Echoing + Resistant Imagining: Filipino Student Writing Under American Colonial Rule , Florianne Jimenez, English

When Your Words Are Someone Else's Money: Rhetorical Circulation, Affect, and Late Capitalism , Kelin E. Loe, English

Indigenous Impositions in Contemporary Culture: Knotting Ontologies, Beading Aesthetics, and Braiding Temporalities , Darren Lone Fight, English

NEGRITUDE FEMINISMS: FRANCOPHONE BLACK WOMEN WRITERS AND ACTIVISTS IN FRANCE, MARTINIQUE, AND SENEGAL FROM THE 1920S TO THE 1980S , Korka Sall, English

Negotiating Space: Spatial Violation on the Early Modern Stage, 1587-1638 , Gregory W. Sargent, English

Stranger Compass of the Stage: Difference and Desire in Early Modern City Comedy , Catherine Tisdale, English

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AFFECTIVE HISTORIES OF SOUTHERN TRAUMA: SHAME, HEALING, AND VULNERABILITY IN US SOUTHERN WOMEN’S WRITING, 1975–2006 , Faune Albert, English

Materially Queer: Identity and Agency in Academic Writing , Joshua Barsczewski, English

ANGELS WHO STEPPED OUTSIDE THEIR HOUSES: “AMERICAN TRUE WOMANHOOD” AND NINETEENTH-CENTURY (TRANS)NATIONALISMS , Gayathri M. Hewagama, English

WRITING AGAINST HISTORY: FEMINIST BAROQUE NARRATIVES IN INTERWAR ATLANTIC MODERNISM , Annaliese Hoehling, English

Passing Literacies: Soviet Immigrant Elders and Intergenerational Language Practice , Jenny Krichevsky, English

Lisa Ben and Queer Rhetorical Reeducation in Post-war Los Angeles , Katelyn S. Litterer, English

Daring Depictions: An Analysis of Risks and Their Mediation in Representations of Black Suffering , Russell Nurick, English

From Page to Program: A Study of Stakeholders in Multimodal First-Year Composition Curriculum and Program Design , Rebecca Petitti, English

Forms of the Future: Indigeneity, Blackness, and the Visioning Work of Aesthetics in U.S. Poetry, 1822-1863 , Magdalena Zapędowska, English

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Black Men Who Betray Their Race: 20TH Century Literary Representations of the Black Male Race Traitor , Gregory Coleman, English

“The Worlding Game”: Queer Ecological Perspectives in Modern Fiction , Sarah D'Stair, English

Afrasian Imaginaries: Global Capitalism and Labor Migration in Indian Ocean Fictions, 1990 – 2015 , Neelofer Qadir, English

Divided Tongues: The Politics and Poetics of Food in Modern Anglophone Indian Fiction , Shakuntala Ray, English

Globalizing Nature on the Shakespearean Stage , William Steffen, English

Gilded Chains: Global Economies and Gendered Arts in US Fiction, 1865-1930 , Heather Wayne, English

“ÆTHELTHRYTH”: SHAPING A RELIGIOUS WOMAN IN TENTH-CENTURY WINCHESTER , Victoria Kent Worth, English

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Sex and Difference in the Jewish American Family: Incest Narratives in 1990s Literary and Pop Culture , Eli W. Bromberg, English

Rhetorical Investments: Writing, Technology, and the Emerging Logics of the Public Sphere , Dan Ehrenfeld, English

Kiskeyanas Valientes en Este Espacio: Dominican Women Writers and the Spaces of Contemporary American Literature , Isabel R. Espinal, English

“TO WEIGH THE WORLD ANEW”: POETICS, RHETORIC, AND SOCIAL STRUGGLE, FROM SIDNEY’S ARCADIA TO SHAKESPEARE’S THEATER , David Katz, English

CIVIC DOMESTICITY: RHETORIC, WOMEN, AND SPACE AT HULL HOUSE, 1889-1910 , Liane Malinowski, English

Charting the Terrain of Latina/o/x Theater in Chicago , Priscilla M. Page, English

The Politics of Feeling and the Work of Belonging in US Immigrant Fiction 1990 - 2015 , Lauren Silber, English

Turning Inside Out: Reading and Writing Godly Identity in Seventeenth-Century Narratives of Spiritual Experience , Meghan Conine Swavely, English

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Tragicomic Transpositions: The Influence of Spanish Prose Romance on the Development of Early Modern English Tragicomedy , Josefina Hardman, English

“The Blackness of Blackness”: Meta-Black Identity in 20th/21st Century African American Culture , Casey Hayman, English

Waiting for Now: Postcolonial Fiction and Colonial Time , Amanda Ruth Waugh Lagji, English

Latina Identities, Critical Literacies, and Academic Achievement in Community College , Morgan Lynn, English

Demanding Spaces: 1970s U.S. Women's Novels as Sites of Struggle , Kate Marantz, English

Novel Buildings: Architectural and Narrative Form in Victorian Fiction , Ashley R. Nadeau, English

CATCH FEELINGS: CLASS AFFECT AND PERFORMATIVITY IN TEACHING ASSOCIATES' NARRATIVES , Anna Rita Napoleone, English

Dialogue and "Dialect": Character Speech in American Fiction , Carly Overfelt, English

Materializing Transfer: Writing Dispositions in a Culture of Standardized Testing , Lisha Daniels Storey, English

Theatres of War: Performing Queer Nationalism in Modernist Narratives , Elise Swinford, English

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Multimodal Assessment in Action: What We Really Value in New Media Texts , Kathleen M. Baldwin, English

Addictive Reading: Nineteenth-Century Drug Literature's Possible Worlds , Adam Colman, English

"The Book Can't Teach You That": A Case Study of Place, Writing, and Tutors' Constructions of Writing Center Work , Christopher Joseph DiBiase, English

Protest Lyrics at Work: Labor Resistance Poetry of Depression-Era Autoworkers , Rebecca S. Griffin, English

From What Remains: The Politics of Aesthetic Mourning and the Poetics of Loss in Contemporary African American Culture , Kajsa K. Henry, English

Minor Subjects in America: Everyday Childhoods of the Long Nineteenth Century , Gina M. Ocasion, English

Enduring Affective Rhetorics: Transnational Feminist Action in Digital Spaces , Jessica Ouellette, English

The School Desk and the Writing Body , Marni M. Presnall, English

Sustainable Public Intellectualism: The Rhetorics of Student Scientist-Activists , Jesse Priest, English

Prosthetizing the Soul: Reading, Seeing, and Feeling in Seventeenth-Century Devotion , Katey E. Roden, English

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“As Child in Time”: Childhood, Temporality, and 19th Century U.S. Literary Imaginings of Democracy , Marissa Carrere, English

A National Style: A Critical Historiography of the Irish Short Story , Andrew Fox, English

Homosexuality is a Poem: How Gay Poets Remodeled the Lyric, Community and the Ideology of Sex to Theorize a Gay Poetic , Christopher M. Hennessy, English

Affecting Manhood: Masculinity, Effeminacy, and the Fop Figure in Early Modern English Drama , Jessica Landis, English

Who Do You Think You Are?: Recovering the Self in the Working Class Escape Narrative , Christine M. Maksimowicz, English

Metabolizing Capital: Writing, Information, and the Biophysical World , Christian J. Pulver, English

Audible Voice in Context , Airlie S. Rose, English

The Role of Online Reading and Writing in the Literacy Practices of First-Year Writing Students , Casey Burton Soto, English

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RESURRECTION: REPRESENTATIONS OF THE BLACK CHURCH IN CONTEMPORARY POPULAR CULTURE , Rachel J. Daniel, English

Seeing Blindness: The Visual and the Great War in Literary Modernism , Rachael Dworsky, English

HERE, THERE, AND IN BETWEEN: TRAVEL AS METAPHOR IN MIXED RACE NARRATIVES OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE , Colin Enriquez, English

Interactive Audience and the Internet , John R. Gallagher, English

Down from the Mountain and into the Mill: Literacy Sponsorship and Southern Appalachian Women in the New South , Emma M. Howes, English

Transnational Gestures: Rethinking Trauma in U.S. War Fiction , Ruth A.H. Lahti, English

"A More Natural Mother": Concepts of Maternity and Queenship in Early Modern England , Anne-Marie Kathleen Strohman, English

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Letters to a Dictionary: Competing Views of Language in the Reception of Webster's Third New International Dictionary , Anne Pence Bello, English

Staging the Depression: The Federal Theatre Project's Dramas of Poverty, 1935-1939 , Amy Brady, English

Our Story Has Not Been Told in any Moment: Radical Black Feminist Theatre From The Old Left to Black Power , Julie M Burrell, English

Writing for Social Action: Affect, Activism, and the Composition Classroom , Sarah Finn, English

Surviving Domestic Tensions: Existential Uncertainty in New World African Diasporic Women's Literature , Denia M Fraser, English

From Feathers to Fur: Theatrical Representations of Skin in the Medieval English Cycle Plays , Valerie Anne Gramling, English

The Reflexive Scaffold: Metatheatricality, Genre, and Cultural Performance in English Renaissance Drama , Nathaniel C. Leonard, English

The World Inscribed: Literary Form, Travel, and the Book in England, 1580-1660 , Philip S Palmer, English

