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Doctor of Philosophy, Research School of Social Sciences

A single four year research award offered by the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences

  • Length 4 year full-time
  • Minimum 192 Units
  • Academic plan 9520XPHD
  • Post Nominal PhD
  • CRICOS code 036805K
  • Mixed Field Programmes not els
  • Prof Samantha Bennett
  • Admission & Fees
  • Introduction

Employment Opportunities

Career options, learning outcomes, further information.

  • Additional Information

Admission Requirements

Scholarships.

  • Indicative Fees

Program Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy typically consists of four years of full-time study or part-time equivalent.

The Doctor of Philosophy requires the completion of the following:

  • The submission and successful examination of a thesis of up to 100,000 words.
  • The Doctor of Philosophy requires the completion of at least 12 units of coursework subject to the requirements of your discipline, which will consist of dedicated HDR coursework on theories, and research methods that are relevant to your thesis

Applicants must present at a minimum, an Australian Honours degree or equivalent, with a result of H2A (Second Class Honours Division A), and the approval of an identified supervisor for the research project/thesis. Equivalence may be met by completion of a Master’s degree that includes a significant research component, or by a combination of qualifications and professional experience.

At a minimum, all applicants must meet program-specific academic/non-academic requirements, and the University’s English Language Admission Requirements for Students . Admission to most ANU programs is on a competitive basis. Therefore, meeting all admission requirements does not automatically guarantee entry.

If you think you qualify, check out our  guidance on how to apply .

Indicative fees

For more information see: http://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/costs-fees

For further information on International Tuition Fees see: https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments/international-tuition-fees

Fee Information

All students are required to pay the  Services and amenities fee  (SA Fee)

The annual indicative fee provides an estimate of the program tuition fees for international students and domestic students (where applicable). The annual indicative fee for a program is based on the standard full-time enrolment load of 48 units per year (unless the program duration is less than 48 units). Fees for courses vary by discipline meaning that the fees for a program can vary depending on the courses selected. Course fees are reviewed on an annual basis and typically will increase from year to year. The tuition fees payable are dependent on the year of commencement and the courses selected and are subject to increase during the period of study.

For further information on Fees and Payment please see: https://www.anu.edu.au/students/program-administration/fees-payments

ANU offers a wide range of  scholarships  to students to assist with the cost of their studies.

Eligibility to apply for ANU scholarships varies depending on the specifics of the scholarship and can be categorised by the type of student you are.  Specific scholarship application process information is included in the relevant scholarship listing.

For further information see the  Scholarships  website.

Exceptional research degrees at ANU

The Australian National University provides PhD students with a vibrant research community and outstanding program support . When selecting a research program, an institution's reputation is everything. ANU is one of the world's leading universities, and the smart choice for your research program.

As a PhD student you will work with increased independence, under the direction of a supervisory panel of experts in the field. Your research will make an original and important contribution to human knowledge, research and development .

ANU ranks among the world's very finest universities. Our nearly 100,000 alumni include political, business, government, and academic leaders around the world.

We have graduated remarkable people from every part of our continent, our region and all walks of life.

The Doctor of Philosophy equips graduates to work in a wide variety of areas including academia, public and private sectors and NGO’s.  For further details see the CASS website .

1.The learning outcomes of the program are the specifications as per AQF level 10 Criteria https://www.aqf.edu.au/aqf-levels .

ANU is consistently ranked amongst the best universities in the world for its research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Our students are part of a community of leading researchers and are inspired by intellectual curiosity and scholarly excellence.

Graduate research degrees are available in over 20 disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences within the College of Arts & Social Sciences (CASS).  The major component of the research program is a substantial piece of written work which investigates a particular subject or issue.  A research student works independently under the direction of a primary academic supervisor who forms part of a supervisory panel of academic staff.

Graduate students in the Research School of Social Sciences are located across seven school and centres:  School of Sociology, School of Politics and International Relations, School of Philosophy, School of History, Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, Australian Demographic and Social Research Centre, and Centre for Aboriginal Economic and Policy Research.

See the CASS higher degree research website for more information.

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Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Social Sciences

Undertake a phd in social sciences at flinders.

Understand social forces and power structures, globalisation and sustainability issues.

Pursue an advanced research project in social sciences and expand our understanding of the social, cultural and political forces that shape and steer the world today.

Research supervisors 

How to apply 

Enquire 

Master of Arts (Social Sciences)

Duration: 2 years

Delivery mode: In Person

Location: Bedford Park

CRICOS code:  022482F

Annual fees: 2024: $36,300

Further information on fees listed

Doctor of Philosophy (Social Sciences)

Duration: 4 years

CRICOS code:  006809K

Why undertake a PhD in Social Sciences at Flinders

  • Gain expertise in a specialised area of social sciences and become an international expert in your topic
  • Make a difference to the world. Your research has the potential to improve people’s lives by understanding the social forces and power structures, globalisation, and sustainability issues at play in the world today
  • Explore a fascinating research question that no one has answered before. You will have the opportunity to fill a gap in current knowledge or answer a previously unresolved issue in your field

Your career

A PhD in Social Sciences at Flinders provides a wide range of skills valued in all types of organisations and careers. It will enhance your analytical and communication skills, provide you with skills to quickly learn new concepts and adapt to change, and enhance your time management, organisation and resilience skills.

A PhD is a stepping stone to a career as a professional researcher in the public sector, think tanks, charities, universities, and private corporations. Individuals with PhDs in social sciences are highly sought after for various professions in public and private organisations and have found roles in writing, the law, public service, consulting, advising, teaching and publishing.

Potential occupations include:

  • Consultant or advisor
  • Professional researcher

Potential employers include:

  • Universities
  • Think tanks
  • Public sector
  • Private corporations

Potential research supervisors

Flinders Social Sciences academic staff are recognised as leaders in their fields both in Australia and globally. Our academic supervisors draw on their extensive knowledge and exciting research covering topics related to inequality, and sustainability.

Dr Laura Roberts

Dr Monique Mulholland

Learn what to prepare before approaching a potential research supervisor.

Ready to find the perfect supervisor for your research journey?

Explore Research @ Flinders.

Women's and Gender Studies

Get inspired

From a ba to a phd to the world.

Some stories are so inspirational, you just need to tell them. Dr Ryan Manhire went from school drop-out to a postdoc at one of Europe’s leading ethical centres. Find out how he forged his path with the help of a Bachelor of Arts and Cotutelle Doctoral degree in Philosophy.

Breaking the bias around sex education

Dr Monique Mulholland has always been interested in norms and how people’s views are shaped around sexuality, gender, race and identity – now she is giving young people a voice to shape the curriculum.

How to apply

Review the course rule

Check your eligibility

Find a research supervisor

Find out about scholarships and fees

Prepare your application

Enquire now

If you have a question about how to apply, please review our Frequently Asked Questions before submitting an enquiry.

For all other course enquiries complete the enquiry form.

