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theses

This guide provides information on searching for theses of Cambridge PhDs and for theses of UK universities and universities abroad. 

For information and guidance on depositing your thesis as a cambridge phd, visit the cambridge office of scholarly communication pages on theses here ., this guide gives essential information on how to obtain theses using the british library's ethos service. .

On the last weekend of October, the British Library became the victim of a major cyber-attack. Essential digital services including the BL catalogue, website and online learning resources went dark, with research services like the EThOS collection of more than 600,000 doctoral theses suddenly unavailable. The BL state that they anticipate restoring more services in the next few weeks, but disruption to certain services is now expected to persist for several months. For the latest news on the attack and information on the restoration of services, please follow the BL blog here:  Knowledge Matters blog  and access the LibGuide page here:  British Library Outage Update - Electronic Legal Deposit - LibGuides at University of Cambridge Subject Libraries

A full list of resources for searching theses online is provided by the Cambridge A-Z, available here .

University of Cambridge theses

Finding a cambridge phd thesis online via the institutional repository.

The University's institutional repository, Apollo , holds full-text digital versions of over 11,000 Cambridge PhD theses and is a rapidly growing collection deposited by Cambridge Ph.D. graduates. Theses in Apollo can be browsed via this link . More information on how to access theses by University of Cambridge students can be found on the access to Cambridge theses webpage.   The requirement for impending PhD graduates to deposit a digital version in order to graduate means the repository will be increasing at a rate of approximately 1,000 per year from this source.   About 200 theses are added annually through requests to make theses Open Access or via requests to digitize a thesis in printed format.

Locating and obtaining a copy of a Cambridge PhD thesis (not yet available via the repository)

Theses can be searched in iDiscover .  Guidance on searching for theses in iDiscover can be found here .   Requests for consultation of printed theses, not available online, should be made at the Manuscripts Reading Room (Email:  [email protected] Telephone: +44 (0)1223 333143).   Further information on the University Library's theses, dissertations and prize essays collections can be consulted at this link .

Researchers can order a copy of an unpublished thesis which was deposited in print form either through the Library’s  Digital Content Unit via the image request form , or, if the thesis has been digitised, it may be available in the Apollo repository. Copies of theses may be provided to researchers in accordance with the  law  and in a manner that is common across UK libraries.  The law allows us to provide whole copies of unpublished theses to individuals as long as they sign a declaration saying that it is for non-commercial research or private study.

How to make your thesis available online through Cambridge's institutional repository

Are you a Cambridge alumni and wish to make your Ph.D. thesis available online? You can do this by depositing it in Apollo the University's institutional repository. Click here for further information on how to proceed.    Current Ph.D students at the University of Cambridge can find further information about the requirements to deposit theses on the Office of Scholarly Communication theses webpages.

print thesis cambridge

UK Theses and Dissertations

Electronic copies of Ph.D. theses submitted at over 100 UK universities are obtainable from EThOS , a service set up to provide access to all theses from participating institutions. It achieves this by harvesting e-theses from Institutional Repositories and by digitising print theses as they are ordered by researchers using the system. Over 250,000 theses are already available in this way. Please note that it does not supply theses submitted at the universities of Cambridge or Oxford although they are listed on EThOS.

Registration with EThOS is not required to search for a thesis but is necessary to download or order one unless it is stored in the university repository rather than the British Library (in which case a link to the repository will be displayed). Many theses are available without charge on an Open Access basis but in all other cases, if you are requesting a thesis that has not yet been digitised you will be asked to meet the cost. Once a thesis has been digitised it is available for free download thereafter.

When you order a thesis it will either be immediately available for download or writing to hard copy or it will need to be digitised. If you order a thesis for digitisation, the system will manage the process and you will be informed when the thesis is available for download/preparation to hard copy.

print thesis cambridge

See the Search results section of the  help page for full information on interpreting search results in EThOS.

EThOS is managed by the British Library and can be found at http://ethos.bl.uk . For more information see About EThOS .