Shakespearean Signifiers , Marie H Roche, English

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  • The portrayal of race and racism in the works of Toni Morrison.
  • The influence of African spirituality and religion in African American literature.
  • Exploring Afrofuturism through the works of Octavia Butler and N.K. Jemisin.
  • The representation of the family in African American literature post-1960s.
  • The use of southern settings in African American literature: A study of place and identity.
  • Intersectionality in the writings of Audre Lorde and Angela Davis.
  • The depiction of African American men in literature and media: Stereotypes vs. reality.
  • The impact of the Black Arts Movement on contemporary African American culture.
  • Literary responses to the Civil Rights Movement in African American literature.
  • The role of education in African American autobiographical writing.
  • The portrayal of historical trauma and memory in African American literature.
  • Analyzing black masculinity through the works of Richard Wright and James Baldwin.
  • The treatment of racial ambiguity and colorism in African American fiction.
  • The influence of hip-hop and rap on contemporary African American poetry.
  • The narrative strategies used in African American science fiction.
  • Postcolonial readings of African American literature: Transnational perspectives.
  • The evolution of black feminism reflected in literature.
  • The significance of folk motifs in the works of Zora Neale Hurston.
  • The impact of the Great Migration on literary depictions of African American life.
  • Urbanism and its influence on African American literary forms.
  • The legacy of Langston Hughes and his influence on modern African American poetry.
  • Comparing the racial politics in African American literature from the 20th to the 21st century.
  • The role of African American literature in shaping public opinion on social justice issues.
  • Mental health and trauma in African American literature.
  • The literary critique of the American Dream in African American literature.
  • Environmental racism and its representation in African American literature.
  • The adaptation of African American literary works into films and its cultural implications.
  • Analyzing class struggle through African American literary works.
  • The portrayal of African Americans in graphic novels and comics.
  • Exploring the African diaspora through literature: Connections and divergences.
  • The influence of Barack Obama’s presidency on African American literature.
  • Representation of African American LGBTQ+ voices in modern literature.
  • The use of speculative elements to explore social issues in African American literature.
  • The role of the church and religion in African American literary narratives.
  • Literary examinations of police brutality and racial profiling in African American communities.
  • The evolution of the American Dream in 20th-century American literature.
  • An analysis of naturalism and realism in the works of Mark Twain and Henry James.
  • The depiction of the frontier in American literature and its impact on national identity.
  • Exploring postmodern techniques in the novels of Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo.
  • The influence of immigration on American narrative forms and themes.
  • The role of the Beat Generation in shaping American counter-culture literature.
  • Feminist themes in the novels of Sylvia Plath and Toni Morrison.
  • Ecocriticism and the portrayal of nature in American literature from Thoreau to contemporary authors.
  • The depiction of war and its aftermath in American literature: From the Civil War to the Iraq War.
  • The treatment of race and ethnicity in the novels of John Steinbeck.
  • The role of technology and media in contemporary American fiction.
  • The impact of the Great Depression on American literary works.
  • An examination of gothic elements in early American literature.
  • The influence of transcendentalism in the works of Emerson and Whitman.
  • Modernist expressions in the poetry of Wallace Stevens and Ezra Pound.
  • The depiction of suburban life in mid-20th-century American literature.
  • The cultural significance of the Harlem Renaissance in the development of American literature.
  • Identity and self-exploration in the essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • Analyzing the concept of alienation in the works of Edward Albee and Arthur Miller.
  • The role of political activism in the plays of August Wilson.
  • The portrayal of children and adolescence in American literature.
  • The use of satire and humor in the novels of Kurt Vonnegut.
  • Exploring the American South through the literature of Flannery O’Connor and William Faulkner.
  • The representation of LGBTQ+ characters in American novels from the 1960s to present.
  • Consumer culture and its critique in American post-war fiction.
  • The legacy of slavery in American literature and its contemporary implications.
  • The motif of the journey in American literature as a metaphor for personal and collective discovery.
  • The role of the wilderness in shaping American environmental literature.
  • An analysis of dystopian themes in American science fiction from Philip K. Dick to Octavia Butler.
  • The representation of Native American culture and history in American literature.
  • The treatment of mental health in the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe.
  • American expatriate writers in Paris during the 1920s: Lost Generation narratives.
  • The influence of jazz music on the narrative structure of American literature.
  • The intersection of law and morality in the novels of Herman Melville.
  • Post-9/11 themes in contemporary American literature.
  • The evolution of feminist literature in America from the 19th century to modern times.
  • Examining consumerism and its discontents in the novels of Bret Easton Ellis.
  • The portrayal of American cities in 20th-century literature.
  • The impact of the civil rights movement on American literary production.
  • The use of magical realism in the works of contemporary American authors.
  • The role of fairy tales in the development of child psychology.
  • Representation of family structures in modern children’s literature.
  • Gender roles in classic vs. contemporary children’s books.
  • The evolution of the hero’s journey in children’s literature.
  • Moral lessons and their conveyance through children’s stories.
  • The impact of fantasy literature on children’s imaginative development.
  • Depictions of cultural diversity in children’s books.
  • The use of animals as characters and their symbolic meanings in children’s stories.
  • The portrayal of disability in children’s literature and its impact on inclusivity.
  • The influence of children’s literature on early reading skills.
  • Analysis of cross-generational appeal in children’s literature.
  • The role of illustrations in enhancing narrative in children’s books.
  • Censorship and controversial topics in children’s literature.
  • Adaptations of children’s literature into films and their impact on the stories’ reception.
  • The representation of historical events in children’s literature.
  • Exploring the educational value of non-fiction children’s books.
  • The treatment of death and loss in children’s literature.
  • The role of magic and the supernatural in shaping values through children’s books.
  • Psychological impacts of children’s horror literature.
  • The significance of award-winning children’s books in educational contexts.
  • The influence of digital media on children’s book publishing.
  • Parental figures in children’s literature: From authoritarian to nurturing roles.
  • Narrative strategies used in children’s literature to discuss social issues.
  • Environmental themes in children’s literature and their role in fostering eco-consciousness.
  • The adaptation of classic children’s literature in the modern era.
  • The portrayal of bullying in children’s books and its implications for social learning.
  • The use of humor in children’s literature and its effects on engagement and learning.
  • Comparative analysis of children’s book series and their educational impacts.
  • Development of identity and self-concept through children’s literature.
  • The effectiveness of bilingual children’s books in language teaching.
  • The role of rhyme and rhythm in early literacy development through children’s poetry.
  • Sociopolitical themes in children’s literature and their relevance to contemporary issues.
  • The portrayal of technology and its use in children’s science fiction.
  • The representation of religious themes in children’s books.
  • The impact of children’s literature on adult readership.
  • The influence of children’s literature on children’s attitudes towards animals and nature.
  • How children’s literature can be used to support emotional intelligence and resilience.
  • The evolution of adventure themes in children’s literature.
  • Gender representation in children’s graphic novels.
  • Analyzing the narrative structure of children’s picture books.
  • Cross-cultural influences in the modernist movements of Europe and Japan.
  • The depiction of the Other in Western and Eastern literature.
  • Comparative analysis of postcolonial narratives in African and South Asian literatures.
  • The concept of the tragic hero in Greek and Shakespearean drama.
  • The treatment of love and marriage in 19th-century French and Russian novels.
  • The portrayal of nature in American transcendentalism vs. British romanticism.
  • Influence of Persian poetry on 19th-century European poets.
  • Modern reinterpretations of classical myths in Latin American and Southern European literature.
  • The role of dystopian themes in Soviet vs. American cold war literature.
  • Magic realism in Latin American and Sub-Saharan African literature.
  • Comparative study of feminist waves in American and Middle Eastern literature.
  • The depiction of urban life in 20th-century Brazilian and Indian novels.
  • The theme of exile in Jewish literature and Palestinian narratives.
  • Comparative analysis of existential themes in French and Japanese literature.
  • Themes of isolation and alienation in Scandinavian and Canadian literature.
  • The influence of colonialism on narrative structures in Irish and Indian English literature.
  • Analysis of folk tales adaptation in German and Korean children’s literature.
  • The portrayal of historical trauma in Armenian and Jewish literature.
  • The use of allegory in Medieval European and Classical Arabic literature.
  • Representation of indigenous cultures in Australian and North American novels.
  • The role of censorship in Soviet literature compared to Francoist Spain.
  • Themes of redemption in African-American and South African literature.
  • Narrative techniques in stream of consciousness: Virginia Woolf and Clarice Lispector.
  • The intersection of poetry and politics in Latin American and Middle Eastern literature.
  • The evolution of the epistolary novel in 18th-century England and France.
  • Comparative study of the Beat Generation and the Angolan writers of the 1960s.
  • The depiction of spiritual journeys in Indian and Native American literatures.
  • Cross-cultural examinations of humor and satire in British and Russian literatures.
  • Comparative analysis of modern dystopias in American and Chinese literature.
  • The impact of globalization on contemporary European and Asian novelists.
  • Postmodern identity crisis in Japanese and Italian literature.
  • Comparative study of the concept of heroism in ancient Greek and Indian epics.
  • Ecocriticism in British and Brazilian literature.
  • The influence of the French Revolution on English and French literature.
  • Representation of mental illness in 20th-century American and Norwegian plays.
  • Themes of migration in the Caribbean and the Mediterranean literatures.
  • Gender and sexuality in contemporary African and Southeast Asian short stories.
  • The literary portrayal of technological advances in German and American literature.
  • Comparative study of children’s fantasy literature in the British and Egyptian traditions.
  • The role of the supernatural in Japanese and Celtic folklore narratives.
  • The impact of digital culture on narrative forms in contemporary literature.
  • Representation of the global financial crisis in 21st-century novels.
  • Analysis of identity and self in the age of social media as depicted in contemporary literature.
  • The role of dystopian themes in reflecting contemporary societal fears.
  • Post-9/11 political and cultural narratives in American literature.
  • The influence of migration on shaping multicultural identities in contemporary novels.
  • Gender fluidity and queer identities in contemporary literary works.
  • Environmental concerns and ecocriticism in 21st-century fiction.
  • The resurgence of the epistolary novel form in the digital age.
  • The depiction of mental health in contemporary young adult literature.
  • The role of indigenous voices in contemporary world literature.
  • Neo-colonialism and its representation in contemporary African literature.
  • The intersection of film and literature in contemporary storytelling.
  • Analysis of consumerism and its critique in modern literary works.
  • The rise of autobiographical novels in contemporary literature and their impact on narrative authenticity.
  • Technological dystopias and human identity in contemporary science fiction.
  • The representation of terrorism and its impacts in contemporary literature.
  • Examination of contemporary feminist literature and the evolution of feminist theory.
  • The literary treatment of historical memory and trauma in post-Soviet literature.
  • The changing face of heroism in 21st-century literature.
  • Contemporary plays addressing the challenges of modern relationships and family dynamics.
  • The use of supernatural elements in modern literary fiction.
  • The influence of Eastern philosophies on Western contemporary literature.
  • The portrayal of aging and death in contemporary novels.
  • The dynamics of power and corruption in new political thrillers.
  • The evolution of narrative voice and perspective in contemporary literature.
  • Representation of refugees and asylum seekers in modern fiction.
  • The impact of pandemics on literary themes and settings.
  • Postmodern approaches to myth and folklore in contemporary writing.
  • The critique of nationalism and patriotism in 21st-century literature.
  • The use of satire and irony to critique contemporary political climates.
  • Emerging forms of literature, such as interactive and visual novels, in the digital era.
  • The representation of class struggle in contemporary urban narratives.
  • Changes in the portrayal of romance and intimacy in new adult fiction.
  • The challenge of ethical dilemmas in contemporary medical dramas.
  • Examination of space and place in the new landscape of contemporary poetry.
  • Contemporary reimaginings of classical literature characters in modern settings.
  • The role of privacy, surveillance, and paranoia in contemporary narratives.
  • The blending of genres in contemporary literature: The rise of hybrid forms.
  • The portrayal of artificial intelligence and its implications for humanity in contemporary works.
  • The role of memory and nostalgia in the literature of the Jewish diaspora.
  • Narratives of displacement and identity in the African diaspora.
  • The portrayal of the Indian diaspora in contemporary literature.
  • Cross-cultural conflicts and identity negotiations in Korean diaspora literature.
  • The influence of colonial legacies on Caribbean diaspora writers.
  • The concept of “home” and “belonging” in Palestinian diaspora literature.
  • Exploring the Irish diaspora through literary expressions of exile and return.
  • The impact of migration on gender roles within Middle Eastern diaspora communities.
  • Representation of the Vietnamese diaspora in American literature.
  • Transnationalism and its effects on language and narrative in Chicano/Chicana literature.
  • Dual identities and the search for authenticity in Italian-American diaspora writing.
  • The evolution of cultural identity in second-generation diaspora authors.
  • Comparative analysis of diaspora literature from former Yugoslav countries.
  • The depiction of generational conflicts in Chinese-American diaspora literature.
  • The use of folklore and mythology in reconnecting with cultural roots in Filipino diaspora literature.
  • The representation of trauma and recovery in the literature of the Armenian diaspora.
  • Intersectionality and feminism in African diaspora literature.
  • The role of culinary culture in narratives of the Indian diaspora.
  • Identity politics and the struggle for cultural preservation in diaspora literature from Latin America.
  • The portrayal of exile and diaspora in modern Jewish Russian literature.
  • The impact of globalization on diaspora identities as reflected in literature.
  • Language hybridity and innovation in Anglophone Caribbean diaspora literature.
  • Literary portrayals of the challenges faced by refugees in European diaspora communities.
  • The influence of remittances and transnational ties on Filipino diaspora literature.
  • The use of magical realism to express diasporic experiences in Latin American literature.
  • The effects of assimilation and cultural retention in Greek diaspora literature.
  • The role of digital media in shaping the narratives of contemporary diasporas.
  • The depiction of the African American return diaspora in literature.
  • Challenges of integration and discrimination in Muslim diaspora literature in Western countries.
  • The portrayal of Soviet diaspora communities in post-Cold War literature.
  • The narratives of return and reintegration in post-colonial diaspora literatures.
  • The influence of historical events on the literature of the Korean War diaspora.
  • The role of diaspora literature in shaping national policies on immigration.
  • Identity crisis and cultural negotiation in French-Algerian diaspora literature.
  • The impact of diaspora on the evolution of national literatures.
  • Literary exploration of transracial adoption in American diaspora literature.
  • The exploration of queer identities in global diaspora communities.
  • The influence of the digital age on the literary expression of diaspora experiences.
  • Themes of loss and alienation in Canadian diaspora literature.
  • The role of literature in documenting the experiences of the Syrian diaspora.
  • The role of the supernatural in the works of Shakespeare.
  • The portrayal of women in Victorian novels.
  • The influence of the Romantic poets on modern environmental literature.
  • The depiction of poverty and social class in Charles Dickens’ novels.
  • The evolution of the narrative form in British novels from the 18th to the 20th century.
  • Themes of war and peace in post-World War II British poetry.
  • The impact of colonialism on British literature during the Empire.
  • The role of the Byronic hero in Lord Byron’s works and its influence on subsequent literature.
  • The critique of human rights in the plays of Harold Pinter.
  • The representation of race and ethnicity in post-colonial British literature.
  • The influence of Gothic elements in the novels of the Brontë sisters.
  • Modernism and its discontents in the works of Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot.
  • The treatment of love and marriage in Jane Austen’s novels.
  • The use of irony and satire in Jonathan Swift’s writings.
  • The evolution of the tragic hero from Shakespeare to modern plays.
  • Literary depictions of the British countryside in poetry and prose.
  • The rise of feminist literature in England from Mary Wollstonecraft to the present.
  • The portrayal of children and childhood in Lewis Carroll’s works.
  • Analyzing the quest motif in British Arthurian literature.
  • The influence of the Industrial Revolution on English literature.
  • Themes of alienation and isolation in the novels of D.H. Lawrence.
  • The representation of religious doubt and faith in the poetry of John Donne and George Herbert.
  • The role of espionage and national identity in British spy novels.
  • Literary responses to the Irish Troubles in 20th-century British literature.
  • The evolution of comic and satirical plays in British theatre from Ben Jonson to Tom Stoppard.
  • The treatment of death and mourning in the works of Emily Dickinson and Christina Rossetti.
  • Comparative study of myth and mythology in the works of William Blake and Ted Hughes.
  • The depiction of the British Empire and its legacies in contemporary British literature.
  • The role of landscape and environment in shaping the novels of Thomas Hardy.
  • The influence of music and poetry on the lyrical ballads of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
  • The impact of technology on society as depicted in the novels of Aldous Huxley.
  • The critique of societal norms and manners in Oscar Wilde’s plays.
  • Literary explorations of mental illness in the early 20th century.
  • The intersection of literature and science in the works of H.G. Wells.
  • The role of the sea in British literature: From Shakespeare’s tempests to Joseph Conrad’s voyages.
  • The impact of Brexit on contemporary British literature.
  • Themes of exile and displacement in the poetry of W.H. Auden.
  • The influence of American culture on post-war British literature.
  • The role of the detective novel in British literature, from Sherlock Holmes to contemporary works.
  • The portrayal of the “New Woman” in late 19th-century English literature.
  • The evolution of feminist thought in literature from the 19th century to the present.
  • Analysis of the portrayal of women in dystopian literature.
  • Intersectionality and its representation in contemporary feminist texts.
  • The role of women in shaping modernist literature.
  • Feminist critique of traditional gender roles in fairy tales and folklore.
  • The portrayal of female agency in graphic novels and comics.
  • The influence of second-wave feminism on literature of the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Postcolonial feminism in the works of authors from Africa and the Caribbean.
  • The depiction of motherhood in feminist literature across cultures.
  • The impact of feminist theory on the analysis of classical literature.
  • Ecofeminism: exploring the link between ecology and gender in literature.
  • Feminist perspectives on sexuality and desire in literature.
  • The intersection of feminism and disability in literary texts.
  • The role of the female gothic in understanding women’s oppression and empowerment.
  • Representation of transgender and non-binary characters in feminist literature.
  • Feminism and the critique of capitalism in literary works.
  • The representation of women in science fiction and fantasy genres.
  • Analysis of domesticity and the private sphere in 19th-century literature.
  • Feminist reinterpretations of mythological figures and stories.
  • The role of women in revolutionary narratives and political literature.
  • Feminist analysis of the body and corporeality in literature.
  • The portrayal of female friendships and solidarity in novels.
  • The influence of feminist literature on contemporary pop culture.
  • Gender and power dynamics in the works of Shakespeare from a feminist perspective.
  • The impact of digital media on feminist literary criticism.
  • Feminist literary responses to global crises and conflicts.
  • Queer feminism and literature: Exploring texts that intersect gender, sexuality, and feminist theory.
  • The portrayal of women in wartime literature from a feminist viewpoint.
  • Feminist poetry movements and their contribution to literary history.
  • The influence of feminist literary theory on teaching literature in academic settings.
  • Feminist analysis of women’s voices in oral narratives and storytelling traditions.
  • Representation of women in the detective and mystery genres.
  • The use of satire and humor in feminist literature to challenge societal norms.
  • Feminist perspectives on religious texts and their interpretations.
  • The critique of marriage and relationships in feminist novels.
  • Women’s narratives in the digital age: Blogs, social media, and literature.
  • Feminist literature as a tool for social change and activism.
  • The influence of feminist literature on legal and social policy reforms.
  • Gender roles in children’s literature: A feminist critique.
  • The role of feminist literature in redefining beauty standards and body image.
  • The evolution of the Gothic novel from the 18th century to contemporary Gothic fiction.
  • The representation of the sublime and the terrifying in Gothic literature.
  • The role of haunted landscapes in Gothic narratives.
  • Psychological horror vs. supernatural horror in Gothic literature.
  • The portrayal of madness in classic Gothic novels.