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The Australian National University

School of Sociology

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Related Sites

  • ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Research School of Social Sciences
  • Australian National Internships Program

Welcome to the School of Sociology

The discipline of Sociology is one of the academic pillars on which The Australian National University was built. The defining characteristic of sociology at ANU since the discipline was first institutionalised in the 1960s has been constructive engagement with the big issues facing Australian and global societies. The discipline’s early focus on issues of inequality, stratification and the experience of migrants living in Australia played a major role in Australia’s official shift to policy frameworks based around the concept of multiculturalism.

The ANU School of Sociology has an exciting program of research and teaching that combines the theoretical and applied dimensions of the discipline. Our research and teaching ethos is orientated to the critical analysis of social transformations; publically-engaged in its aspirations and impact, and dedicated to examining inequality in its various manifestations. We recently achieved a ranking of above world standard in the Excellence in Research for Australia evaluation.

The school's disciplinary strengths are in social, cultural and feminist theory; education; health; digital sociology; risk and consumption; and social research methods. Staff hold a range of category 1 and 2 grants and are engaged in diverse interdisciplinary collaborations, both national and international. Research and teaching themes that crosscut these disciplinary strengths include embodiment and new technologies, mobilities, surveillance, media politics, gender and sexuality, the changing nature of work and inequality.

We recently achieved a ranking of above world standard in the Excellence in Research for Australia evaluation, and in 2020 improved our position, to number 9, in the QS World University Rankings.

ANU provides a unique environment to study sociology. Located in our national seat of government, Canberra, ANU is Australia’s premiere research university and world renowned for its depth and breadth in the social and political sciences. Whether you are interested in studying sociology, enrolling in a research degree, applying for a visiting fellowship or consulting the experts on social change, we welcome your enquiry.

The School of Sociology hold a range of events, lectures, seminars and launches for staff, students and interested people. Please check this web site for upcoming events and the latest news.

Download and read the School of Sociology 2020 Handbook

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  • SOCY_2020_handbook_web.pdf ( PDF , 784.44 KB )

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Updated:   17 March 2024 / Responsible Officer:   Head of School / Page Contact:   CASS Marketing & Communications

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PhD (Global, Urban & Social Studies)

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Cultivate high-level research skills in the humanities and social sciences.

sociology phd australia

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Research Training Scheme

See admissions

AU$31,680 (2024 annual)

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in the humanities and social sciences cultivates high-level skills in research processes, advanced communication skills, analysis and synthesis of knowledge.

You’ll develop and extend your expertise, widen your networks, enhance your career prospects and produce socially useful research. You'll create a thesis or research project that makes a substantial and original contribution to an existing body of knowledge.

Individually supervised research programs are available in three key areas: the social, the urban and the global.

RMIT University has particular expertise in the fields of:

  • urban planning and housing studies
  • sustainability
  • criminology
  • globalisation, languages and cultures studies
  • applied linguistics, translating and interpreting
  • international development and relations
  • community development
  • social and public policy
  • social work.

Through the program you’ll access and nurture industry partnerships and collaboration with other researchers while gaining creative, technical and communication skills to generate and evaluate complex ideas and concepts.

How you will learn

Research at rmit, time spent on research.

Full-time candidates are expected to commit at least four days per week (or at least two days per week for part-time candidates) to their research. The academic year is 48 weeks.

Regular contact with your supervisor

A schedule of meetings with your supervisor/s must be established to assess progress against milestones and timely completion.

Resources, facilities and support

You will have access to the Learning Hub and other online and digital resources through the myRMIT student portal.

You will be part of an active research community and have access to resources and workshops to help you succeed.

School of Graduate Research

The School of Graduate Research works with Schools to further support candidates during their postgraduate research degree.

RMIT University is committed to providing you with an education that strongly links formal learning with professional or vocational practice.

Learning outcomes

The knowledge and skills you will acquire throughout this degree and how they can be applied in your career are described in the  learning outcomes .

Electives and course plan

You will complete this program under academic supervision.

The PhD program is structured to enable you to:

  • complete a compulsory research methods course
  • receive training in research integrity and ethics
  • select studies in qualitative and quantitative research techniques
  • complete a thesis/project which demonstrates your original contribution to the field and your ability to communicate complex or original research for peers and the community to an international standard

You are required to complete:

Research Integrity modules

You are required to complete the online modules:

  • Research integrity
  • Copyright and intellectual property

Research methods for engineering and related disciplines

Research methods courses step you through the literature review and preparing your research proposal for confirmation of candidature. They are taught in large discipline groups.

You may need to complete an ethics module to ensure your research is ethical and responsible.

Research Techniques

You may elect to take (where relevant) electives in qualitative or quantitative research techniques once data collection has begun. You can use your own data to explore different research analysis techniques. Your supervisor will help you decide when you should take these electives.

Co-curricular activities

You are encouraged to participate in activities offered with the university, college and school according to your needs and interests.

This PhD may be undertaken in a project, thesis by publication or thesis mode. Prospective candidates should discuss these modes of submission with their potential supervisor/s.

Course structure

Choose a plan below to find out more about the subjects you will study and the course structure.

*The maximum duration of the PhD program is 4 years full-time and 8 years part-time. However, candidates are expected to complete their program within 3-4 years full-time equivalent and 6-8 years part-time equivalent.

*The maximum duration of the PhD program is 4 years full-time. However, candidates are expected to complete their program within 3-4 years full-time equivalent.

Note: International student visa holders can only study full-time.

This program equips you with a nationally and internationally recognised qualification. Graduates are employed in tertiary academic positions, research centres and institutes, and senior leadership and management positions in a variety of education environments.

You may also be employed in senior leadership and management positions in government, non-government organisations and corporations.

Minimum requirements for admission

Prerequisites, selection tasks.

The minimum requirements for admission to a PhD program are:

  • a bachelor degree requiring at least four years of full-time study in a relevant discipline awarded with honours. The degree should include a research component comprised of a thesis, other research projects or research methodology courses that constitute at least 25% of a full-time academic year (or part-time equivalent). The applicant must have achieved at least a distinction average in the final year;  or
  • a master degree that includes a research component comprised of at least 25% of a full-time academic year (or part-time equivalent) with an overall distinction average or a master degree without a research component with at least a high distinction average;  or
  • evidence of appropriate academic qualifications and/or experience that satisfies the Associate Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Research Training and Development or nominee that the applicant has developed knowledge of the field of study or cognate field and the potential for research sufficient to undertake the proposed program.

At RMIT a grade of distinction represents academic achievement of 70% or higher and a high distinction is 80% or higher.

If you are a current master by research candidate, you are able to apply for a transfer to a doctor of philosophy program through the process prescribed in the  RMIT Higher Degree by Research policy .

These entrance requirements are the minimum academic standard you must meet in order to be eligible to apply for the program. You will need to complete a selection task as part of your application.

A selection process will be conducted in conjunction with the School and supervisors you nominate.

For further information on the steps you need to take to apply for a research program see  How to apply – Research programs .

English language requirements

Research proposal and supervisor.