World-wide (incl. UK) theses and dissertations

Electronic versions of non-UK theses may be available from the institution at which they were submitted, sometimes on an open access basis from the institutional repository. A good starting point for discovering freely available electronic theses and dissertations beyond the UK is the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD) , which facilitates searching across institutions. Information can also usually be found on the library web pages of the relevant institution.

The DART Europe etheses portal lists several thousand full-text theses from a group of European universities.

The University Library subscribes to the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses  (PQDT) database which from August 31 2023 is accessed on the Web of Science platform.  To search this index select it from the Web of Science "Search in" drop-down list of databases (available on the Documents tab on WoS home page)

PQDT includes 2.4 million dissertation and theses citations, representing 700 leading academic institutions worldwide from 1861 to the present day. The database offers full text for most of the dissertations added since 1997 and strong retrospective full text coverage for older graduate works. Each dissertation published since July 1980 includes a 350-word abstract written by the author. Master's theses published since 1988 include 150-word abstracts.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The University Library only subscribes to the abstracting & indexing version of the ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database and NOT the full text version.  A fee is payable for ordering a dissertation from this source.   To obtain the full text of a dissertation as a downloadable PDF you can submit your request via the University Library Inter-Library Loans department (see contact details below). NB this service is only available to full and current members of the University of Cambridge.

Alternatively you can pay yourself for the dissertation PDF on the PQDT platform. Link from Web of Science record display of any thesis to PQDT by clicking on "View Details on ProQuest".  On the "Preview" page you will see an option "Order a copy" top right.  This will allow you to order your own copy from ProQuest directly.

Dissertations and theses submitted at non-UK universities may also be requested on Inter-Library Loan through the Inter-Library Loans department (01223 333039 or 333080, [email protected] )

  • Last Updated: Dec 20, 2023 9:47 AM
  • URL: https://libguides.cam.ac.uk/theses

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How do I find a Cambridge thesis?

Ph.D., M.Litt., M.Sc., and Divinity M.Phil. theses approved after 1970 are catalogued in iDiscover, as are M.D. and M.Chir. theses approved after May 2006. Earlier theses are listed in a card catalogue in the Manuscripts Reading Room and are gradually being added to iDiscover.

Since 1 October 2017, all PhD theses are being deposited in electronic form to the University repository  Apollo . Many earlier theses are also in the repository, but if they are not yet in digital form it is possible to request access to these theses. There is more information on how to request a copy of a printed thesis further down this page.

Gaining access to electronic copies of a thesis

The author of a given thesis in Apollo can choose whether their thesis is available to be downloaded, available on request or unavailable. While many of the theses in Apollo are openly available for download, some theses in the repository are not open access because they have either been embargoed by the author or because they are unable to be made openly available for copyright or other reasons.

Requesting a copy of a printed thesis

Researchers can order a copy of an unpublished thesis which was deposited in print form through the Library’s  Digital Content Unit  via the  image request form . Copies of theses may be provided to researchers in accordance with the  law  and in a manner that is common across UK libraries.The law allows us to provide whole copies of unpublished theses to individuals as long as they sign a declaration saying that it is for non-commercial research or private study. The agreement used for access to theses at Cambridge has been drafted using the guidance by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

Theses are not available for borrowing or inter library loan. The copyright of theses remains with the author. The law does not allow us to provide a copy for inclusion in a general library collection or for wider distribution beyond the individual receiving the copy, without the explicit permission of the author or copyright holder. Where someone approaches us asking for a copy for their library or wider distribution, they must obtain the explicit permission of the author or copyright owner.

Please note any periods of access restriction requested by the author apply to both electronic and print copies.

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This project is a joint initiative of Cambridge University Library and the Research Strategy Office .

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Q. How do I access a dissertation from the University of Cambridge?