  • The influence of Gothic literature on modern horror films.
  • Themes of isolation and alienation in Gothic fiction.
  • The use of architecture as a symbol of psychological state in Gothic literature.
  • Gender roles and the portrayal of women in Victorian Gothic novels.
  • The revival of Gothic elements in 21st-century young adult literature.
  • The depiction of villains and anti-heroes in Gothic stories.
  • Comparative analysis of European and American Gothic literature.
  • The intersection of Gothic literature and romanticism.
  • The influence of religious symbolism and themes in Gothic narratives.
  • Gothic elements in the works of contemporary authors like Stephen King and Anne Rice.
  • The role of curses and prophecies in Gothic storytelling.
  • Gothic literature as social and cultural critique.
  • The representation of death and the afterlife in Gothic novels.
  • The use of dual personalities in Gothic literature.
  • The impact of Gothic literature on fashion and visual arts.
  • The role of secrecy and suspense in creating the Gothic atmosphere.
  • The depiction of the monstrous and the grotesque in Gothic texts.
  • Exploring the Gothic in graphic novels and comics.
  • The motif of the journey in Gothic literature.
  • The portrayal of science and experimentation in Gothic stories.
  • Gothic elements in children’s literature.
  • The role of nature and the natural world in Gothic narratives.
  • Themes of inheritance and the burden of the past in Gothic novels.
  • The influence of Gothic literature on the development of detective and mystery genres.
  • The portrayal of patriarchal society and its discontents in Gothic fiction.
  • The Gothic and its relation to postcolonial literature.
  • The use of folklore and myth in Gothic narratives.
  • The narrative structure and techniques in Gothic literature.
  • The role of the supernatural in defining the Gothic genre.
  • Gothic literature as a reflection of societal anxieties during different historical periods.
  • The motif of entrapment and escape in Gothic stories.
  • Comparative study of Gothic literature and dark romanticism.
  • The use of setting as a character in Gothic narratives.
  • The evolution of the ghost story within Gothic literature.
  • The function of mirrors and doubling in Gothic texts.
  • The portrayal of traditional spiritual beliefs in Indigenous literature.
  • The impact of colonization on Indigenous narratives and storytelling.
  • Analysis of language revitalization efforts through Indigenous literature.
  • Indigenous feminist perspectives in contemporary literature.
  • The role of land and environment in Indigenous storytelling.
  • Depictions of family and community in Indigenous novels.
  • The intersection of Indigenous literature and modernist themes.
  • The representation of cultural trauma and resilience in Indigenous poetry.
  • The use of oral traditions in modern Indigenous writing.
  • Indigenous perspectives on sovereignty and autonomy in literary texts.
  • The role of Indigenous literature in national reconciliation processes.
  • Contemporary Indigenous literature as a form of political activism.
  • The influence of Indigenous languages on narrative structure and poetics.
  • The depiction of urban Indigenous experiences in literature.
  • Analysis of Indigenous science fiction and speculative fiction.
  • The portrayal of intergenerational trauma and healing in Indigenous stories.
  • The role of mythology and folklore in contemporary Indigenous literature.
  • Indigenous authors and the global literary market.
  • The use of non-linear narratives in Indigenous storytelling.
  • Comparative study of Indigenous literatures from different continents.
  • The portrayal of Indigenous identities in children’s and young adult literature.
  • Representation of gender and sexuality in Indigenous literature.
  • The role of art and imagery in Indigenous narratives.
  • The influence of non-Indigenous readerships on the publication of Indigenous texts.
  • Environmental justice themes in Indigenous literature.
  • The depiction of historical events and their impacts in Indigenous novels.
  • Indigenous literature as a tool for education and cultural preservation.
  • The dynamics of translation in bringing Indigenous stories to a wider audience.
  • The treatment of non-human entities and their personification in Indigenous stories.
  • The influence of Indigenous storytelling techniques on contemporary cinema.
  • Indigenous authorship and intellectual property rights.
  • The impact of awards and recognitions on Indigenous literary careers.
  • Analysis of Indigenous autobiographies and memoirs.
  • The role of mentorship and community support in the development of Indigenous writers.
  • Comparative analysis of traditional and contemporary forms of Indigenous poetry.
  • The effect of digital media on the dissemination of Indigenous stories.
  • Indigenous resistance and survival narratives in the face of cultural assimilation.
  • The role of Indigenous literature in shaping cultural policies.
  • Exploring hybrid identities through Indigenous literature.
  • The representation of Indigenous spiritual practices in modern novels.
  • The application of deconstruction in contemporary literary analysis.
  • The impact of feminist theory on the interpretation of classic literature.
  • Marxism and its influence on the critique of 21st-century novels.
  • The role of psychoanalytic theory in understanding character motivations and narrative structures.
  • Postcolonial theory and its application to modern diaspora literature.
  • The relevance of structuralism in today’s literary studies.
  • The intersection of queer theory and literature.
  • The use of ecocriticism to interpret environmental themes in literature.
  • Reader-response theory and its implications for understanding audience engagement.
  • The influence of New Historicism on the interpretation of historical novels.
  • The application of critical race theory in analyzing literature by authors of color.
  • The role of biographical criticism in studying authorial intent.
  • The impact of digital humanities on literary studies.
  • The application of narrative theory in the study of non-linear storytelling.
  • The critique of capitalism using cultural materialism in contemporary literature.
  • The evolution of feminist literary criticism from the second wave to the present.
  • Hermeneutics and the philosophy of interpretation in literature.
  • The study of semiotics in graphic novels and visual literature.
  • The role of myth criticism in understanding modern reinterpretations of ancient stories.
  • Comparative literature and the challenges of cross-cultural interpretations.
  • The impact of globalization on postcolonial literary theories.
  • The application of disability studies in literary analysis.
  • Memory studies and its influence on the interpretation of narrative time.
  • The influence of phenomenology on character analysis in novels.
  • The role of orientalism in the depiction of the East in Western literature.
  • The relevance of Bakhtin’s theories on dialogism and the carnivalesque in contemporary media.
  • The implications of translation studies for interpreting multilingual texts.
  • The use of animal studies in literature to critique human-animal relationships.
  • The role of affect theory in understanding emotional responses to literature.
  • The critique of imperialism and nationalism in literature using postcolonial theories.
  • The implications of intersectionality in feminist literary criticism.
  • The application of Freudian concepts to the analysis of horror and Gothic literature.
  • The use of genre theory in classifying emerging forms of digital literature.
  • The critique of linguistic imperialism in postcolonial literature.
  • The use of performance theory in the study of drama and poetry readings.
  • The relevance of Antonio Gramsci’s theory of cultural hegemony in literary studies.
  • The examination of space and place in urban literature using spatial theory.
  • The impact of surveillance culture on contemporary narrative forms.
  • The application of chaos theory to the analysis of complex narrative structures.
  • The role of allegory in political and religious texts through historical and contemporary lenses.
  • Adaptation theory and the translation of literary narratives into film.
  • The role of the director as an interpreter of literary texts in cinema.
  • Comparative analysis of narrative techniques in novels and their film adaptations.
  • The impact of film adaptations on the reception of classic literature.
  • The portrayal of historical events in literature and film.
  • The influence of screenplay structure on literary narrative forms.
  • The representation of gender roles in book-to-film adaptations.
  • The intertextuality between film scripts and their source novels.
  • The use of visual symbolism in films adapted from literary works.
  • The portrayal of psychological depth in characters from literature to film.
  • The adaptation of non-fiction literature into documentary filmmaking.
  • The impact of the author’s biographical elements on film adaptations.
  • The role of music and sound in enhancing narrative elements from literature in films.
  • The evolution of the horror genre from literature to film.
  • The representation of science fiction themes in literature and their adaptation to cinema.
  • The influence of fan culture on the adaptation process.
  • The depiction of dystopian societies in books and their cinematic counterparts.
  • The challenges of translating poetry into visual narrative.
  • The portrayal of magical realism in literature and film.
  • The depiction of race and ethnicity in adaptations of multicultural literature.
  • The role of the viewer’s perspective in literature vs. film.
  • The effectiveness of dialogue adaptation from literary dialogues to film scripts.
  • The impact of setting and locale in film adaptations of regional literature.
  • The transformation of the mystery genre from page to screen.
  • The adaptation of children’s literature into family films.
  • The narrative construction of heroism in literary epics and their film adaptations.
  • The influence of graphic novels on visual storytelling in films.
  • The adaptation of classical mythology in modern cinema.
  • The ethics of adapting real-life events and biographies into film.
  • The role of cinematic techniques in depicting internal monologues from novels.
  • The comparison of thematic depth in short stories and their film adaptations.
  • The portrayal of alienation in modern literature and independent films.
  • The adaptation of stage plays into feature films.
  • The challenges of adapting experimental literature into conventional film formats.
  • The representation of time and memory in literature and film.
  • The adaptation of young adult novels into film franchises.
  • The role of directorial vision in reinterpreting a literary work for the screen.
  • The cultural impact of blockbuster adaptations of fantasy novels.
  • The influence of cinematic adaptations on contemporary novel writing.
  • The role of censorship in the adaptation of controversial literary works to film.
  • The portrayal of the American Revolution in contemporary historical novels.
  • The impact of the World Wars on European literary expression.
  • The depiction of the Victorian era in British novels.
  • Literary responses to the Great Depression in American literature.
  • The representation of the Russian Revolution in 20th-century literature.
  • The influence of the Harlem Renaissance on African American literature.
  • The role of literature in documenting the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.
  • The depiction of colonialism and its aftermath in African literature.
  • The influence of historical events on the development of national literatures.
  • The role of literary works in shaping public memory of historical tragedies.
  • The portrayal of the Holocaust in European and American literature.
  • The use of allegory to critique political regimes in 20th-century literature.
  • The depiction of indigenous histories and resistances in literature.
  • The representation of the French Revolution in romantic literature.
  • Literature as a tool for national identity construction in postcolonial states.
  • The portrayal of historical figures in biographical novels.
  • The influence of the Cold War on spy novels and political thrillers.
  • The impact of migration and diaspora on historical narratives in literature.
  • The role of the ancient world in shaping modern historical novels.
  • The depiction of the Industrial Revolution and its impacts in literature.
  • The role of women in historical novels from the feminist perspective.
  • The representation of religious conflicts and their historical impacts in literature.
  • The influence of myth and folklore on historical narrative constructions.
  • The depiction of the American West in literature and its historical inaccuracies.
  • The role of literature in the preservation of endangered languages and cultures.
  • The impact of digital archives on the study of literature and history.
  • The use of literature to explore counterfactual histories.
  • The portrayal of piracy and maritime history in adventure novels.
  • Literary depictions of the fall of empires and their historical contexts.
  • The impact of archaeological discoveries on historical fiction.
  • The influence of the Spanish Civil War on global literary movements.
  • The depiction of social upheavals and their impacts on literary production.
  • The role of literature in documenting the environmental history of regions.
  • The portrayal of non-Western historical narratives in global literature.
  • The impact of historical laws and policies on the lives of characters in novels.
  • The influence of public health crises and pandemics on literature.
  • The representation of trade routes and their historical significance in literature.
  • The depiction of revolutions and uprisings in Latin American literature.
  • The role of historical texts in the reimagining of genre literature.
  • The influence of postmodernism on the interpretation of historical narratives in literature.
  • The exploration of existential themes in modern literature.
  • The representation of Platonic ideals in Renaissance literature.
  • Nietzschean perspectives in the works of postmodern authors.
  • The influence of Stoicism on characters’ development in classical literature.
  • The portrayal of ethical dilemmas in war novels.
  • The philosophical underpinnings of utopian and dystopian literature.
  • The role of absurdism in the narratives of 20th-century plays.
  • The concept of ‘the Other’ in literature, from a phenomenological viewpoint.
  • The depiction of free will and determinism in science fiction.
  • The influence of feminist philosophy on contemporary literature.
  • The exploration of Socratic dialogue within literary texts.
  • The reflection of Cartesian dualism in Gothic novels.
  • Buddhist philosophy in the works of Eastern and Western authors.
  • The impact of existentialism on the characterization in novels by Camus and Sartre.
  • The use of allegory to explore philosophical concepts in medieval literature.
  • The portrayal of hedonism and asceticism in biographical fiction.
  • The exploration of phenomenology in autobiographical narratives.
  • Literary critiques of capitalism through Marxist philosophy.
  • The relationship between language and reality in post-structuralist texts.
  • The depiction of nihilism in Russian literature.
  • The intersection of Confucian philosophy and traditional Asian narratives.
  • The exploration of human nature in literature from a Hobbesian perspective.
  • The influence of pragmatism on American literary realism.
  • The portrayal of justice and injustice in novels centered on legal dilemmas.
  • The exploration of existential risk and future ethics in speculative fiction.
  • The philosophical examination of memory and identity in memoirs and autobiographies.
  • The role of ethics in the portrayal of artificial intelligence in literature.
  • The literary interpretation of Schopenhauer’s philosophy of pessimism.
  • The reflection of Epicurean philosophy in modern travel literature.
  • The influence of Kantian ethics on the narratives of moral conflict.
  • The representation of libertarian philosophies in dystopian literature.
  • The philosophical discourse on beauty and aesthetics in literature.
  • The exploration of virtue ethics through historical biographical novels.
  • The philosophical implications of transhumanism in cyberpunk literature.
  • The use of literature to explore the philosophical concept of the sublime.
  • The narrative structures of temporality and eternity in philosophical novels.
  • The impact of neo-Platonism on the symbolism in Renaissance poetry.
  • The portrayal of existential isolation in urban contemporary novels.
  • The reflection of utilitarianism in social and political novels.
  • The exploration of ethical ambiguity in spy and thriller genres.
  • The portrayal of psychological disorders in modernist literature.
  • Exploration of trauma and its narrative representation in post-war novels.
  • The use of stream of consciousness as a method to explore cognitive processes in literature.
  • The psychological impact of isolation in dystopian literature.
  • The depiction of childhood and development in coming-of-age novels.
  • Psychological manipulation in the narrative structure of mystery and thriller novels.
  • The role of psychological resilience in characters surviving extreme conditions.
  • The influence of Freudian theory on the interpretation of dreams in literature.
  • The use of psychological archetypes in the development of mythological storytelling.
  • The portrayal of psychological therapy and its impacts in contemporary fiction.
  • Analysis of cognitive dissonance through characters’ internal conflicts in novels.
  • The exploration of the Jungian shadow in villain characters.
  • Psychological profiling of protagonists in crime fiction.
  • The impact of societal expectations on mental health in historical novels.
  • The role of psychology in understanding unreliable narrators.
  • The depiction of addiction and recovery in autobiographical works.
  • The exploration of grief and mourning in poetry.
  • Psychological theories of love as depicted in romantic literature.
  • The narrative portrayal of dissociative identity disorder in literature.
  • The use of psychological suspense in Gothic literature.
  • The representation of anxiety and depression in young adult fiction.
  • Psychological effects of war on soldiers as depicted in military fiction.
  • The role of psychoanalysis in interpreting symbolic content in fairy tales.
  • The psychological impact of technological change as seen in science fiction.
  • The exploration of existential crises in philosophical novels.
  • The depiction of social psychology principles in literature about cults and mass movements.
  • Psychological aspects of racial and gender identity in contemporary literature.
  • The representation of the subconscious in surreal and absurd literature.
  • The application of psychological resilience theories in survival literature.
  • The portrayal of parental influence on child development in family sagas.
  • Psychological theories of aging as explored in literature about the elderly.
  • The depiction of sensory processing disorders in fictional characters.
  • Psychological effects of immigration and cultural assimilation in diaspora literature.
  • The role of narrative therapy in autobiographical writing and memoirs.
  • The portrayal of obsessive-compulsive disorder in narrative fiction.
  • Psychological implications of virtual realities in cyberpunk literature.
  • The representation of psychopathy in anti-hero characters.
  • The exploration of group dynamics and leadership in epic tales.
  • Psychological interpretations of magical realism as a reflection of cultural psyche.
  • The use of literature in the therapeutic practice and understanding of mental health issues.
  • The influence of Christian theology on medieval epic poems.
  • The role of allegory in interpreting medieval morality plays.
  • The depiction of chivalry and courtly love in Arthurian legends.
  • Comparative analysis of the heroic ideals in Beowulf and the Song of Roland.
  • The impact of the Black Death on the themes of medieval poetry and prose.
  • The portrayal of women in medieval romances.
  • The use of dreams as a narrative device in medieval literature.
  • The representation of the otherworldly and supernatural in medieval texts.
  • The function of medieval bestiaries in literature and their symbolic meanings.
  • The influence of the Crusades on medieval literature across Europe.
  • The evolution of the troubadour and trouvère traditions in medieval France.
  • The depiction of feudalism and social hierarchy in medieval narratives.
  • The role of satire and humor in the Canterbury Tales.
  • The impact of monastic life on medieval literary production.
  • The use of vernacular languages in medieval literature versus Latin texts.
  • The portrayal of sin and redemption in Dante’s Divine Comedy.
  • The literary responses to the Mongol invasions in medieval Eurasian literature.
  • The development of allegorical interpretation in medieval biblical exegesis.
  • The influence of Islamic culture on medieval European literature.
  • The representation of Jewish communities in medieval Christian literature.
  • The concept of kingship and rule in Anglo-Saxon literature.
  • The use of landscape and nature in medieval Celtic stories.
  • The role of pilgrimage in shaping medieval narrative structures.
  • The depiction of witchcraft and magic in medieval texts.
  • Gender roles and their subversion in Middle English literature.
  • The literary legacy of Charlemagne in medieval European epics.
  • The portrayal of disability and disease in medieval literature.
  • The use of relics and iconography in medieval religious writings.
  • The medieval origins of modern fantasy literature tropes.
  • The use of cryptography and secret messages in medieval romance literature.
  • The influence of medieval astronomy and cosmology on literary works.
  • The role of manuscript culture in preserving medieval literary texts.
  • The depiction of Vikings in medieval English and Scandinavian literature.
  • Medieval literary depictions of Byzantine and Ottoman interactions.
  • The representation of sermons and homilies in medieval literature.
  • The literary forms and functions of medieval liturgical drama.
  • The influence of classical antiquity on medieval literary forms.
  • The use of irony and parody in medieval fabliaux.
  • The role of the troubadour poetry in the development of lyrical music traditions.
  • The impact of medieval legal texts on contemporary narrative forms.
  • The influence of urbanization on narrative form in Modernist literature.
  • Stream of consciousness technique in the works of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce.
  • The role of symbolism and imagery in T.S. Eliot’s poetry.
  • The depiction of the World War I experience in Modernist novels.
  • The impact of Freudian psychology on Modernist character development.
  • The intersection of visual arts and narrative structure in Modernist poetry.
  • The critique of imperialism and colonialism in Modernist texts.
  • The representation of gender and sexuality in Modernist literature.
  • The influence of technology and industrialization on Modernist themes.
  • The use of fragmentation and non-linear narratives in Modernist fiction.
  • The evolution of the novel form in Modernist literature.
  • The role of existential philosophy in shaping Modernist themes.
  • The critique of traditional values and societal norms in Modernist works.
  • The portrayal of alienation and isolation in the Modernist era.
  • The impact of Jazz music on the rhythm and structure of Modernist poetry.
  • The role of expatriate writers in the development of Modernist literature.
  • The influence of Russian literature on Modernist authors.
  • The exploration of time and memory in Modernist narrative techniques.
  • The depiction of urban alienation and anonymity in Modernist literature.
  • The role of patronage and literary salons in the promotion of Modernist art.
  • The impact of cinema on Modernist narrative techniques.
  • The representation of religious doubt and spiritual crisis in Modernist texts.
  • The influence of Cubism on the form and structure of Modernist poetry.
  • The use of irony and satire in the critiques of Modernist society.
  • The interplay between Modernist literature and the emerging psychoanalytic discourse.
  • The depiction of the breakdown of language and communication in Modernist works.
  • The role of the anti-hero in Modernist novels.
  • The impact of existential despair on the themes of Modernist literature.
  • The representation of the New Woman in Modernist fiction.