You must attach a substantive research proposal that is 2 to 5 pages in length which articulates the intent, significance and originality of the proposed topic using the following headings:

a) title / topic b) research questions to be investigated in the context of existing research/literature in the area c) significance and impact of the research d) methodology / research tasks required to undertake the research e) particular needs (e.g. resources, facilities, fieldwork or equipment that are necessary for your proposed research program, if applicable).

Your application will not be considered if you have not discussed your research topic with a proposed senior and associate supervisor or joint senior supervisors. You must provide the names of the academic staff in the school you have applied to and with whom you have discussed your proposed research.

To study this course you will need to complete one of the following English proficiency tests:

  • IELTS (Academic): minimum overall band of 6.5 (with no individual band below 6.0)
  • TOEFL (Internet Based Test - IBT): minimum overall score of 79 (with minimum of 13 in Reading, 12 in Listening, 18 in Speaking and 21 in Writing)
  • Pearson Test of English (Academic) (PTE (A)): minimum score of 58 (with no communication band less than 50)
  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE): minimum of 176 with no less than 169 in any component.

For detailed information on English language requirements and other proficiency tests recognised by RMIT, visit  English language requirements and equivalency information .

Don't meet the English language test scores? Complete an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Advanced Plus Certificate at  RMIT English Worldwide .

You can gain entry to this program from a range of RMIT four year  Bachelor and Honours degrees  or  Postgraduate  or Masters by Research programs.

Fee summary

Fee information for masters by research and doctorate (PhD) programs.

If you are an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or New Zealand citizen you may be eligible for a Research Training Scheme (RTS) place where your tuition costs are funded by the Commonwealth Government under the RTS and you have full exemption from tuition fees.

Acceptance in an RTS place is very competitive and places are granted on the condition that you meet annual progress requirements and complete within the allotted time for your program and your status as a part-time or full-time candidate.

This means a maximum of 2 years for a full-time Masters by Research or 4 years for a PhD (or the equivalent part-time).

Contact the School of Graduate Research for more information.

The  student services and amenities fee (SSAF)  is used to maintain and enhance services and amenities that improve your experience as an RMIT student.

In addition to the SSAF there may be  other expenses  associated with your program.

Income tax deductions

Candidates may be eligible to apply for income tax deductions for education expenses linked to their employment. See the  Australian Taxation Office (ATO) website  for more information.

RMIT awards more than 2000 scholarships every year to recognise academic achievement and assist students from a variety of backgrounds.

The annual tuition fee for 2024 is AU$31,680.

The total indicative tuition fee for 2024 commencement is AU$132,480.

International applicants

  • Fees information  for international candidates looking to study at RMIT's Melbourne campuses.
  • PhD  and  masters by research  fees for international candidates studying offshore. 

Other costs

Important fee information.

Find out more details about  how fees are calculated  and the expected annual increase.

Applying for refunds

Find information on how to apply for a  refund  as a continuing international student.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Looking for answers or more general information.

Use our Frequently Asked Questions to learn about the application process and its equity access schemes, find out how to accept or defer your offer or request a leave of absence, discover information about your fees, refunds and scholarships, and explore the various student support and advocacy services, as well as how to find out more about your preferred program, and more.

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RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.

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Sally Staton and Emma Cooke

What's it like to study a PhD in sociology?

UQ people Published 28 Aug, 2020  ·  7-minute read

Ever wondered what it's like to do a sociology PhD at UQ? Choosing the right pathway can be hard, especially when there are so many unknowns out there.

How do you choose one of the many possible PhD research topics in sociology? How do you find the right supervisor ? How do you  pitch your sociology PhD topic ?

PhD candidate Emma and her supervisor Dr Sally Staton have teamed up to answer some of your questions to help you decide what’s right for you.

Watch Can you understand the sociology of children with a PhD from UQ? on YouTube.

Why did you choose to do a sociology PhD?

Emma: I enjoyed my honours year. But the thing about an honours year is it's quite rushed, so you only really have about 9 months to create your project and then write up your thesis. I had a few things that I wanted to explore in more depth, and the PhD is useful because you have that time to really explore your topic.

What's your favourite thing about being a PhD supervisor?

Sally: I think it's learning about the students and their personalities. Every student comes in with a really different set of skills and life experiences; they don’t all come in the same way and they have different ways that they look at the world. It's really nice to learn with them and go through that journey of understanding what they bring and what I can help bring out.

I have students who think really big; they have big ideas and then you have to bring them down to thinking about all the detail in between. And then other students are so detail orientated and you have to encourage them to think big and own big ideas and be okay with that, so I kind of love that process.

How is your PhD different to your undergraduate studies?

Emma: For the PhD, it’s a lot more independent and you get to have a lot of control over what you want to explore. Something else that's nice is you get to have that relationship with your supervisory team, and it's nice because you have the support around you to explore what you're really interested in.

"Also, with the support of a scholarship , you can kind of treat it like a job working 9 to 5, Monday to Friday, so you can really focus on the topic that you love."

How did you make the progression from a Bachelor of Creative Industries (Dance) to a PhD in psychology/sociology? What sparked a passion for research?

Sally: I have absolutely no idea how I got here. If you had asked me at the beginning of my university studies, when I was studying a degree in dance, I would not have thought I would end up doing a sociology PhD and then becoming a researcher in developmental psychology. That was not the plan.

But I guess as part of my studies I got really interested initially in psychology, so I went from dance to psychology first – I have a degree in psychology also. Then through that I was really interested in research and how research can inform some of the world around us and the decisions we make, particularly around small children.

Emma Cooke and Sally Staton

Emma Cooke discusses potential sociology PhD topics with her supervisor, Dr Sally Staton.

Do you ever draw upon the skills from your first degree in your PhD?

Sally: I actually think I do. Possibly not my dance skills, but certainly the creativity part of it. I do actually think it's part of research. We often think of research as something we do just in a lab and it's very sort of sterile and rigorous. And whilst there is an element of that, a big part of research is that creative spark of asking unique questions and coming up with new ideas, and there's a certain level of creativity required for that, so I don't think it's irrelevant.

What scholarship have you been awarded and how did you find out about it?

Emma: I'm on the research training program scholarship , the RTP, and I found out about it when I applied for the PhD. It's pretty straightforward and it's very helpful to have that support, because that's really what helps you to just focus on your PhD. Even though I do a bit of research assistant work and that's fun, you have to keep that to a minimum because there's always a million shiny distractions. You’re there to do your PhD and that scholarship allows you to really focus on it.

Find out more about PhD scholarships, fellowships and funding .

Who do you think should do a PhD?

Sally : I think anyone who is really interested in a topic or has a burning question that they want to answer or contribute to our understanding of – that's really what it comes down to. It's a big commitment. You commit for 3 years or longer to do a PhD.

"What you need to bring with it is a genuine interest in what you're doing, and then beyond that your supervisors really step in and can help you with all the other skills you need to make that work."

How did you come up with your PhD research topic in sociology?

Emma: It was really just by chance when I started my honours. My honours supervisor at the time told me that she had a project coming up about childcare flexibility. She asked if I'd be interested and I was reading about childcare flexibility and I could see why it’s really important, but the policy analysis wasn't really my passion.