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Answered By: Jenni Lecky-Thompson Last Updated: Mar 22, 2023     Views: 11053

Finding print dissertations

The University Library holds all Cambridge dissertations from 1921 onwards and they can be ordered from the Manuscript Reading Room (01223 333143, [email protected] ). They can't be borrowed or supplied for inter-library loan.

Information on finding theses and dissertations can be found on the Theses Libguide .   Details of all Cambridge theses approved since 1970 can be found using iDiscover . They are also listed in the EThOS database.

Copying of Cambridge dissertations is subject to regulations made by the Board of Graduate Studies. Personal applications for the purchase of copies of dissertations for private research can be directed to the Digital Content Unit ( http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/departments/digital-content-unit ; email [email protected] ). There is a charge for this. To purchase dissertations on behalf of an institution (e.g. for library stock) the author's permission is required before a copy can be supplied.

Finding digitised dissertations

Apollo , the University's institutional repository, holds full-text digital versions of several hundred Cambridge PhD. theses. This is a rapidly growing collection deposited on a voluntary basis.

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PhD thesis formatting

There is no official pre-made departmental or University-wide style template for PhD theses. Some argue that learning (and advancing!) the art of beautifully typesetting a thesis is a crucial part of getting a PhD.

Here are some practical recommendations, examples, and useful starting points.

Most PhD authors in the Computer Laboratory prefer LaTeX as their typesetting system (under both Linux or Windows), mainly because of its

  • excellent and yet unmatched support for mathematical formulae;
  • good support for managing bibliographic references;
  • good support for high-quality typography;
  • easy integration with software-engineering tools (make, revision control, etc.);
  • very safe and robust handling of large documents;
  • long-term stability;
  • comprehensive free tool support.

A common approach is to use the report style, with a suitable title page added, margins changed to make good use of the A4 format, and various other changes to suit submission requirements and individual tastes (e.g., other fonts).

For preparing publication-quality diagrams, some of the most powerful and popular tools used include:

  • PGF/TikZ – the probably most sophisticated drawing package for LaTeX
  • matplotlib – Matlab-style function plotting in Python

Official requirements

There used to be detailed Student Registry PhD format requirements , regarding font sizes and line spacing, but most Degree Committees have dropped these, recognizing that they were mainly motivated by past typewriter conventions. The rules left are now mainly about the word count .

In particular, it is no longer necessary for dissertations to be printed single sided or in “one-and-a-half spaced type”. If you still like to increase the line spacing, for easier proofreading, you can achieve this in LaTeX by placing into the preamble the line “ \usepackage{setspace}\onehalfspacing ”.

Recommendations

One Cambridge thesis-binding company, J.S. Wilson & Son , recommend on their web page to leave 30 mm margin on the spine and 20 mm on the other three sides of the A4 pages sent to them. About a centimetre of the left margin is lost when the binder stitches the pages together.

Write your thesis title and section headings in “sentence case”, that is use the same capitalization that you would have used in normal sentences (capitalize only the first word, proper nouns and abbreviations). Avoid the US-style “title case” that some conference-proceedings publishers require.

  • Sentence case is normal typographic practice in the UK (see any UK-published newspaper, magazine, journals such as Nature , etc.).
  • The catalogues of both the University Library thesis collection and our departmental Technical Report series record titles this way, and you don't want the cataloguers mess with your title capitalization when your thesis finally reaches them.
  • It preserves useful information about the correct capitalization of any names or technical terms used.

Page numbers

Use a single page-number sequence for all pages in your thesis, i.e. do not use a separate sequence of Roman numerals for front-matter (title page, abstract, acknowledgements, table of contents, table of figure). In LaTeX that means using the report style, not the book style.

  • PDF viewers number pages continuously starting from 1, and using anything else as printed page numbers causes confusion.
  • This will save you some reformatting when submitting your thesis as a techreport .