  • The influence of Eastern philosophies on Modernist thought and writings.
  • The critique of materialism and consumer culture in Modernist literature.
  • The role of myth and narrative reconfiguration in Modernist poetry.
  • The depiction of war trauma and its aftermath in Modernist literature.
  • The representation of racial and ethnic identities in Modernist works.
  • The impact of avant-garde movements on Modernist literary forms.
  • The influence of European intellectual movements on American Modernist writers.
  • The role of the flâneur in Modernist literature and urban exploration.
  • The exploration of linguistic innovation in the works of Gertrude Stein.
  • The critique of historical progress in Modernist narratives.
  • The impact of existentialism on the depiction of the absurd in Modernist theatre.
  • The representation of colonial impact on identity in postcolonial narratives.
  • The role of language and power in postcolonial literature.
  • The portrayal of gender and resistance in postcolonial women’s writings.
  • The depiction of hybridity and cultural syncretism in postcolonial texts.
  • The influence of native folklore and mythology in postcolonial storytelling.
  • The critique of neocolonialism and globalization in contemporary postcolonial literature.
  • The exploration of diaspora and migration in postcolonial narratives.
  • The role of the subaltern voice in postcolonial literature.
  • The impact of postcolonial theory on Western literary criticism.
  • The representation of landscapes and spaces in postcolonial works.
  • The portrayal of historical trauma and memory in postcolonial fiction.
  • The exploration of identity and belonging in postcolonial children’s literature.
  • The use of magical realism as a political tool in postcolonial literature.
  • The depiction of urbanization and its effects in postcolonial cities.
  • The role of religion in shaping postcolonial identities.
  • The impact of apartheid and its aftermath in South African literature.
  • The representation of indigenous knowledge systems in postcolonial texts.
  • The critique of patriarchy in postcolonial narratives.
  • The exploration of linguistic decolonization in postcolonial writing.
  • The portrayal of conflict and reconciliation in postcolonial societies.
  • The depiction of postcolonial resistance strategies in literature.
  • The representation of climate change and environmental issues in postcolonial contexts.
  • The role of education in postcolonial literature.
  • The impact of tourism and exoticism on postcolonial identities.
  • The exploration of economic disparities in postcolonial narratives.
  • The representation of refugees and asylum seekers in postcolonial literature.
  • The portrayal of political corruption and governance in postcolonial works.
  • The depiction of cultural preservation and loss in postcolonial societies.
  • The role of oral traditions in contemporary postcolonial literature.
  • The portrayal of transnational identities in postcolonial fiction.
  • The exploration of gender fluidity and sexuality in postcolonial texts.
  • The depiction of labor migration and its effects in postcolonial literature.
  • The role of the media in shaping postcolonial discourses.
  • The impact of Western pop culture on postcolonial societies.
  • The portrayal of intergenerational conflict in postcolonial families.
  • The depiction of mental health issues in postcolonial contexts.
  • The exploration of postcolonial futurism in African speculative fiction.
  • The representation of native resistance against colonial forces in historical novels.
  • The critique of linguistic imperialism in postcolonial education.
  • The depiction of decolonization movements in postcolonial literature.
  • The use of metafiction and narrative self-awareness in postmodern literature.
  • The role of irony and playfulness in postmodern texts.
  • The exploration of fragmented identities in postmodern novels.
  • The deconstruction of traditional narrative structures in postmodern works.
  • The representation of hyperreality and the simulation of reality in postmodern fiction.
  • The critique of consumer culture and its influence on postmodern characters.
  • The exploration of historiographic metafiction and the reinterpretation of history.
  • The role of pastiche and intertextuality in postmodern literature.
  • The depiction of paranoia and conspiracy in postmodern narratives.
  • The portrayal of cultural relativism and the challenge to universal truths.
  • The use of multimedia and digital influences in postmodern writing.
  • The exploration of existential uncertainty in postmodern philosophy and literature.
  • The role of gender and identity politics in postmodern texts.
  • The depiction of postmodern urban landscapes and architecture in literature.
  • The representation of globalization and its effects in postmodern novels.
  • The portrayal of ecological crises and environmental concerns in postmodern fiction.
  • The critique of scientific rationalism and technology in postmodern literature.
  • The exploration of linguistic experimentation and its impact on narrative.
  • The role of the anti-hero and flawed protagonists in postmodern stories.
  • The depiction of social fragmentation and alienation in postmodern works.
  • The representation of non-linear time and its effect on narrative perspective.
  • The portrayal of the dissolution of boundaries between high and low culture.
  • The use of parody and satire to critique political and social norms.
  • The exploration of subjectivity and the breakdown of the authorial voice.
  • The role of performance and spectacle in postmodern drama.
  • The depiction of marginalization and minority voices in postmodern literature.
  • The representation of the interplay between virtual and physical realities.
  • The portrayal of ephemeral and transient experiences in postmodern texts.
  • The critique of capitalism and neoliberal economics in postmodern narratives.
  • The exploration of human relationships in the context of media saturation.
  • The depiction of dystopian societies and their critiques of contemporary issues.
  • The role of surreal and absurd elements in postmodern storytelling.
  • The portrayal of cultural pastiches and their implications for identity formation.
  • The exploration of narrative unreliability and ambiguous truths.
  • The depiction of multiple realities and parallel universes in postmodern fiction.
  • The representation of anarchism and resistance in postmodern literature.
  • The critique of colonial narratives and their postmodern reevaluations.
  • The exploration of therapeutic narratives in postmodern psychology and literature.
  • The role of chance and randomness in the structure of postmodern plots.
  • The portrayal of artistic and cultural decadence in postmodern settings.
  • The impact of humanism on the themes and forms of Renaissance poetry.
  • The influence of Renaissance art on the literature of the period.
  • The role of court patronage in the development of literary forms during the Renaissance.
  • The depiction of love and courtship in Shakespeare’s comedies.
  • The use of classical myths in Renaissance drama.
  • The portrayal of political power in the plays of Christopher Marlowe.
  • The evolution of the sonnet form from Petrarch to Shakespeare.
  • The representation of women in Renaissance literature and the role of gender.
  • The impact of the Reformation on English literature during the Renaissance.
  • The development of narrative prose during the Renaissance.
  • The influence of Italian literature on English Renaissance writers.
  • The role of allegory in Spenser’s The Faerie Queene .
  • The depiction of the supernatural in Renaissance drama.
  • The exploration of identity and self in Renaissance autobiographical writings.
  • The rise of satire and its development during the English Renaissance.
  • The concept of the tragic hero in Renaissance tragedy.
  • The role of travel and exploration narratives in shaping Renaissance literature.
  • The influence of Machiavellian philosophy on Renaissance literary characters.
  • The representation of religious conflicts and sectarianism in Renaissance texts.
  • The depiction of colonialism and its early impacts in Renaissance literature.
  • The portrayal of the city and urban life in Renaissance literature.
  • The use of rhetoric and persuasion in the sermons and speeches of the Renaissance.
  • The depiction of friendship and societal bonds in Renaissance literature.
  • The influence of Renaissance music on the poetic forms of the time.
  • The role of magic and science in the literature of the Renaissance.
  • The treatment of classical philosophy in Renaissance humanist literature.
  • The representation of nature and the environment in pastoral literature.
  • The depiction of courtly and peasant life in Renaissance drama.
  • The influence of Renaissance literature on later literary movements.
  • The portrayal of villains and their motivations in Renaissance plays.
  • The development of printing technology and its impact on Renaissance literature.
  • The role of language and dialect in the literature of the English Renaissance.
  • The depiction of the New World in Renaissance travel literature.
  • The exploration of moral and ethical issues in Renaissance philosophical writings.
  • The impact of Spanish literature on the Renaissance literary scene.
  • The role of soliloquies in deepening character development in Renaissance drama.
  • The treatment of death and mortality in Renaissance poetry.
  • The representation of court politics and intrigue in Renaissance historical plays.
  • The development of comedic elements in Renaissance literature.
  • The exploration of Renaissance literary criticism and its approaches to interpretation.
  • The exploration of nature and the sublime in Romantic poetry.
  • The role of the individual and personal emotion in Romantic literature.
  • The impact of the French Revolution on Romantic literary themes.
  • The representation of the Byronic hero in Romantic novels.
  • The influence of Gothic elements on Romantic literature.
  • The depiction of women and femininity in the works of Romantic poets.
  • The role of imagination and creativity in Romantic theories of art and literature.
  • The portrayal of childhood and innocence in Romantic literature.
  • The influence of Eastern cultures on Romantic poetry and prose.
  • The interplay between science and religion in Romantic texts.
  • The Romantic fascination with death and the macabre.
  • The depiction of landscapes and rural life in Romantic poetry.
  • The role of folklore and mythology in shaping Romantic narratives.
  • The impact of Romanticism on national identities across Europe.
  • The exploration of exile and alienation in Romantic literature.
  • The critique of industrialization and its social impacts in Romantic writing.
  • The development of the historical novel in Romantic literature.
  • The role of letters and correspondence in Romantic literary culture.
  • The representation of revolutionary ideals and their disillusionment in Romantic texts.
  • The exploration of human rights and liberty in Romantic works.
  • The portrayal of artistic genius and its torments in Romantic literature.
  • The depiction of friendship and romantic love in Romantic poetry.
  • The influence of Romantic literature on the development of modern environmentalism.
  • The role of music and its inspiration on Romantic poetry.
  • The exploration of time and memory in Romantic literary works.
  • The depiction of urban versus rural dichotomies in Romantic texts.
  • The impact of Romanticism on later literary movements such as Symbolism and Decadence.
  • The role of melancholy and introspection in Romantic poetry.
  • The representation of dreams and visions in Romantic literature.
  • The depiction of storms and natural disasters as metaphors in Romantic writing.
  • The exploration of political reform and radicalism in Romantic works.
  • The portrayal of the supernatural and its role in Romantic narratives.
  • The influence of Romantic literature on the visual arts.
  • The depiction of heroism and adventure in Romantic epics.
  • The role of solitude and contemplation in Romantic poetry.
  • The exploration of national folklore in the Romantic movement across different cultures.
  • The critique of reason and rationality in favor of emotional intuition.
  • The depiction of the quest for immortality and eternal youth in Romantic literature.
  • The role of the pastoral and the picturesque in Romantic aesthetics.
  • The exploration of spiritual and transcendental experiences in Romantic texts.
  • The role of dystopian worlds in critiquing contemporary social issues.
  • The portrayal of artificial intelligence and its ethical implications in science fiction.
  • The evolution of space opera within science fiction literature.
  • The depiction of alternate histories in fantasy literature and their cultural significance.
  • The use of magic systems in fantasy novels as metaphors for real-world power dynamics.
  • The representation of gender and sexuality in speculative fiction.
  • The influence of scientific advancements on the development of science fiction themes.
  • Environmentalism and ecocriticism in science fiction and fantasy narratives.
  • The role of the hero’s journey in modern fantasy literature.
  • The portrayal of utopias and their transformation into dystopias.
  • The impact of post-apocalyptic settings on character development and moral choices.
  • The exploration of virtual reality in science fiction and its implications for the future of society.
  • The representation of alien cultures in science fiction and the critique of human ethnocentrism.
  • The use of mythology and folklore in building fantasy worlds.
  • The influence of cyberpunk culture on contemporary science fiction.
  • The depiction of time travel and its impact on narrative structure and theme.
  • The role of military science fiction in exploring warfare and peace.
  • The portrayal of religious themes in science fiction and fantasy.
  • The impact of fan fiction and its contributions to the science fiction and fantasy genres.
  • The exploration of psychological themes through science fiction and fantasy narratives.
  • The role of colonization in science fiction narratives.
  • The impact of science fiction and fantasy literature on technological innovation.
  • The depiction of societal collapse and reconstruction in speculative fiction.
  • The role of language and linguistics in science fiction, such as in creating alien languages.
  • The portrayal of non-human characters in fantasy literature and what they reveal about human nature.
  • The use of science fiction in exploring philosophical concepts such as identity and consciousness.
  • The representation of disabled characters in science fiction and fantasy.
  • The influence of historical events on the development of fantasy literature.
  • The critique of capitalism and corporate governance in dystopian science fiction.
  • The role of political allegory in science fiction during the Cold War.
  • The representation of indigenous peoples in fantasy settings.
  • The impact of climate change on the settings and themes of speculative fiction.
  • The exploration of bioethics and genetic modification in science fiction.
  • The impact of globalization as seen through science fiction narratives.
  • The role of women authors in shaping modern science fiction and fantasy.
  • The exploration of sentient machines and the definition of life in science fiction.
  • The use of archetypes in fantasy literature and their psychological implications.
  • The narrative strategies used to build suspense and mystery in fantasy series.
  • The influence of Eastern philosophies on Western science fiction.
  • The portrayal of family and community in post-apocalyptic environments.
  • The representation of the British Empire and colonialism in Victorian novels.
  • The impact of the Industrial Revolution on the social landscape in Victorian literature.
  • The depiction of gender roles and the domestic sphere in Victorian novels.
  • The influence of Darwinian thought on Victorian characters and themes.
  • The role of the Gothic tradition in Victorian literature.
  • The portrayal of morality and ethics in the works of Charles Dickens.
  • The exploration of class disparity and social mobility in Victorian fiction.
  • The depiction of urban life and its challenges in Victorian literature.
  • The role of realism in Victorian novels and its impact on literary form.
  • The representation of mental illness and psychology in Victorian fiction.
  • The critique of materialism and consumer culture in Victorian literature.
  • The portrayal of children and childhood in Victorian narratives.
  • The exploration of romanticism versus realism in Victorian poetry.
  • The depiction of religious doubt and spiritual crises in Victorian texts.
  • The role of women writers in the Victorian literary scene.
  • The portrayal of the “New Woman” in late Victorian literature.
  • The exploration of scientific progress and its ethical implications in Victorian works.
  • The depiction of crime and punishment in Victorian detective fiction.
  • The influence of aestheticism and decadence in late Victorian literature.
  • The representation of imperial anxieties and racial theories in Victorian novels.
  • The role of sensation novels in shaping Victorian popular culture.
  • The portrayal of marriage and its discontents in Victorian literature.
  • The depiction of rural life versus urbanization in Victorian narratives.
  • The exploration of philanthropy and social reform in Victorian texts.
  • The role of the supernatural and the occult in Victorian fiction.
  • The portrayal of art and artists in Victorian literature.
  • The representation of travel and exploration in Victorian novels.
  • The depiction of the aristocracy and their decline in Victorian literature.
  • The influence of newspapers and media on Victorian literary culture.
  • The role of patriotism and national identity in Victorian writings.
  • The exploration of the Victorian underworld in literature.
  • The depiction of legal and judicial systems in Victorian fiction.
  • The portrayal of addiction and vice in Victorian texts.
  • The role of foreign settings in Victorian novels.
  • The depiction of technological advancements in transportation in Victorian literature.
  • The influence of French and Russian literary movements on Victorian authors.
  • The role of epistolary form in Victorian novels.
  • The portrayal of altruism and self-sacrifice in Victorian narratives.
  • The depiction of servants and their roles in Victorian households.
  • The exploration of colonial and postcolonial readings of Victorian texts.
  • The role of translation in shaping the global reception of classic literary works.
  • The impact of globalization on the development of contemporary world literature.
  • Comparative analysis of national myths in literature across different cultures.
  • The influence of postcolonial theory on the interpretation of world literature.
  • The depiction of cross-cultural encounters and their implications in world novels.
  • The role of exile and migration in shaping the themes of world literature.
  • The representation of indigenous narratives in the global literary marketplace.
  • The portrayal of urbanization in world literature and its impact on societal norms.
  • The exploration of feminist themes across different cultural contexts in literature.
  • The depiction of historical trauma and memory in literature from post-conflict societies.
  • The role of magical realism in expressing political and social realities in Latin American literature.
  • The exploration of identity and hybridity in diaspora literature from around the world.
  • The impact of censorship and political repression on literary production in authoritarian regimes.
  • Comparative study of the Gothic tradition in European and Latin American literature.
  • The influence of religious texts on narrative structures and themes in world literature.
  • The role of nature and the environment in shaping narrative forms in world literature.
  • The exploration of time and memory in post-Soviet literature.
  • The portrayal of love and marriage across different cultural contexts in world novels.
  • The impact of technological changes on narrative forms and themes in world literature.
  • The exploration of human rights issues through world literature.
  • The depiction of war and peace in Middle Eastern literature.
  • Comparative analysis of the tragic hero in Greek tragedy and Japanese Noh theater.
  • The role of traditional folk stories in contemporary world literature.
  • The influence of African oral traditions on modern African literature.
  • The exploration of social justice and activism in world literature.
  • The portrayal of children and childhood in world literature.
  • The depiction of the supernatural and the uncanny in world literary traditions.
  • The impact of colonial histories on contemporary literature in former colonies.
  • The exploration of gender and sexuality in Scandinavian literature.
  • The portrayal of disability and mental health in world literature.
  • The role of food and cuisine in cultural identity as depicted in world literature.
  • Comparative study of poetry from the Middle Eastern and Western traditions.
  • The exploration of death and the afterlife in world religious texts and their literary influences.
  • The portrayal of the artist and the creative process in world literature.
  • The impact of economic crises on characters and plot development in world novels.
  • The exploration of architectural spaces and their symbolism in world literature.
  • The role of multilingualism and code-switching in narrative development in world literature.
  • The depiction of aging and intergenerational relationships in world novels.
  • The influence of classical Chinese literature on East Asian modern narratives.
  • The role of the sea and maritime culture in world literary traditions.
  • The portrayal of identity and self-discovery in YA literature.
  • The representation of mental health issues in YA novels.
  • The evolution of the coming-of-age narrative in modern YA fiction.
  • The role of dystopian settings in YA literature as metaphors for adolescent struggles.
  • The depiction of family dynamics and their impact on young protagonists.
  • The treatment of romance and relationships in YA fiction.
  • The exploration of LGBTQ+ themes and characters in YA literature.
  • The impact of social media and technology on character development in YA novels.
  • The portrayal of bullying and social exclusion in YA fiction.
  • The representation of racial and cultural diversity in YA literature.
  • The use of fantasy and supernatural elements to explore real-world issues in YA fiction.
  • The role of friendship in character development and plot progression in YA novels.
  • The depiction of resilience and personal growth in YA protagonists.
  • The influence of YA literature on young readers’ attitudes towards social issues.
  • The portrayal of disability and inclusivity in YA narratives.
  • The role of sports and extracurricular activities in shaping YA characters.
  • The exploration of historical events through YA historical fiction.
  • The impact of war and conflict on young characters in YA literature.
  • The depiction of academic pressure and its consequences in YA novels.
  • The portrayal of artistic expression as a form of coping and identity in YA literature.
  • The use of alternate realities and time travel in YA fiction to explore complex themes.
  • The role of villainy and moral ambiguity in YA narratives.
  • The exploration of environmental and ecological issues in YA literature.
  • The portrayal of heroism and leadership in YA novels.
  • The impact of grief and loss on YA characters and their journey.
  • The depiction of addiction and recovery narratives in YA literature.
  • The portrayal of economic disparities and their effects on young characters.
  • The representation of non-traditional family structures in YA novels.
  • The exploration of self-empowerment and activism in YA literature.
  • The depiction of crime and justice in YA mystery and thriller genres.
  • The role of mythology and folklore in crafting YA fantasy narratives.
  • The portrayal of exile and migration in YA fiction.
  • The impact of YA literature in promoting literacy and reading habits among teens.
  • The exploration of gender roles and expectations in YA novels.
  • The depiction of peer pressure and its influence on YA characters.
  • The portrayal of escapism and adventure in YA fiction.
  • The role of magical realism in conveying psychological and emotional truths in YA literature.
  • The exploration of ethical dilemmas and moral choices in YA narratives.
  • The depiction of the future and speculative technology in YA science fiction.
  • The portrayal of societal norms and rebellion in YA dystopian novels.