Then I saw one of the project aims was to understand children's perspectives and that really fascinated me, because in my undergraduate degree in sociology, we didn't focus on children's perspectives. That was really exciting for me because I had this whole new literature I was really interested in exploring. Honours was my taste of that body of research and then I got to really explore that more in my PhD.

Emma Cooke, sociology PhD candidate

For Emma, the sociology of early childhood was an obvious choice for her PhD topic.

What made you decide to be Emma's supervisor?

Sally: Emma came to me actually. What resonated for me is that when Emma came in, she was deeply interested and had this idea of what she wanted to do. And I think when people have that passion, you can tell straight away because the way they talk about it is animated, and that was a very easy decision from my perspective. To have someone come to you and articulate what they're interested in, in a way that shows that they're really dedicated and committed to that, made it very easy to say yes.

Emma: I was working as a research assistant for Sally before she became my PhD supervisor.

Sally: I had a little insider knowledge of Emma's skills, which is always helpful.

Emma: That's probably good advice for prospective PhD students. If you’ve finished your honours and you just want to explore a bit of your research topic or suss out who could be a good supervisor, sometimes doing some research assistant work in areas that you're interested in can be a great way to get that foot in the door and take it from there.

Sally: Yeah, and it certainly helps from our end because then we get to know you, know what your skills are and where we can help you.

Discover what makes a good PhD supervisor .

Your research interests include child wellbeing and sociology of children. How did you find a supervisor with aligned interests?

Emma: I found Karen through the Institute for Social Science Researchers newsletter that announced that Professor Karen Thorpe and her team, including Dr. Sally Staton, were moving across to UQ. So I think it's important to read those newsletters. I got the newsletter because I had connections with a friend from honours who forwarded it to me, so that's another example of maintaining those connections; they’re really helpful because people will share resources with you. That was a link to early childhood research, and to complement the team, we also have a sociologist to bring in that sociological perspective.

Sally:  And challenge our thinking because we don't always understand sociology very well, but we're learning a lot.

Emma: I think it's good for me, though, because I'm always thinking about how to explain where I'm coming from. I think it's kind of nice if your supervisor might have a slightly different discipline of expertise, then that's actually good because it always keeps you on your toes. I always have to be thinking about how to explain what I'm doing and why I'm doing it, we're not just accepting that 'oh we're just going to do research in this particular way because that's how it's always been done'. We're always critically evaluating it, and I think that's when the really exciting research ideas come to fruition.

Sally: It's nice for us too because we get opportunities to learn new things that we're not usually exposed to.

Was your undergraduate degree in social science or did your passion to study a PhD in sociology come from somewhere else?

Emma: My undergraduate degree was in sociology, but that was through a Bachelor of Arts . The way the Bachelor of Arts is designed is quite broad, so I got to try a whole bunch of different subjects my first year, and I only discovered sociology in my second semester.

I was really interested in sociology and now my PhD is in the sociology of early childhood. That interest in early childhood all came not from my studies – I did a lot of volunteering with children throughout my undergraduate degree, and a PhD has been useful because I've been able to bring those two interests of early childhood and sociology together.

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Sociology, Social Policy and Social Theory

Sociology, Social Policy and Social Theory at Melbourne

From the changing nature of work to the emergence of new digital technologies and persisting socioeconomic inequalities, our program conducts rigorous research on issues that influence individual lives, family dynamics and social networks within and between communities. We study pressing social issues such as gender, race and health inequality, and labour market disadvantage within and across generations, in Australia and around the globe. This research aims to inform and shape policy, reduce social disadvantage and improve people’s everyday lives.

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Our program seeks to be at the forefront of academic and public debates on issues around social disadvantage and inequality in order to assess, improve and shape more effective policies.

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Our researchers collaborate with numerous scholars from around the globe and have strong alliances with Melbourne Institute (renowned for its HILDA data) and six Faculties within the University of Melbourne through our joint Hallmark Economic and Social Participation Research Initiative . Researchers also have strong links with non-governmental institutions such as Brotherhood of St Laurence and Scope.

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Meet our Sociology, Social Policy and Social Theory staff

Sociology, Social Policy and Social Theory at the University of Melbourne brings together a team of seasoned experts in gender and race issues, diversity and Indigenous studies, inequality, cross-national research and public policy.

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Why choose sociology?

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Staff are highly trained in research methods and we have an excellent reputation for large-scale, longitudinal survey research, ethnomethodological studies of conversation analysis and qualitative research techniques. We are also affiliated with the University’s Institute of Social Science Research, the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security (CEPS), the Australian Social Science Data Archives (ASSDA), the Australian Qualitative Data Archive (AQuA) and the Australian Research Council Network in Spatially Integrated Social Science.

Undergraduate students who study sociology at UQ develop a distinctive set of skills and experiences that are highly sought after by employers. These include rigorous training in research methods and an ability to apply critical thinking and evidence-based research to understand a broad range of phenomena such as social change, modern society and culture, contemporary social institutions, crime and its regulation and the relationship between people and the environment.

Undergraduate

Sociology is offered as:.

  • a minor, or single or extended major in the  Bachelor of Arts
  • a minor, or a single major in the  Diploma in Arts
  • a sequence of elective courses in the  Bachelor of Social Science
  • an elective as part of other degrees offered by UQ
  • a field of study in the  Bachelor of Arts (Honours)

Postgraduate

Similar programs to sociology:.

  • Grad Cert in Community Development
  • Grad Cert in Development Practice
  • Master of Development Practice (#24)
  • Master of Development Practice (#32)

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  • Master of Philosophy (MPhil)
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Satisfy your interest for research and your intellectual curiosity under the supervision of internationally recognised academics.

Our undergraduate study areas

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Systems, structures and social justice

Images of students and the environment they learn in

UNSW School of Education has a strong research program exploring the sociology of education. The Systems, Structures and Social Justice Research Community studies the role of education, broadly construed, in the creation, maintenance and/or disruption of social difference and inequality. 

With a view of education through the prism of sociology, the research focuses on:

  • The equitable operation of primary, secondary and higher education systems
  • How educational institutions socialise young people within broader society 
  • The ways in which teachers’ work can operate to both reinforce and disrupt patterns of inequality
  • Teachers as subject to, as well as constructing, social, cultural and political dynamics in education systems.

Research aims

The Systems, Structures and Social Justice Research Community engages with issues of inequitable provision and unequal outcomes across early childhood, school and higher education, as well as adult and other lifelong learning contexts. The community brings expertise in the analysis of power relations including issues of social class, race, gender and geographic inequalities. It's these shifting, yet enduring concerns with which the sociology of education research community engages.

Current projects

The Systems, Structures and Social Justice Research Community is a newly formed group so we’re yet to launch collective projects. However, ongoing activities include regular meetings (virtually and face-to-face post COVID-19) for sharing and progressing research activity with the view to develop collaborative research projects within and beyond the group. 

In addition, within the group and extending outside of the school are a range of collaborative projects supporting the interests of the sociology of education community. Please see our staff member profiles listed below for further details on these projects and associated publications.