Bibliographic references

If you use purely-numeric bibliographic references, do not forget to still mention authors’ surnames, as a courtesy to both the authors and your readers. Also, try to add the exact page number on which the quoted point is found in the reference; LaTeX supports this really well. (“suggested by Crowcroft and Kuhn [42,p107]”)

Technical Report submission

After a thesis has been approved by the examiners, the author normally submits it for publication as a Computer Laboratory Technical Report .

It is a good idea to read early on the submission guidelines for technical reports , as this may reduce the need to change the formatting later.

If you want to minimize any changes needed between your submitted thesis and the corresponding technical report version, then – in addition to applying all the above advice – you can

  • make page 1 the title page,
  • make page 2 the required declaration of originality,
  • make page 3 the summary, and
  • choose a layout suitable for double-sided printing (required for techreport, since 2010 also allowed for final PhD submission).

This way, there is a very high chance that turning your thesis into a techreport could be as simple as replacing pages 1 and 2 with the standard Technical Report title page (which the techreport editor can do for you).

More information

  • The Computer Laboratory house style page explains where to find the University identifier that many put on the title page of their thesis.
  • Markus Kuhn’s simple PhD thesis template ( snapshot ) is just one possible starting point.
  • The cam-thesis LaTeX class is a collaborative effort to maintain a Cambridge PhD thesis template for Computer Laboratory research students, initiated by Jean Martina, Rok Strniša, and Matej Urbas.
  • Effective scientific electronic publishing – Markus Kuhn’s notes on putting scientific publications onto the web, especially for LaTeX/LNCS users.
  • International Standard ISO 7144 Presentation of theses and similar documents (1986) contains also some general guidelines for formatting dissertations that may be of use.
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The doctoral thesis should contain material of sufficient originality to merit publication. The original material should be adequate to form a substantial basis of a monograph or at least two journal articles. The thesis should demonstrate the candidate's command of the relevant literature.

The thesis should be a coherent piece of work, rather than several disparate pieces of research juxtaposed together. It may include published work, provided it is part of a connected argument and it is in the same format as the rest of the thesis. The thesis may also include appendices which are relevant to the material contained in the thesis but do not form part of the connected argument (e.g. primary source materials that are not readily accessible, questionnaire responses, statistical tables, descriptions of objects or analytical bibliographies).

It is important that you indicate clearly the sources from which you have obtained your information and the extent to which you have made use of the work of others. You are required to include a declaration that it is entirely your own work and that it is not substantially the same as any work you have submitted for another qualification. You should also include a declaration of the length of your thesis, which should be no more than 80,000 words, including footnotes but excluding the bibliography. There are no set expectations for the minimum length. If you need an extension to the word limit, or wish to submit an appendix that does not count towards the word limit, you will need to apply to the Degree Committee for permission, using the form available on CamSIS.

You should write the thesis in English. Quotations from other languages should usually be given in translation with the original text, where appropriate, given in a footnote or appendix.

The thesis should be in typescript on one side only of A4 paper in portrait format. The text should be adequately spaced, with a font size no smaller than 11 point for the main text and 10 point for footnotes. You must include a title page giving your full name, your College, the full title of the thesis and the degree for which it is submitted. A one-page abstract should also be included.

Please note that the form in which your thesis is presented, and the care with which it has been prepared and illustrated, are in themselves evidence of your capabilities and will receive consideration as such. You are strongly advised to check carefully for typing errors, spelling mistakes and poor use of English. Correcting such errors may be a condition of approval for the degree.

In planning your thesis you should take account of the criteria for recommending award of the PhD set out in the Guide to Examiners:

  • The thesis is a significant contribution to the field of study through the creation and interpretation of new knowledge, connection of previously unrelated facts or the development of new theory or revision of older views.
  • The work is of a quality in whole or in part of a standard to merit publication (whether or not subsequently published).
  • The thesis provides evidence of the acquisition of knowledge and a detailed understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry.
  • It is of a quality and quantity to reflect three years of full-time postgraduate study or five years of part-time study.