We hope this comprehensive list of literature thesis topics empowers you to narrow down your choices and sparks your curiosity in a specific area of literary studies. With 1000 unique topics spread across 25 categories, from traditional to emerging fields, there is something here for every literary scholar. The diversity of topics not only reflects the dynamic nature of literature but also encompasses a range of perspectives and cultural backgrounds, ensuring that every student can find a topic that resonates deeply with their scholarly interests and personal passions. Utilize this resource to embark on a thought-provoking and intellectually rewarding thesis writing journey.

Literature and Thesis Topic Potential

Literature encompasses a vast and vibrant spectrum of themes and narrative techniques that mirror, critique, and reshape the complex world we live in. For students embarking on the challenging yet rewarding journey of thesis writing, delving into the multitude of literature thesis topics can unlock profound insights and present significant scholarly opportunities. This exploration is not merely an academic exercise; it is a deep dive into the human experience, offering a unique lens through which to view history, culture, and society. Engaging with literature in this way not only enhances one’s understanding of various literary genres and historical periods but also sharpens analytical, critical, and creative thinking skills.

Current Issues in Literature

One prevailing issue in contemporary literary studies is the exploration of identity and representation within literature. This includes examining how narratives portray race, gender, sexuality, and disability. The rise of identity politics has encouraged a reevaluation of canonical texts and a push to broaden the literary canon to include more diverse voices. Such studies challenge traditional narratives and open up discussions on power dynamics within literature.

Another significant issue is the impact of digital technology on literature. The digital age has introduced new forms of literature, such as hypertext fiction and digital poetry, which utilize the interactive capabilities of digital devices to create multifaceted narratives. This shift has led to new interpretations of authorship and readership, as the boundaries between the two blur in interactive media. Thesis topics might explore how these technological innovations have transformed narrative structures and themes or how they affect the psychological engagement of the reader.