A small collaborative research project is ongoing between  Scientia Fellow Kevin Lowe  and  Dr Sally Baker . This project on Indigenous students and their experiences of higher education will investigate issues impacting on students’ capacity to complete undergraduate courses at university. It plans to investigate issues such as teaching styles, curriculum and university structures. It's intended that this work will complement a broader bodywork undertaken by Sally Baker on higher education and equity, as well as inform the development and thinking behind a recently submitted ARC grant.

Kevin Lowe  is also working with Dr Rose Amazan and Shanna Langdon (EdD candidate) and external collaborators including Dr Greg Vass, Dr Christine Grice and Dr Cathie Burgess to help develop the Aboriginal Voices project. This project has been developed over four years to affect the whole school development and management of education for Aboriginal students. Its key features include:

  • Transformative leadership
  • School and community engagement
  • Pedagogic change 
  • Student voice.

External to the school,  Dr Meghan Stacey  has been working collaboratively with cross-institutional researchers from the University of Sydney, University of Technology Sydney and Curtin University considering teacher workload in contexts of devolution and across variously advantaged schooling sites. Currently this team have a project planned to consider these issues in the context of COVID-19. Stacey also works collaboratively with Associate Professor Nicole Mockler from the University of Sydney in relation to teacher subjectivity within regimes of evidence and data, and has a current ARC Linkage on ‘Time-use, Time Poverty and the Intensification of Teachers’ Work’ with A/Prof Mockler as well as Dr Anna Hogan (UQ) and Prof Greg Thompson (QUT).

A/Prof Scott Eacott  and  A/Prof Richard Niesche  are collaborating with researchers from Deakin, Monash and Curtin Universities on an ARC DP that examines whether greater school autonomy has increased inequalities in the education system. 

For more information, see  School Autonomy Reform and Social Justice in Australian Public Education .

  • Dr Meghan Stacey
  • Dr Sally Baker
  • A/Prof Kevin Lowe
  • Dr Rose Amazan
  • A/Prof Richard Niesche
  • Prof Scott Eacott
  • Shanna Langdon (EdD)
  • Therese Gawthorne (EdD)
  • Sue Foxcroft (EdD)
  • Kris Tong (PhD) 
  • Emma Le Marquand (EdD)
  • Liz Diprose (EdD)
  • Somsuda Savarngatat (PhD)
  • Tierney Marey (PhD) 
  • PVC Indigenous Professor Megan Davis
  • Dr Cathy Burgess (University of Sydney)
  • Dr Greg Vass (Griffith University and adjunct at UNSW)
  • Dr Christine Grice (University of Sydney)
  • A/Prof Nicole Mockler (University of Sydney) 
  • Dr Anna Hogan (University of Queensland)
  • Prof Greg Thompson (Queensland University of Technology)
  • Prof Susan McGrath-Champ (University of Sydney)
  • A/Prof Rachel Wilson (University of Sydney) 
  • Dr Mihajla Gavin (University of Technology Sydney)
  • Dr Scott Fitzgerald (Curtin University)
  • Dr Christina Gowlett (The University of Queensland)
  • A/Prof Loshini Naidoo (Western Sydney University) 
  • Dr Ravinder Sidhu (University of Queensland)

The work of this community feeds into coursework that considers the social dimensions of schooling:

  • EDST1104 – Social Perspectives in Education
  • EDST1108 – Indigenous Perspectives in Education
  • EDST5451 – Educational Policy: Theory and Practice
  • EDST5115 – Indigenous Contexts of Education

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School of Social Sciences

Department of Sociology, Criminology & Gender Studies

Sociology, Criminology & Gender Studies are fields that help us think and question critically and empathetically about society, what changes, what remains the same and whether it is fair. 

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Sociology scrutinizes everyday life, how society is organised and the social problems that arise. Criminology analyses crime and deviance. Gender Studies explores the way society is organised around gender.

Our teaching

We teach students how to be critical thinkers and questioners. Our programs have a rigorous social science methods focus that provide the skills required to examine social issues through quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Sociology covers a wide range of social issues, exploring the assumptions that lie behind key questions. Criminology focuses on understanding why people commit crimes and the social responses to it, including attempts at control. Gender Studies examines femininities, masculinities, and the ways in which gender intersects with other dimensions of power, privilege, and inequality, such as sexuality, race, ethnicity, and social class.

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Our research

The Department of Sociology, Criminology are involved in a range of high impact research.

Staff in the Department of Sociology, Criminology are involved in a range of research projects including:

  • the cultural and institutional processes that shape everyday food and activity practices
  • experience of foster care in Australia from the perspective of those involved, including the children
  • obesity and other eating disorders
  • debates about refugees and trafficking
  • migration and Australian identity
  • political sociology including young people’s relationship with politics and manifestations of ethnic conflict
  • cybercrime, youth delinquency, crime prevention and policing
  • death, dying and end-of-life decision-making
  • public policy for health equity, through Stretton Health Equity

Sociology is the study of human activity in societies - questioning the social world and how it fits together. Use your voice to empower society.

Societies are directly influenced by gender whether we can see it or not. Explore society and the ways in which gender is organised around it.

Criminology

Criminology is the study of crime and deviance – seeking to understand the causes of crime, the extent and consequences of crime, as well as methods of crime prevention.

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Ward, P., Foley, K., Meyer, S., Wilson, C., Warin, M ., Millar, E., . . . Lunnay, B. (2022). The place of alcohol in the ‘wellness toolkits’ of midlife women in different social classes: a qualitative study in South Australia. Sociology of Health and Illness: a journal of medical sociology .

Warin, M. (2022). Flexible Kinship. Medical Anthropology Quarterly: international journal for the cultural and social analysis of health .

Warin, M. J. (2022). Kristeva, anorexia and hunger’s abject desires. In N. Bubandt, & T. Schwarz Wentzer (Eds.), Philosophy on Fieldwork: Case Studies in Anthropological Analysis. Routledge.

Whitten, T ., Cale, J., Nathan, S., Bista, S., Ferry, M., Williams, M., . . . Hayen, A. (2022). Hospitalisation following therapeutic community drug and alcohol treatment for young people with and without a history of criminal conviction. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 231 , 109280.

Allen, Margaret. (2021) '“Though an Englishman, he was a Nationalist”: Border-Crossing and Friendship in late colonial India,' Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History,22(3).

Allen, Margaret. (2021) 'Circling around Pandita Ramabai and "The Little Wives of India,"' in E.Boris, S. Dawson and B.Molony (eds) Engendering Transnational Transgression: From the Intimate to the Global (63-83. Routledge.

Allen, Margaret. (2021) “‘I am a British subject’: Indians in Australia claim rights, 1880-1940” in Jane Carey and Frances Steele (eds.) Colonial Formations . Routledge.

Allen, Margaret. (2021) “Rosemary Wighton 1925-1994”, Australian Dictionary of Biography 19 (ANU Press).

Allison, S., Wade, T., Warin, M ., Long, R., Bastiampillai, T., & Looi, J. C. L. (2021). Tertiary eating disorder services: is it time to integrate specialty care across the life span?. Australasian Psychiatry, 29 (5), 516-518.

Allison, S., Wade, T., Warin, M ., Long, R., Bastiampillai, T., & Looi, J. C. L. (2021). Response to Treasure and Schmidt: joined-up care for youth-onset eating disorders. Australasian Psychiatry , 103985622110435.

Allison, S., Warin, M ., Bastiampillai, T., & Looi, J. C. L. (2021). Sociocultural influences on interventions for anorexia nervosa. The Lancet Psychiatry, 8 (5), 362-363.

Allison, S., Warin, M ., Bastiampillai, T., Looi, J., & Strand, M. (2021). Recovery from anorexia nervosa: the influence of women’s sociocultural milieux. Australasian Psychiatry, 29 (5), 513-515.

Athanassiou, U., Whitten, T ., Tzoumakis, S., Hindmarsh, G., Laurens, K. R., Harris, F., . . . Dean, K. (2021). Examining the overlap of young people's early contact with the police as a person of interest and victim or witness. Journal of Criminology, 54 (4), 501-520.

Brewer, R ., Westlake, B., Hart, T., & Arauza, O. (2021). The Ethics of Web Crawling and Web Scraping in Criminological Research: Navigating Issues of Consent, Privacy and Other Potential Harms Associated with Automated Data Collection. In A. Lavorgna, & T. Holt (Eds.), Researching Cybercrimes . Palgrave.

Bright, D., Brewer, R ., & Morselli, C. (2021). Using social network analysis to study crime: Navigating the challenges of criminal justice records. Social Networks, 66 , 50-64.

Dean, K., Whitten, T ., Tzoumakis, S., Laurens, K. R., Harris, F., Carr, V. J., & Green, M. J. (2021). Incidence of early police contact among children with emerging mental health problems in Australia. JAMA Network Open, 4 (6), 1-13.

Foley, K., Warin, M ., Meyer, S., Miller, E., & Ward, P. (2021). Alcohol and flourishing for Australian women in midlife: a qualitative study of negotiating (un)happiness. Sociology, 55 (4), 1-17.

Green, M. J., Piotroswka, P. J., Tzoumakis, S., Whitten, T ., Laurens, K. R., Butler, M., . . . Carr, V. J. (2021). Profiles of resilience from early to middle childhood among children known to Child Protection services. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology , 1-13.

Green, M. J., Watkeys, O. J., Kariuki, M., Hindmarsh, G., Whitten, T ., Dean, K., ... & Carr, V. J. (2021). Forecasting childhood adversities from conditions of birth.  Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology .

Green, M. J., Watkeys, O. J., Whitten, T ., Thomas, C., Kariuki, M., Dean, K., . . . Carr, V. J. (2021). Increased incidence of childhood mental disorders following exposure to early life infection. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 97 , 376-382.

Hockin-Boyers, H., & Warin, M . (2021). Women, exercise and eating disorder recovery: The normal and the pathological. Qualitative Health Research, 31 (6), 1029-1042.

Holt, K. M., Holt, T. J., Cale, J., Brewer, R ., & Goldsmith, A. (2021). Assessing the role of self-control and technology access on adolescent sexting and sext dissemination. Computers in Human Behavior, 125 , 106952-1-106952-8.

Holt, T. J., Cale, J., Brewer, R ., & Goldsmith, A. (2021). Assessing the role of opportunity and low self-control in juvenile hacking. Crime and Delinquency, 67 (5), 662-688.

Laurens, K. R., Dean, K., Whitten, T ., Tzoumakis, S., Harris, F., Waddy, N., . . . Green, M. J. (2021). Early childhood predictors of elementary school suspension: An Australian record linkage study. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 77 , 11 pages.

Logos, K., Brewer, N., & Young, R. L. (2021). Countering biased judgments of individuals who display autism-characteristic behavior in forensic settings. Human Communication Research , 47 (3), 215-247.

Lunnay, B., Foley, K., Meyer, S. B., Warin, M ., Wilson, C., Olver, I., . . . Ward, P. R. (2021). Alcohol consumption and perceptions of health risks during COVID-19: a qualitative study of middle-aged women in South Australia. Frontiers in Public Health, 9 , 1-11.

Malvaso, C. G., Cale, J., Whitten, T ., Day, A., Singh, S., Hackett, L., . . . Ross, S. (2021). Associations between adverse childhood experiences and trauma among young people who offend: a systematic literature review. Trauma, Violence and Abuse: a Review Journal , 1-10.

Michell, D. (2021). Blood doesn't define evotypical families: Eleanor Spence's stories of informal and formal foster care in Australia. Bookbird: a journal of international children's literature, 59 (2), 27-39.

Morgan-Jones, E., Stefanovic, D ., & Loizides, N. (2021). Citizen endorsement of contested peace settlements: public opinion in post-Dayton Bosnia. Democratization , 28 (2), 432-452.

Nguyen, N., Zivkovic, T ., De Haas, R., & Faulkner, D. (2021). Problematizing "planning ahead": a cross-cultural analysis of Vietnamese health and community workers' perspectives on Advance Care Directives. Qualitative Health Research, 31 (12), 2304-2316.

Papadelos, P. (2021). “Greeks are different to Australians”: understanding identity formation among third-generation Australians of Greek heritage. Ethnic and Racial Studies , 44 (11), 1975-1994.

Papadelos, P ., Beasley, C., & Treagus, M. (2021). Social change and masculinities: exploring favourable spaces?. Journal of Sociology , 144078332110482.

Salter, M., & Whitten, T. (2021). A Comparative Content Analysis of Pre-Internet and Contemporary Child Sexual Abuse Material. Deviant Behavior , 15 pages.

Souza, M., Borgstrom, E., & Zivkovic, T . (2021). Rethinking end of life care: Attending to care, language and emotions. Social Science and Medicine, 291 , 114612.

Warin, M. (2021). No Appetite for Change: Culture, Liberalism and other Acts of Depoliticization in the Australian Obesity Debate. Sociological Research Online , 17 pages.

Warin, M. J ., & Moore, V. (2021). Epistemic conflicts and Achilles' heels: constraints of a university and public sector partnership to research obesity in Australia. Critical Public Health, 31 (5), 617-628.

Warin, M ., Keaney, J., Kowal, E., & Byrne, H. (2021). Circuits of time: enacting postgenomics in Indigenous Australia. Body and Society .

Whitten, T., Dean, K., Li, R., Laurens, K. R., Harris, F., Carr, V. J., & Green, M. J. (2021). Earlier contact with child protection services among children of parents with criminal convictions and mental disorders. Child Maltreatment, 26 (1), 63-73.

Zivkovic, T. M. (2021). About face: Relationalities of ageing and dying in Chinese migrant families. Social Science & Medicine , 291, 112827-1-112827-8.

Zivkovic, T. M. (2021). Lifelines and end-of-life decision-making: an anthropological analysis of advance care directives in cross-cultural contexts. Ethnos, 86 (4), 1-19.