Environmental literature has also emerged as a poignant area of study, especially in the context of growing global concerns about climate change and sustainability. This trend in literature reflects an urgent need to address the relationship between humanity and the natural world. Theses in this area could examine narratives that focus on ecological disasters, the anthropocene, or the role of non-human actors in literature, providing new insights into environmental ethics and awareness.

Recent Trends in Literature

The recent trend towards blending genres within literature has led to innovative narrative forms that defy conventional genre classifications. Works that fuse elements of science fiction, fantasy, and historical fiction challenge readers to engage with literature in new and complex ways. These hybrid genres often address contemporary issues through the lens of speculative or fantastical settings, offering fresh perspectives on familiar problems. Thesis topics in this area could explore how these blended genres comment on societal issues or how they represent historical narratives through a fantastical lens.

Another noteworthy trend is the increasing prominence of autobiographical and memoir writing, which highlights personal narratives and individual experiences. This shift towards personal storytelling reflects a broader societal interest in authentic and individualized narratives, often exploring themes of identity, trauma, and resilience. Students could develop thesis topics that analyze how these works serve as both personal catharsis and a social commentary, or how they use narrative techniques to blur the lines between fiction and non-fiction.

Global literature, written in or translated into English, has expanded the geographical boundaries of literary analysis and introduced a plethora of voices and stories from around the world. This trend not only diversifies the range of literary works available but also introduces new themes and narrative strategies influenced by different cultural backgrounds. Thesis research could investigate how global literature addresses universal themes through culturally specific contexts, or how it challenges Western literary paradigms.

Future Directions in Literature

As literature continues to evolve, one of the exciting future directions is the potential integration of literary studies with emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning. These technologies could lead to new forms of literary creation and analysis, where AI-generated literature becomes a field of study, or where machine learning is used to uncover patterns in large volumes of text. Thesis topics might explore the ethical implications of AI in literature, the authenticity of AI-authored texts, or how AI can be used to interpret complex literary theories.

Another future direction is the increasing intersection between literature and other disciplines such as neuroscience, psychology, and anthropology. This interdisciplinary approach can deepen understanding of how literature affects the human brain, influences behavior, or reflects cultural evolution. Students could develop theses that examine the neurocognitive impacts of reading fiction, or how literary studies can contribute to our understanding of human culture and societal development.

Finally, the role of literature in addressing and influencing social and political issues is likely to increase. As global challenges like migration, inequality, and climate change persist, literature that addresses these issues not only provides commentary but also raises awareness and fosters empathy. Future thesis topics could focus on how literature serves as a tool for social justice, how it influences public policy, or how it helps shape collective memory and identity in times of crisis.

The exploration of literature thesis topics offers students a panorama of possibilities for deep academic inquiry and personal growth. By engaging deeply with literature, students not only fulfill their academic objectives but also gain insights that transcend scholarly pursuits. This exploration enriches personal perspectives and fosters a profound appreciation for the power of words and stories. The pursuit of literature thesis topics is thus not merely academic—it is a journey into the heart of human experience, offering endless opportunities for discovery and impact.

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MA in English Theses

Theses/dissertations from 2018 2018.

Implementing Critical Analysis in the Classroom to Negate Southern Stereotypes in Multi-Media , Julie Broyhill

Fan Fiction in the English Language Arts Classroom , Kristen Finucan

Transferring the Mantle: The Voice of the Poet Prophet in the Works of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Emily Dickinson , Heidi Brown Hyde

The Effects of Social Media as Low-Stakes Writing Tasks , Roxanne Loving

Student and Teacher Perceptions of Multiliterate Assignments Utilizing 21st Century Skills , Jessica Kennedy Miller

The Storytellers’ Trauma: A Place to Call Home in Caribbean Literature , Ilari Pass

Post Title IX Representations of Professional Female Athletes , Emily Shaw

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

“Not as She is” but as She is Expected to Be: Representations, Limitations, and Implications of the “Woman” and Womanhood in Selected Victorian Literature and Contemporary Chick Lit. , Amanda Ellen Bridgers

The Intrinsic Factors that Influence Successful College Writing , Kenneth Dean Carlstrom

"Where nature was most plain and pure": The Sacred Locus Amoenus and its Profane Threat in Andrew Marvell's Pastoral Poetry , James Brent King

Colorblind: How Cable News and the “Cult of Objectivity” Normalized Racism in Donald Trump’s Presidential Campaign , Amanda Leeann Shoaf

Gaming The Comic Book: Turning The Page on How Comics and Videogames Intersect as Interactive, Digital Experiences , Joseph Austin Thurmond

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

The Nature, Function, and Value of Emojis as Contemporary Tools of Digital Interpersonal Communication , Nicole L. Bliss-Carroll

Exile and Identity: Chaim Potok's Contribution to Jewish-American Literature , Sarah Anne Hamner

A Woman's Voice and Identity: Narrative Métissage as a Solution to Voicelessness in American Literature , Kali Lauren Oldacre

Pop, Hip Hop, and Empire, Study of a New Pedagogical Approach in a Developmental Reading and English Class , Karen Denise Taylor

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Abandoning the Shadows and Seizing the Stage: A Perspective on a Feminine Discourse of Resistance Theatre as Informed by the Work of Susanna Centlivre, Eliza Haywood, Frances Sheridan, Hannah Cowley, and the Sistren Theatre Collective , Brianna A. Bleymaier

Mexican Immigrants as "Other": An Interdisciplinary Analysis of U.S. Immigration Legislation and Political Cartoons , Olivia Teague Morgan

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

"I Am a Living Enigma - And You Want To Know the Right Reading of Me": Gender Anxiety in Wilkie Collins's The Haunted Hotel and The Guilty River , Hannah Allford

Theses/Dissertations from 2013 2013

Gender Performance and the Reclamation of Masculinity in Frank Miller's Batman: The Dark Knight Returns , John William Salyers Jr.

Theses/Dissertations from 2012 2012

"That's a Lotta Faith We're Putting in a Word": Language, Religion, and Heteroglossia as Oppression and Resistance in Comtemporary British Dystopian Fiction , Haley Cassandra Gambrell

Theses/Dissertations from 2011 2011

Mirroring the Madness: Caribbean Female Development in the Works of Elizabeth Nunez , Lauren Delli Santi

"Atlas Shrugged" and third-wave feminism: An unlikely alliance , Paul McMahan

"Sit back down where you belong, in the corner of my bar with your high heels on": The use of cross-dressing in order to achieve female agency in Shakespeare's transvestite comedies , Heather Lynn Wright

Theses/Dissertations from 2010 2010

Between the Way to the Cross and Emmaus: Deconstructing Identity in the 325 CE Council of Nicaea and "The Shack" , Trevar Simmons

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Home > ARTSSCI > English > dissertations

English Dissertations and Theses

The English Department Dissertations and Theses Series is comprised of dissertations and thesis authored by Marquette University's English Department doctoral and master's students.

Theses/Dissertations from 2023 2023

Lifting the Postmodern Veil: Cosmopolitanism, Humanism, and Decolonization in Global Fictions of the 21st Century , Matthew Burchanoski

Gothic Transformations and Remediations in Cheap Nineteenth-Century Fiction , Wendy Fall

Milton’s Learning: Complementarity and Difference in Paradise Lost , Peter Spaulding

“The Development of the Conceptive Plot Through Early 19th-Century English Novels” , Jannea R. Thomason

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Gonzo Eternal , John Francis Brick

Intertextuality and Sociopolitical Engagement in Contemporary Anglophone Women’s Writing , Jackielee Derks

Innovation, Genre, and Authenticity in the Nineteenth-Century Irish Novel , David Aiden Kenney II

Reluctant Sons: The Irish Matrilineal Tradition of Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, and Flann O’Brien , Jessie Wirkus Haynes

Britain's Extraterrestrial Empire: Colonial Ambition, Anxiety, and Ambivalence in Early Modern Literature , Mark Edward Wisniewski

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Re-Reading the “Culture Clash”: Alternative Ways of Reading in Indian Horse , Hailey Whetten

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

When the Foreign Became Familiar: Modernism, Expatriation, and Spatial Identities in the Twentieth Century , Danielle Kristene Clapham

Reforming Victorian Sense/Abilities: Disabilities in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Social Problem Novels , Hunter Nicole Duncan

Genre and Loss: The Impossibility of Restoration in 20th Century Detective Fiction , Kathryn Hendrickson

A Productive Failure: Existentialism in Fin de Siècle England , Maxwell Patchet

Inquiry and Provocation: The Use of Ambiguity in Sixteenth-Century English Political Satire , Jason James Zirbel

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

No Home but the World: Forced Migration and Transnational Identity , Justice Hagan

The City As a Trap: 20th and 21st Century American Literature and the American Myth of Mobility , Andrew Joseph Hoffmann

The Fantastic and the First World War , Brian Kenna

Insane in the Brain, Blood, and Lungs: Gender-Specific Manifestations of Hysteria, Chlorosis, & Consumption in 19th-Century Literature , Anna P. Scanlon

Reading Multicultural Novels Melancholically: Racial Grief and Grievance in the Joy Luck Club, Beloved, and Anil's Ghost , Jennifer Arias Sweeney

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

The Ethos of Dissent: Epideictic Rhetoric and the Democratic Function of American Protest and Countercultural Literature , Jeffrey Lorino Jr

Literary Cosmopolitanisms of Salman Rushdie, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy , Sunil Samuel Macwan

The View from Here: Toward a Sissy Critique , Tyler Monson

The Forbidden Zone Writers: Femininity and Anglophone Women War Writers of the Great War , Sareene Proodian

Theatrical Weddings and Pious Frauds: Performance and Law in Victorian Marriage Plots , Adrianne A. Wojcik

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

Changing the Victorian Habit Loop: The Body in the Poetry and Painting of Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Morris , Bryan Gast

Gendering Scientific Discourse from 1790-1830: Erasmus Darwin, Thomas Beddoes, Maria Edgeworth, and Jane Marcet , Bridget E. Kapler

Discarding Dreams and Legends: The Short Fiction of Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Flannery O’Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, and Eudora Welty , Katy L. Leedy

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Saving the Grotesque: The Grotesque System of Liberation in British Modernism (1922-1932) , Matthew Henningsen

The Pulpit's Muse: Conversive Poetics in the American Renaissance , Michael William Keller

A Single Man of Good Fortune: Postmodern Identities and Consumerism in the New Novel of Manners , Bonnie McLean

Julian of Norwich: Voicing the Vernacular , Therese Elaine Novotny

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

Homecomings: Victorian British Women Travel Writers And Revisions Of Domesticity , Emily Paige Blaser

From Pastorals to Paterson: Ecology in the Poetry and Poetics of William Carlos WIlliams , Daniel Edmund Burke

Argument in Poetry: (Re)Defining the Middle English Debate in Academic, Popular, and Physical Contexts , Kathleen R. Burt

Apocalyptic Mentalities in Late-Medieval England , Steven A. Hackbarth

The Creation of Heaven in the Middle Ages , William Storm

(re)making The Gentleman: Genteel Masculinities And The Country Estate In The Novels Of Charlotte Smith, Jane Austen, And Elizabeth Gaskell , Shaunna Kay Wilkinson

Theses/Dissertations from 2013 2013

Brides, Department Stores, Westerns, and Scrapbooks--The Everyday Lives of Teenage Girls in the 1940s , Carly Anger

Placed People: Rootedness in G. K. Chesterton, C. S. Lewis, and Wendell Berry , David Harden

Rhetorics Of Girlhood Trauma In Writing By Holly Goddard Jones, Joyce Carol Oates, Sandra Cisneros, And Jamaica Kincaid , Stephanie Marie Stella

Theses/Dissertations from 2012 2012

A Victorian Christmas in Hell: Yuletide Ghosts and Necessary Pleasures in the Age of Capital , Brandon Chitwood

"Be-Holde the First Acte of this Tragedy" : Generic Symbiosis and Cross-Pollination in Jacobean Drama and the Early Modern Prose Novella , Karen Ann Zyck Galbraith

Pamela: Or, Virtue Reworded: The Texts, Paratexts, and Revisions that Redefine Samuel Richardson's Pamela , Jarrod Hurlbert

Violence and Masculinity in American Fiction, 1950-1975 , Magdalen McKinley

Gender Politics in the Novels of Eliza Haywood , Susan Muse

Destabilizing Tradition: Gender, Sexuality, and Postnational Identity in Four Novels by Irish Women, 1960-2000 , Sarah Nestor

Truth Telling: Testimony and Evidence in the Novels of Elizabeth Gaskell , Rebecca Parker Fedewa

Spirit of the Psyche: Carl Jung's and Victor White's Influence on Flannery O'Connor's Fiction , Paul Wakeman

Theses/Dissertations from 2011 2011

Performing the Audience: Constructing Playgoing in Early Modern Drama , Eric Dunnum

Paule Marshall's Critique of Contemporary Neo-Imperialisms Through the Trope of Travel , Michelle Miesen Felix

Hermeneutics, Poetry, and Spenser: Augustinian Exegesis and the Renaissance Epic , Denna Iammarino-Falhamer

Encompassing the Intolerable: Laughter, Memory, and Inscription in the Fiction of John McGahern , John Keegan Malloy

Regional Consciousness in American Literature, 1860-1930 , Kelsey Louise Squire

The Ethics of Ekphrasis: The Turn to Responsible Rhetoric in Mid-Twentieth Century American Poetry , Joshua Scott Steffey

Theses/Dissertations from 2010 2010

Cognitive Architectures: Structures of Passion in Joanna Baillie's Dramas , Daniel James Bergen

On Trial: Restorative Justice in the Godwin-Wollstonecraft-Shelley Family Fictions , Colleen M. Fenno

Theses/Dissertations from 2009 2009

What's the point to eschatology : multiple religions and terminality in James Joyce's Finnegans wake , Martin R. Brick

Economizing Characters: Harriet Martineau and the Problems of Poverty in Victorian Literature, Culture and Law , Mary Colleen Willenbring

Submissions from 2008 2008

"An improbable fiction": The marriage of history and romance in Shakespeare's Henriad , Marcia Eppich-Harris