Zizzo, G., Warin, M., Zivkovic, T ., & Maher, J. (2021). Productive exposures: Vulnerability as a parallel practice of care in ethnographic and community spaces. The Australian Journal of Anthropology, 32 (2), 150-165.

Brewer, R ., Fox, S., & Miller, C. (2020). Applying the techniques of neutralization to the study of cybercrime. In T. Holt, & A. Bossler (Eds.) The Palgrave handbook of international cybercrime and cyberdeviance (pp. 547-565). Palgrave.

Bright, D., & Brewer, R . (2020). Innovations in research on illicit networks. Global Crime , 21 (1), 1-2.

Holmes, M., Manning, N. , & Wettergren, A. (2020). Political economies of emotion. Emotions and Society, 2 (1), 3-11.

Loizides, N., & Stefanovic, D. (2020). Ethnic cleansing: Reversing the effects. In C. Ireland, M. Lewis, A. Lopez, & J. Ireland (Eds.) The Handbook of Collective Violence: Current Developments and Understanding (pp. 58-68). Routledge.

Manning, N. P., & Akhtar, P. (2020). 'No, we vote for whoever we want to': young British Muslims making new claims on citizenship amidst ongoing forms of marginalisation. Journal of Youth Studies, 24 (7), 16 pages.

McGee, T. R., Whitten, T ., Williams, C., Jolliffe, D., & Farrington, D. P. (2020). Classification of patterns of offending in developmental and life-course criminology, with special reference to persistence. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 59 , 1-9.

Michell, D. (2020). Recovering from Doing Research as a Survivor-Researcher.. Qualitative Report , 25 (5), 1377-1392.

Musolino, C., Warin, M ., & Gilchrist, P. (2020). Embodiment as a paradigm for understanding and treating SE-AN: Locating the self in culture. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 11 , 534-1-534-11.

Nutrire CoLab., Burnett, D., Carney, M. A., Carruth, L., Chard, S., Dickinson, M., . . . Yates-Doerr, E. (2020). Anthropologists Respond to The Lancet EAT Commission. Bionatura, 5 (1), 1023-1-1023-2.

Piotrowska, P. J., Whitten, T ., Tzoumakis, S., Laurens, K. R., Katz, I., Carr, V. J., . . . Green, M. J. (2020). Transitions between socio-emotional and cognitive vulnerability profiles from early to middle childhood: a population study using multi-agency administrative records. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: official journal of the European Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 29 (12), 1659-1670.

Suzuki, A., Stefanovic, D ., & Loizides, N. (2020). Displacement and the expectation of political violence: Evidence from Bosnia. Conflict Management and Peace Science , 38 (5), 19 pages.

Tzoumakis, S., Whitten, T. , Piotrowska, P. J., Dean, K., Laurens, K. R., Harris, F., . . . Green, M. J. (2020). Gender and the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior. Journal of Criminal Justice, 67 , 8 pages.

Warin, M. J. (2020). Beyond carrot sticks and sermons: The practice of education in obesity interventions. In D. Leahy, K. Fitzpatrick, & J. Wright (Eds.) Social Theory and Health Education: Forging New Insights in Research (pp. 230-240). Routledge.

Warin, M. J. (2020). The "gentle and invisible" violence of obesity prevention. American Anthropologist, 122 (3), 663-664.

Warin, M. J ., & Valdez, N. (2020). #My(white)BodyMyChoice. Thesis Eleven (Online Special: Living and Thinking Crisis).

Warin, M. J. , Kowal, E., & Meloni, M. (2020). Indigenous knowledge in a postgenomic landscape: The politics of epigenetic hope and reparation in Australia. Science, Technology, and Human Values, 45 (1), 87-111.

Wettergren, Å., Holmes, M., & Manning, N . (2020). Emotions in the pandemic: Crises and politics of change. Emotions and Society, 2 (2), 115-119.

Whitten, T ., Green, M. J., Tzoumakis, S., Laurens, K. R., Harris, F., Carr, V. J., & Dean, K. (2020). Children’s contact with police as a victim, person of interest and witness in New South Wales, Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 53 (3), 1-24.

Allen, Margaret. (2019) Controlling Transnational Asian Mobilities: A Comparison of Documentary Systems in Australia and South Africa (1890s to 1930s)' with Uma Dhupelia-Mesthrie in Robert Heynen and Emily van der Meulen, eds. Surveillance Societies: Transnational Histories (133-163). University of Toronto Press.

Brewer, R ., Vel-Palumbo, M. D., Hutchings, A., Holt, T., Goldsmith, A., & Maimon, D. (2019). Cybercrime prevention: theory and applications . Palgrave Macmillan.

Farrell, L., Moore, V., Warin, M ., & Street, J. (2019). Why do the public support or oppose obesity prevention regulations? Results from a South Australian population survey. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 (1), 47-59.

Holmes, M., Manning, N. P ., & Wettergren, A. (2019). Into the 21st Century. Emotions and Society, 1 (1), 3-8.

Holt, T. J., Brewer, R ., & Goldsmith, A. (2019). Digital drift and the “sense of injustice”: counter-productive policing of youth cybercrime. Deviant Behavior, 40 (9), 1144-1156.

Jurczyszyn, R., & Michell, D. (2019). We Can Do It and So Can Our Future Care Leavers! Care Leavers at University. In P. McNamara, C. Montserrat, & S. Wise (Eds.), Education in Out of Home Care (pp. 255-266). Springer Nature.

Michell, D. E. (2019). Oral Histories and Enlightened Witnessing. In K. Moruzi, N. Musgrove, & C. Pasco Leahy (Eds.), Children’s Voices from the Past New Historical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (pp. 211-231). Palgrave Macmillan.

Papadelos, P. (2019). Living between two cultures: reflecting on Greek orthodox mourning practices. Social Identities , 25 (2), 254-268.

Psaltis, C., Loizides, N., LaPierre, A., & Stefanovic, D. (2019). Transitional justice and acceptance of cohabitation in Cyprus. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 42 (11), 1850-1869.

Stefanovic, D ., & Evans, G. (2019). Multiple Winning Formulae? Far Right Voters and Parties in Eastern Europe. Europe-Asia Studies , 71 (9), 1443-1473.

Warin, M. (2019). The politics of disease: Obesity in historical perspective. Australian journal of general practice, 48 (10), 728-731.

Warin, M. J ., Jay, B., & Zivkovic, T. (2019). “Ready-made” assumptions: Situating convenience as care in the Australian obesity debate. Food and Foodways, 27 (4), 273-295.

Warin, M., & Zivkovic, T . (2019). Fatness, obesity and disadvantage in the Australian suburbs: unpalatable politics . Palgrave Macmillan.

Whitten, T. , Burton, M., Tzoumakis, S., & Dean, K. (2019). Parental Offending and Child Physical Health, Mental Health, and Drug Use Outcomes: A Systematic Literature Review. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 28 (5), 1155-1168.