Bearing the Mark of the Social: Notes Towards a Cosmopolitan Bildungsroman , Megan M. Muthupandiyan

The Gothic Novel and the Invention of the Middle-Class Reader: Northanger Abbey As Case Study , Tenille Nowak

Not Just a Novel of Epic Proportions: Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man As Modern American Epic , Dana Edwards Prodoehl

Recovering the Radicals: Women Writers, Reform, and Nationalist Modes of Revolutionary Discourse , Mark J. Zunac

Theses/Dissertations from 2007 2007

"The Sweet and the Bitter": Death and Dying in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings , Amy M. Amendt-Raduege

The Games Men Play: Madness and Masculinity in Post-World War II American Fiction, 1946-1964 , Thomas P. Durkin

Denise Levertov: Through An Ecofeminist Lens , Katherine A. Hanson

The Wit of Wrestling: Devotional-Aesthetic Tradition in Christina Rossetti's Poetry , Maria M.E. Keaton

Genderless Bodies: Stigma and the Myth of Womanhood , Ellen M. Letizia

Envy and Jealousy in the Novels of the Brontës: A Synoptic Discernment , Margaret Ann McCann

Technologies of the Late Medieval Self: Ineffability, Distance, and Subjectivity in the Book of Margery Kempe , Crystal L. Mueller

"Finding-- a Map-- to That Place Called Home": The Journey from Silence to Recovery in Patrick McCabe's Carn and Breakfast on Pluto , Valerie A. Murrenus Pilmaier

Emily Dickinson's Ecocentric Pastoralism , Moon-ju Shin

The American Jeremiad in Civil War Literature , Jacob Hadley Stratman

Theses/Dissertations from 2006 2006

Literary Art in Times of Crisis: The Proto-Totalitarian Anxiety of Melville, James, and Twain , Matthew J. Darling

(Re) Writing Genre: Narrative Conventions and Race in the Novels of Toni Morrison , Jennifer Lee Jordan Heinert

"Amsolookly Kersse": Clothing in Finnegan's Wake , Catherine Simpson Kalish

"Do Your Will": Shakespeare's Use of the Rhetoric of Seduction in Four Plays , Jason James Nado

Woman in Emblem: Locating Authority in the Work and Identity of Katherine Philips (1632-1664) , Susan L. Stafinbil

When the Bough Breaks: Poetry on Abortion , Wendy A. Weaver

Theses/Dissertations from 2005 2005

Heroic Destruction: Shame and Guilt Cultures in Medieval Heroic Poetry , Karl E. Boehler

Poe and Early (Un)American Drama , Amy C. Branam

Grammars of Assent: Constructing Poetic Authority in An Age of Science , William Myles Carroll III

This Place is Not a Place: The Constructed Scene in the Works of Sir Walter Scott , Colin J. Marlaire

Cognitive Narratology: A Practical Approach to the Reader-Writer Relationship , Debra Ann Ripley

Theses/Dissertations from 2004 2004

Defoe and the Pirates: Function of Genre Conventions in Raiding Narratives , William J. Dezoma

Creative Discourse in the Eighteenth-Century Courtship Novel , Michelle Ruggaber Dougherty

Exclusionary Politics: Mourning and Modernism in the Works of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Amy Levy, and Charlotte Mew , Donna Decker Schuster

Theses/Dissertations from 2003 2003

Toward a Re-Formed Confession: Johann Gerhard's Sacred Meditations and "Repining Restlessnesse" in the Poetry of George Herbert , Erik P. Ankerberg

Idiographic Spaces: Representation, Ideology and Realism in the Postmodern British Novel , Gordon B. McConnell

Theses/Dissertations from 2002 2002

Reading into It: Wallace Stegner's Novelistic Sense of Time and Place , Colin C. Irvine

Brisbane and Beyond: Revising Social Capitalism in Mid-Nineteenth-Century America , Michael C. Mattek

Theses/Dissertations from 2001 2001

Christians and Mimics in W. B. Yeats' Collected Poems , Patrick Mulrooney

Renaissance Roles and the Process of Social Change , John Wieland

'Straunge Disguize': Allegory and Its Discontents in Spenser's Faerie Queene , Galina Ivanovna Yermolenko

Theses/Dissertations from 2000 2000

Reading American Women's Autobiography: Spheres of Identity, Spheres of Influence , Amy C. Getty

"Making Strange": The Art and Science of Selfhood in the Works of John Banville , Heather Maureen Moran

Writing Guadalupe: Mediacion and (mis)translation in borderland text(o)s , Jenny T Olin-Shanahan

Writing Guadalupe: Mediacion and (Mis)Translation in Borderland Text(o)s , Jenny T. Olin-Shanahan

Theses/Dissertations from 1999 1999

Setting the Word Against the Word: The Search for Self-Understanding in Richard II , Richard J. Erable

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Home > College of Arts and Sciences > English Language and Literature > Master's Theses

Master's Theses - English Language and Literature

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

“Hideous things have happened here”: Rape myths, rape culture, and healing in adolescent literature , Holly J. Greca

Moments of excess: Type 1 diabetes and the myth of control in adolescent fiction for girls , Michelle E. LeGault

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

A sociophonetic analysis of female-sounding virtual assistants , Alyssa Allen

Vampire narratives: Looking at queer-centric experiences in comparison to hetero-centric norms in order to model a new queer vampiric experience , Marah Heikkila

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Overhearers’ perceptions of familiarity between interlocutors in computer-mediated communication based on GIF usage , Alexa F. Druckmiller

Feminism by proxy: Jane Austen’s critique of patriarchal society in Pride and Prejudice and Emma , Alexis Miller

The memory of mythmaking: Transgenerational trauma and disability as a collective experience in Afrofuturist storytelling , Jessica Tapley

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Body image/imagining bodies: Trauma, control, and healing in graphic memoirs about anorexia , Kristine M. Gatchel

Word-final /t/-release and linguistic style: An investigation of the speech of two Jewish women from metro Detroit , Janet Leppala

Hermione syndrome: Reexamining feminist sidekicks and power in 2000-2010 children’s and young adult fantasy literature , Josiah Pankiewicz

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Fear and (non) fiction: Agrarian anxiety in “The Colour Out of Space” , Antonio Barroso

Sculpted from clay, shaped by power: Feminine narrative and agency in Wonder Woman , Mikala Carpenter

Players in a storm: Climate and political migrants in The Tempest and Othello , Darcie Rees

Reclaiming racial/ethnic identity vs. reconstructing Asian American masculinity in Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese , Hyun-Joo Yoo

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

The organization of turn-taking in fieldwork settings: A case study , Amy Brunett

Exploring the political impact of literature and literary studies in American government , Taylor Dereadt

"We met in a bar by happenstance": Master narratives in couples stories , Brent A. Miller

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

What is the negro woman's story?: Negro Story Magazine and the dialogue of feminist voices , Maureen Convery

Illustrating adolescent awareness: Teaching historical injustices and promoting agency through picture books in secondary classrooms , Melissa Hoak

Phonemic inventory of the Shor language , Uliana Kazagasheva

Cannibalism in contact narratives and the evolution of the wendigo , Michelle Lietz

Parody and the pen: Pippi Longstocking, Harriet M. Welsch, and Flavia de Luce as disrupters of space, language, and the male gaze , Kelsey McLendon

Haec fortis sequitur illam indocti possident: A linguistic analysis of demonstratives in genres of early Latin fragments , Erica L. Meszaros

Tricking for change: Establishing the literary trickster in the western tradition , Christopher Michael Stuart

Because, x: A new construction of because in popular culture , Stephanie Walla

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Digital Commons @ USF > College of Arts and Sciences > English > Theses and Dissertations

English Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Of Mētis and Cuttlefish: Employing Collective Mētis as a Theoretical Framework for Marginalized Communities , Justiss Wilder Burry

What on earth are we doing (?): A Field-Wide Exploration of Design Courses in TPC , Jessica L. Griffith

Organizations Ensuring Resilience: A Case Study of Cortez, Florida , Karla Ariel Maddox

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Using Movie Clips to Understand Vivid-Phrasal Idioms’ Meanings , Rasha Salem S. Alghamdi

An Exercise in Exceptions: Personhood, Divergency, and Ableism in the STAR TREK Franchise , Jessica A. Blackman

Vulnerable Resistance in Victorian Women’s Writing , Stephanie A. Harper

Curricular Assemblages: Understanding Student Writing Knowledge (Re)circulation Across Genres , Adam Phillips

PAD Beyond the Classroom: Integrating PAD in the Scrum Workplace , Jade S. Weiss

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Social Cues in Animated Pedagogical Agents for Second Language Learners: the Application of The Embodiment Principle in Video Design , Sahar M. Alyahya

A Field-Wide Examination of Cross-Listed Courses in Technical Professional Communication , Carolyn M. Gubala

Labor-Based Grading Contracts in the Multilingual FYC Classroom: Unpacking the Variables , Kara Kristina Larson

Land Goddesses, Divine Pigs, and Royal Tricksters: Subversive Mythologies and Imperialist Land Ownership Dispossession in Twentieth Century Irish and American Literature , Elizabeth Ricketts

Oppression, Resistance, and Empowerment: The Power Dynamics of Naming and Un-naming in African American Literature, 1794 to 2019 , Melissa "Maggie" Romigh

Generic Expectations in First Year Writing: Teaching Metadiscoursal Reflection and Revision Strategies for Increased Generic Uptake of Academic Writing , Kaelah Rose Scheff

Reframing the Gothic: Race, Gender, & Disability in Multiethnic Literature , Ashely B. Tisdale

Intersections of Race and Place in Short Fiction by New Orleans Gens de Couleur Libres , Adrienne D. Vivian

Mental Illness Diagnosis and the Construction of Stigma , Katie Lynn Walkup

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Rhetorical Roundhouse Kicks: Tae Kwon Do Pumsae Practice and Non-Western Embodied Topoi , Spencer Todd Bennington

9/11 Then and Now: How the Performance of Memorial Rhetoric by Presidents Changes to Construct Heroes , Kristen M. Grafton

Kinesthetically Speaking: Human and Animal Communication in British Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century , Dana Jolene Laitinen

Exploring Refugee Students’ Second Language (L2) Motivational Selves through Digital Visual Representations , Nhu Le

Glamour in Contemporary American Cinema , Shauna A. Maragh

Instrumentalization Theory: An Analytical Heuristic for a Heightened Social Awareness of Machine Learning Algorithms in Social Media , Andrew R. Miller

Intercessory Power: A Literary Analysis of Ethics and Care in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon , Alice Walker’s Meridian , and Toni Cade Bambara’s Those Bones Are Not My Child , Kelly Mills

The Power of Non-Compliant Logos: A New Materialist Approach to Comic Studies , Stephanie N. Phillips

Female Identity and Sexuality in Contemporary Indonesian Novels , Zita Rarastesa

"The Fiery Furnaces of Hell": Rhetorical Dynamism in Youngstown, OH , Joshua M. Rea

“We developed solidarity”: Family, Race, Identity, and Space-Time in Recent Multiethnic U.S. American Fiction , Kimber L. Wiggs

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

Remembrance of a Wound: Ethical Mourning in the Works of Ana Menéndez, Elías Miguel Muñoz, and Junot Díaz , José Aparicio

Taking an “Ecological Turn” in the Evaluation of Rhetorical Interventions , Peter Cannon

New GTA’s and the Pre-Semester Orientation: The Need for Informed Refinement , Jessica L. Griffith

Reading Rape and Answering with Empathy: A New Approach to Sexual Assault Education for College Students , Brianna Jerman

The Karoo , The Veld , and the Co-Op: The Farm as Microcosm and Place for Change in Schreiner, Lessing, and Head , Elana D. Karshmer

"The weak are meat, and the strong do eat"; Representations of the Slaughterhouse in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature , Stephanie Lance

Language of Carnival: How Language and the Carnivalesque Challenge Hegemony , Yulia O. Nekrashevich

Queer Authority in Old and Middle English Literature , Elan J. Pavlinich

Because My Garmin Told Me To: A New Materialist Study of Agency and Wearable Technology , Michael Repici

No One Wants to Read What You Write: A Contextualized Analysis of Service Course Assignments , Tanya P. Zarlengo

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Beauty and the Beasts: Making Places with Literary Animals of Florida , Haili A. Alcorn

The Medievalizing Process: Religious Medievalism in Romantic and Victorian Literature , Timothy M. Curran

Seeing Trauma: The Known and the Hidden in Nineteenth-Century Literature , Alisa M. DeBorde

Analysis of User Interfaces in the Sharing Economy , Taylor B. Johnson

Border-Crossing Travels Across Literary Worlds: My Shamanic Conscientization , Scott Neumeister

The Spectacle of The Bomb: Rhetorical Analysis of Risk of The Nevada Test Site in Technical Communication, Popular Press, and Pop Culture , Tiffany Wilgar

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Traveling Women and Consuming Place in Eighteenth-Century Travel Letters and Journals , Cassie Patricia Childs

“The Nations of the Field and Wood”: The Uncertain Ontology of Animals in Eighteenth-Century British Literature , J. Kevin Jordan

Modern Mythologies: The Epic Imagination in Contemporary Indian Literature , Sucheta Kanjilal

Science in the Sun: How Science is Performed as a Spatial Practice , Natalie Kass

Body as Text: Physiognomy on the Early English Stage , Curtis Le Van

Tensions Between Democracy and Expertise in the Florida Keys , Elizabeth A. Loyer

Institutional Review Boards and Writing Studies Research: A Justice-Oriented Study , Johanna Phelps-Hillen

The Spirit of Friendship: Girlfriends in Contemporary African American Literature , Tangela La'Chelle Serls

Aphra Behn on the Contemporary Stage: Behn's Feminist Legacy and Woman-Directed Revivals of The Rover , Nicole Elizabeth Stodard

(Age)ncy in Composition Studies , Alaina Tackitt

Constructing Health Narratives: Patient Feedback in Online Communities , Katie Lynn Walkup

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

Rupturing the World of Elite Athletics: A Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis of the Suspension of the 2011 IAAF Regulations on Hyperandrogenism , Ella Browning

Shaping Climate Citizenship: The Ethics of Inclusion in Climate Change Communication and Policy , Lauren E. Cagle

Drop, Cover, and Hold On: Analyzing FEMA's Risk Communication through Visual Rhetoric , Samantha Jo Cosgrove

Material Expertise: Applying Object-oriented Rhetoric in Marine Policy , Zachary Parke Dixon

The Non-Identical Anglophone Bildungsroman : From the Categorical to the De-Centering Literary Subject in the Black Atlantic , Jarad Heath Fennell

Instattack: Instagram and Visual Ad Hominem Political Arguments , Sophia Evangeline Gourgiotis

Hospitable Climates: Representations of the West Indies in Eighteenth-Century British Literature , Marisa Carmen Iglesias

Chosen Champions: Medieval and Early Modern Heroes as Postcolonial Reactions to Tensions between England and Europe , Jessica Trant Labossiere

Science, Policy, and Decision Making: A Case Study of Deliberative Rhetoric and Policymaking for Coastal Adaptation in Southeast Florida , Karen Patricia Langbehn

A New Materialist Approach to Visual Rhetoric in PhotoShopBattles , Jonathan Paul Ray

Tracing the Material: Spaces and Objects in British and Irish Modernist Novels , Mary Allison Wise

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Representations of Gatsby: Ninety Years of Retrospective , Christine Anne Auger

Robust, Low Power, Discrete Gate Sizing , Anthony Joseph Casagrande

Wrestling with Angels: Postsecular Contemporary American Poetry , Paul T. Corrigan

#networkedglobe: Making the Connection between Social Media and Intercultural Technical Communication , Laura Anne Ewing

Evidence of Things Not Seen: A Semi-Automated Descriptive Phrase and Frame Analysis of Texts about the Herbicide Agent Orange , Sarah Beth Hopton

'She Shall Not Be Moved': Black Women's Spiritual Practice in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Beloved, Paradise, and Home , Rondrea Danielle Mathis

Relational Agency, Networked Technology, and the Social Media Aftermath of the Boston Marathon Bombing , Megan M. Mcintyre

Now, We Hear Through a Voice Darkly: New Media and Narratology in Cinematic Art , James Anthony Ricci

Navigating Collective Activity Systems: An Approach Towards Rhetorical Inquiry , Katherine Jesse Royce

Women's Narratives of Confinement: Domestic Chores as Threads of Resistance and Healing , Jacqueline Marie Smith

Domestic Spaces in Transition: Modern Representations of Dwelling in the Texts of Elizabeth Bowen , Shannon Tivnan

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

Paradise Always Already Lost: Myth, Memory, and Matter in English Literature , Elizabeth Stuart Angello

Overcoming the 5th-Century BCE Epistemological Tragedy: A Productive Reading of Protagoras of Abdera , Ryan Alan Blank

Acts of Rebellion: The Rhetoric of Rogue Cinema , Adam Breckenridge

Material and Textual Spaces in the Poetry of Montagu, Leapor, Barbauld, and Robinson , Jessica Lauren Cook

Decolonizing Shakespeare: Race, Gender, and Colonialism in Three Adaptations of Three Plays by William Shakespeare , Angela Eward-Mangione

Risk of Compliance: Tracing Safety and Efficacy in Mef-Lariam's Licensure , Julie Marie Gerdes

Beyond Performance: Rhetoric, Collective Memory, and the Motive of Imprinting Identity , Brenda M. Grau

Subversive Beauty - Victorian Bodies of Expression , Lisa Michelle Hoffman-Reyes

Integrating Reading and Writing For Florida's ESOL Program , George Douglas Mcarthur

Responsibility and Responsiveness in the Novels of Ann Radcliffe and Mary Shelley , Katherine Marie McGee

Ghosts, Orphans, and Outlaws: History, Family, and the Law in Toni Morrison's Fiction , Jessica Mckee

The "Defective" Generation: Disability in Modernist Literature , Deborah Susan Mcleod

Science Fiction/Fantasy and the Representation of Ethnic Futurity , Joy Ann Sanchez-Taylor

Hermes, Technical Communicator of the Gods: The Theory, Design, and Creation of a Persuasive Game for Technical Communication , Eric Walsh

Theses/Dissertations from 2013 2013

Rhetorical Spirits: Spirituality as Rhetorical Device in New Age Womanist of Color Texts , Ronisha Witlee Browdy

Disciplinarity, Crisis, and Opportunity in Technical Communication , Jason Robert Carabelli

The Terror of Possibility: A Re-evaluation and Reconception of the Sublime Aesthetic , Kurt Fawver

Unbearable Weight, Unbearable Witness: The (Im)possibility of Witnessing Eating Disorders in Cyberspace , Kristen Nicole Gay

the post- 9/11 aesthetic: repositioning the zombie film in the horror genre , Alan Edward Green, Jr.

An(other) Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and the Rhetorical Tradition , Kathleen Sandell Hardesty

Mapping Dissertation Genre Ecology , Kate Lisbeth Pantelides

Dead Man's Switch: Disaster Rhetorics in a Posthuman Age , Daniel Patrick Richards

"Of That Transfigured World" : Realism and Fantasy in Victorian Literature , Benjamin Jude Wright

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Humanities LibreTexts

8.3: Literary Thesis Statements

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  • Page ID 101132

  • Heather Ringo & Athena Kashyap
  • City College of San Francisco via ASCCC Open Educational Resources Initiative

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The Literary Thesis Statement

Literary essays are argumentative or persuasive essays. Their purpose is primarily analysis, but analysis for the purposes of showing readers your interpretation of a literary text. So the thesis statement is a one to two sentence summary of your essay's main argument, or interpretation.

Just like in other argumentative essays, the thesis statement should be a kind of opinion based on observable fact about the literary work.

Thesis Statements Should Be

  • This thesis takes a position. There are clearly those who could argue against this idea.
  • Look at the text in bold. See the strong emphasis on how form (literary devices like symbolism and character) acts as a foundation for the interpretation (perceived danger of female sexuality).
  • Through this specific yet concise sentence, readers can anticipate the text to be examined ( Huckleberry Finn) , the author (Mark Twain), the literary device that will be focused upon (river and shore scenes) and what these scenes will show (true expression of American ideals can be found in nature).

Thesis Statements Should NOT Be

  • While we know what text and author will be the focus of the essay, we know nothing about what aspect of the essay the author will be focusing upon, nor is there an argument here.
  • This may be well and true, but this thesis does not appear to be about a work of literature. This could be turned into a thesis statement if the writer is able to show how this is the theme of a literary work (like "Girl" by Jamaica Kincaid) and root that interpretation in observable data from the story in the form of literary devices.
  • Yes, this is true. But it is not debatable. You would be hard-pressed to find someone who could argue with this statement. Yawn, boring.
  • This may very well be true. But the purpose of a literary critic is not to judge the quality of a literary work, but to make analyses and interpretations of the work based on observable structural aspects of that work.
  • Again, this might be true, and might make an interesting essay topic, but unless it is rooted in textual analysis, it is not within the scope of a literary analysis essay. Be careful not to conflate author and speaker! Author, speaker, and narrator are all different entities! See: intentional fallacy.

Thesis Statement Formula

One way I find helpful to explain literary thesis statements is through a "formula":

Thesis statement = Observation + Analysis + Significance

  • Observation: usually regarding the form or structure of the literature. This can be a pattern, like recurring literary devices. For example, "I noticed the poems of Rumi, Hafiz, and Kabir all use symbols such as the lover's longing and Tavern of Ruin "
  • Analysis: You could also call this an opinion. This explains what you think your observations show or mean. "I think these recurring symbols all represent the human soul's desire." This is where your debatable argument appears.
  • Significance: this explains what the significance or relevance of the interpretation might be. Human soul's desire to do what? Why should readers care that they represent the human soul's desire? "I think these recurring symbols all show the human soul's desire to connect with God. " This is where your argument gets more specific.

Thesis statement: The works of ecstatic love poets Rumi, Hafiz, and Kabir use symbols such as a lover’s longing and the Tavern of Ruin to illustrate the human soul’s desire to connect with God .

Thesis Examples

SAMPLE THESIS STATEMENTS

These sample thesis statements are provided as guides, not as required forms or prescriptions.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Literary Device Thesis Statement

The thesis may focus on an analysis of one of the elements of fiction, drama, poetry or nonfiction as expressed in the work: character, plot, structure, idea, theme, symbol, style, imagery, tone, etc.

In “A Worn Path,” Eudora Welty creates a fictional character in Phoenix Jackson whose determination, faith, and cunning illustrate the indomitable human spirit.

Note that the work, author, and character to be analyzed are identified in this thesis statement. The thesis relies on a strong verb (creates). It also identifies the element of fiction that the writer will explore (character) and the characteristics the writer will analyze and discuss (determination, faith, cunning).

The character of the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet serves as a foil to young Juliet, delights us with her warmth and earthy wit, and helps realize the tragic catastrophe.

The Genre / Theory Thesis Statement

The thesis may focus on illustrating how a work reflects the particular genre’s forms, the characteristics of a philosophy of literature, or the ideas of a particular school of thought.

“The Third and Final Continent” exhibits characteristics recurrent in writings by immigrants: tradition, adaptation, and identity.

Note how the thesis statement classifies the form of the work (writings by immigrants) and identifies the characteristics of that form of writing (tradition, adaptation, and identity) that the essay will discuss.

Samuel Beckett’s Endgame reflects characteristics of Theatre of the Absurd in its minimalist stage setting, its seemingly meaningless dialogue, and its apocalyptic or nihilist vision.

A close look at many details in “The Story of an Hour” reveals how language, institutions, and expected demeanor suppress the natural desires and aspirations of women.

Generative Questions

One way to come up with a riveting thesis statement is to start with a generative question. The question should be open-ended and, hopefully, prompt some kind of debate.

  • What is the effect of [choose a literary device that features prominently in the chosen text] in this work of literature?
  • How does this work of literature conform or resist its genre, and to what effect?
  • How does this work of literature portray the environment, and to what effect?
  • How does this work of literature portray race, and to what effect?
  • How does this work of literature portray gender, and to what effect?
  • What historical context is this work of literature engaging with, and how might it function as a commentary on this context?

These are just a few common of the common kinds of questions literary scholars engage with. As you write, you will want to refine your question to be even more specific. Eventually, you can turn your generative question into a statement. This then becomes your thesis statement. For example,

  • How do environment and race intersect in the character of Frankenstein's monster, and what can we deduce from this intersection?

Expert Examples

While nobody expects you to write professional-quality thesis statements in an undergraduate literature class, it can be helpful to examine some examples. As you view these examples, consider the structure of the thesis statement. You might also think about what questions the scholar wondered that led to this statement!

  • "Heart of Darkness projects the image of Africa as 'the other world,' the antithesis of Europe and therefore civilization, a place where man's vaunted intelligence and refinement are finally mocked by triumphant bestiality" (Achebe 3).
  • "...I argue that the approach to time and causality in Boethius' sixth-century Consolation of Philosophy can support abolitionist objectives to dismantle modern American policing and carceral systems" (Chaganti 144).
  • "I seek to expand our sense of the musico-poetic compositional practices available to Shakespeare and his contemporaries, focusing on the metapoetric dimensions of Much Ado About Nothing. In so doing, I work against the tendency to isolate writing as an independent or autonomous feature the work of early modern poets and dramatists who integrated bibliographic texts with other, complementary media" (Trudell 371).

Works Cited

Achebe, Chinua. "An Image of Africa" Research in African Literatures 9.1 , Indiana UP, 1978. 1-15.

Chaganti, Seeta. "Boethian Abolition" PMLA 137.1 Modern Language Association, January 2022. 144-154.

"Thesis Statements in Literary Analysis Papers" Author unknown. https://resources.finalsite.net/imag...handout__1.pdf

Trudell, Scott A. "Shakespeare's Notation: Writing Sound in Much Ado about Nothing " PMLA 135.2, Modern Language Association, March 2020. 370-377.

Contributors and Attributions

Thesis Examples. Authored by: University of Arlington Texas. License: CC BY-NC

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Literary Analysis Essay

    Table of contents. Step 1: Reading the text and identifying literary devices. Step 2: Coming up with a thesis. Step 3: Writing a title and introduction. Step 4: Writing the body of the essay. Step 5: Writing a conclusion. Other interesting articles.

  2. 12.6: Literary Thesis Statements

    One way I find helpful to explain literary thesis statements is through a "formula": Thesis statement = Observation + Analysis + Significance. Observation: usually regarding the form or structure of the literature. This can be a pattern, like recurring literary devices. For example, "I noticed the poems of Rumi, Hafiz, and Kabir all use symbols ...

  3. thesis examples

    The thesis may focus on illustrating how a work reflects the particular genre's forms, the characteristics of a philosophy of literature, or the ideas of a particular school of thought. Example: "The Third and Final Continent" exhibits characteristics recurrent in writings by immigrants: tradition, adaptation, and identity.

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  10. PDF AP English Literature and Composition

    • The thesis may be more than one sentence, provided the sentences are in close proximity. • The thesis may be anywhere within the response. • For a thesis to be defensible, the poem must include at least minimal evidence that . could. be used to support that thesis; however, the student need not cite that evidence to earn the thesis point.

  11. Browse by PhD thesis by University of Warwick Department

    PhD thesis, University of Warwick. Al-Issa, Ahmad (1989) Polyphony and the anxiety of influence in the fiction of Henry James. PhD thesis, University of Warwick. Aston, Elaine (1987) Outside the doll's house : a study in images of women in English and French theatre, 1848-1914. PhD thesis, University of Warwick.

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  13. Shodhganga@INFLIBNET: Department of English Literature

    Shodhganga. The Shodhganga@INFLIBNET Centre provides a platform for research students to deposit their Ph.D. theses and make it available to the entire scholarly community in open access. Shodhganga@INFLIBNET. Mahatma Gandhi University.

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  20. Structuring the Essay

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  21. 8.3: Literary Thesis Statements

    The thesis may focus on illustrating how a work reflects the particular genre's forms, the characteristics of a philosophy of literature, or the ideas of a particular school of thought. Example 1: "The Third and Final Continent" exhibits characteristics recurrent in writings by immigrants: tradition, adaptation, and identity.

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