Whitten, T., Green, M., Laurens, K., Tzoumakis, S., Harris, F., Carr, V., & Dean, K. (2019). Parental offending and children’s emergency department presentations in New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 27 (9), 832-838.

Whitten, T ., Laurens, K., Tzoumakis, S., Kaggodaarachchi, S., Green, M., Harris, F., . . . Dean, K. (2019). The influence of parental offending on the continuity and discontinuity of children’s internalizing and externalizing difficulties from early to middle childhood. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 54 (8), 965-975.

Whitten, T ., McGee, T. R., Homel, R., Farrington, D. P., & Ttofi, M. (2019). Comparing the criminal careers and childhood risk factors of persistent, chronic, and persistent–chronic offenders.  Australian & New Zealand journal of criminology ,  52 (2), 151-173.

Zivkovic, T. M. (2019). Preparing for (life after) death: Advance care directives and cyclic temporalities. Australian Journal of Anthropology, 30 (3), 264-276.

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  1. Best 11 Sociology PhD Programmes in Australia 2024

    Global, Urban and Social Studies. RMIT University. Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Ph.D. Arts. Deakin University. Geelong, Victoria, Australia. This page shows a selection of the available PhDs in Australia. If you're interested in studying a Sociology degree in Australia you can view all 11 PhDs.

  2. Doctor of Philosophy, Research School of Social Sciences

    Graduate students in the Research School of Social Sciences are located across seven school and centres: School of Sociology, School of Politics and International Relations, School of Philosophy, School of History, Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies, Australian Demographic and Social Research Centre, and Centre for Aboriginal Economic and ...

  3. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Social Sciences

    A PhD is a stepping stone to a career as a professional researcher in the public sector, think tanks, charities, universities, and private corporations. Individuals with PhDs in social sciences are highly sought after for various professions in public and private organisations and have found roles in writing, the law, public service, consulting ...

  4. School of Sociology

    Welcome to the School of Sociology. The discipline of Sociology is one of the academic pillars on which The Australian National University was built. The defining characteristic of sociology at ANU since the discipline was first institutionalised in the 1960s has been constructive engagement with the big issues facing Australian and global ...

  5. Doctor of Philosophy (Arts and Social Sciences)

    Completion requirement To satisfy requirements of the PhD degree candidates must: complete a probationary year and produce an extended thesis proposal or thesis chapter (10,000 to 12,000 words, or equivalent in a practice-led PhD) at the end of their first year of full-time candidature (or the part-time equivalent) and other required milestones; and,

  6. PhD (Global, Urban & Social Studies)

    Overview. The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in the humanities and social sciences cultivates high-level skills in research processes, advanced communication skills, analysis and synthesis of knowledge. You'll develop and extend your expertise, widen your networks, enhance your career prospects and produce socially useful research.

  7. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    As a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) candidate, you'll complete a substantial program of independent and original research in your chosen field of study. A PhD prepares you for a range of careers - from academic to industry and is the highest degree qualification available. ... Sydney NSW 2052 Australia Telephone: +61 2 93851000. UNSW CRICOS ...

  8. Publishing during a sociology PhD in Australia: Differences by elite

    Third, this study did not compare sociology with other disciplines. It might be that the practice of publishing during a sociology PhD study is less embedded in Australia and has yet to translate into a Go8 advantage. This broad similarity may not apply in science disciplines where doctoral publishing is more common (Lee & Kamler, 2008).

  9. What's it like to study a PhD in sociology?

    Emma: For the PhD, it's a lot more independent and you get to have a lot of control over what you want to explore. Something else that's nice is you get to have that relationship with your supervisory team, and it's nice because you have the support around you to explore what you're really interested in.

  10. Sociology PhD Projects, Programmes & Scholarships in Australia

    Deakin University. A PhD scholarship is available to work on an Australian Research Council-funded project exploring youth 'side-hustles'. Read more. Funded PhD Programme (Students Worldwide) Social Sciences Research Programme. More Details.

  11. Sociology

    Sociology is the study of contemporary societies in a global context. We investigate diverse human groups, communities, institutions, organisations, and social phenomena. Our undergraduate units provide students with the opportunity to explore theoretical and methodological issues, and cover topics such as health, families, sustainability ...

  12. Sociology

    Sociology is the systematic study of all aspects of our lives and the discipline that matters for understanding and improving our social world. Sociology at University of Melbourne has a strong analytical, empirical and evidence-based focus that engages with real-world problems and is reflected in our teaching, research and engagement ...

  13. School of Social and Political Sciences

    The School of Social and Political Sciences is a leading centre of excellence, uniting disciplines such as Criminology, Sociology, Political Economy, Government and International Relations and Anthropology. Our diverse range of single, undergraduate, joint and post graduate programmes are ranked highly both nationally and internationally.

  14. The Monash Doctoral Program

    The Monash Doctoral Program enhances your research project with advanced training that equips you with the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to: Make an impact in academia, industry, government or community after graduation. It is a PhD designed to prepare graduates with the skills and capabilities sought by employers, giving you a ...

  15. School of Social Science

    Sociology is offered as: a minor, or single or extended major in the Bachelor of Arts. a minor, or a single major in the Diploma in Arts. a sequence of elective courses in the Bachelor of Social Science. an elective as part of other degrees offered by UQ.

  16. Sociology of education

    UNSW School of Education has a strong research program exploring the sociology of education. The Systems, Structures and Social Justice Research Community studies the role of education, broadly construed, in the creation, maintenance and/or disruption of social difference and inequality. With a view of education through the prism of sociology ...

  17. Anthropology

    The Discipline seeks to represent the breadth and diversity of contemporary social and cultural anthropology today. We have long focused our research and teaching on the regions of Oceania, Indigenous Australia, South-East Asia, and Latin America. We are continuously deepening and expanding our ethnographic and theoretical inquiries within and ...

  18. PDF The publishing practices of Australian sociology PhD students

    University of Western Australia & La Trobe University In this article, we investigated the publishing practices of Australian sociology PhD students during enrolment. It examines a five-year ... sociology PhD (n=305) 2013-17, 156 students achieved 361 articles in 279 journals. Overall, 186 journals out of these 279

  19. Department of Sociology, Criminology & Gender Studies

    Sociology of Health and Illness: a journal of medical sociology. Warin, M. (2022). Flexible Kinship. Medical Anthropology Quarterly: international journal for the cultural and social analysis of health. ... Youth Citizenship and Housing Responses to Homelessness in South Australia: PhD:

  20. Sociology

    Sociology is the study of human behaviour, beliefs and identity in the context of social interaction, social relationships, institutions and change. Learn how society shapes us, how we shape society, how the 'modern' world came about, and how it might develop in the future. When you study sociology you will be introduced through our first year ...

  21. Publishing during a sociology PhD in Australia: Differences by elite

    We examined the latest decade of Australian sociology PhD completions for differences in the number and quality of research outputs students published during doctoral enrolment. There was no evidence of a statistically significant difference between Go8 PhD students and their non-Go8 PhD counterparts in terms of either the quantity of research publications achieved, or the quality of these ...