Collaborative research

Inclusion in the thesis of work carried out in collaboration is unusual and requires the approval of the Degree Committee and Student Registry. If you have been given leave to work in collaboration with others you should indicate clearly which parts of your thesis relate to this work and should state the names of those with whom you have collaborated and the extent to which they have assisted you.

Human participants

If you are planning to collect data from human participants, or use data collected from human participants, you will need to plan well in advance to ensure that you have obtained ethical approval before starting work on your project and have given consideration to how you are going to handle the information you collect.

Working with human participants: ethical approval and data protection

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Before submitting

The word limit is 15,000 words, exclusive of footnotes, bibliography and appendices. The Degree Committee cannot give permission to exceed the word limit.

Format and presentation

Please see the information on the  Cambridge Students  website.

Submission deadlines

Students starting in October – 31 August (2pm) Students starting in January – 30 November (2pm)

If these dates fall on a Saturday, Sunday or public holiday, we will accept the thesis by 12 noon on the next working day.

Extensions can only be granted in limited circumstances; see  Extending your submission date . If you do not submit by your deadline, you will be removed from the register of graduate students, which will result in you losing access to resources. However, if this happens, you will still be able to submit your thesis  at a later date .

If you are planning to leave the country at the end of your course, or if you are intending to commence a PhD shortly after completing your MPhil, you may need to be examined early and should aim to submit your thesis well in advance of the last possible date.

Preparing to submit

Four weeks before you intend to submit your thesis, please complete the online  Intention to Submit Form . After consulting with your supervisor, the GSO will arrange for your examiners to be appointed and your title approved. The GSO will also add you to the Moodle site so that you will be able to submit your thesis when it is completed.

Where and what to submit

Details of what you must include can be found on the Cambridge Students website. 

You should submit an electronic pdf copy of your thesis via the Engineering Degree Committee thesis submission   Moodle site. Please name the file "MPhil_Your CRSid.pdf" so that it is identifiable.

The MPhil in Engineering is examined by dissertation only. You will be required to take two modules and take part in a Researcher Development Course but the results do not count towards your final degree.

After submitting

The oral examination (viva).

We will email you when your thesis has been forwarded to your examiners. You should expect to wait at least 6 weeks for your oral examination. In most cases the viva will be between you and two examiners, usually one internal and one external. The examiners of your thesis will want to satisfy themselves that  it is clearly written, that it takes account of previously published work on the subject and that it represents a contribution to learning .  The regulations for the MPhil in Engineering also require that the thesis  provides evidence that you can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject.

If you wish to notify examiners of any disability or request adjustments on account of such disability for your viva voce examination (either for your first year assessment or final examination), you can do this via your Degree Committee by completing and submitting the  voluntary disclosure form .

After your oral examination, you may be asked to make some corrections to your thesis. If your examiners do not provide you with a list of corrections, please contact the  GSO  and we will arrange for a list to be sent to you.  When the corrections are complete, you should show them to your internal examiner (and/or your external examiner in some cases).

After the examination

Your examiners' reports will be considered at a meeting of the  Engineering Degree Committee . Following this meeting, you will receive an email from the Graduate Studies Office informing you of the outcome, along with copies of your examiners' reports.

No corrections needed, or corrections completed and approved before paperwork considered by Degree Committee

If you were not required to make any corrections, or you have already completed your corrections and they have been approved by your examiners before your paperwork is considered by the Degree Committee, then you will receive an email from the GSO informing you that you have passed.

Corrections required

Examiners can recommend that you need to complete some corrections to your thesis. These can be either minor, which you will be given three weeks to complete, or major, which you will be given six weeks to complete. These timings start from the date that your examination paperwork is approved by the Degree Committee, and you will receive an email from the GSO informing you of the relevant timeframes following that meeting.

You remain on the register of graduate students during this period (unless your corrections are approved sooner), however the working restrictions for graduate students do not apply during this time. You should still apply for  leave to work away  if you are completing your corrections away from Cambridge. After completing your corrections, you should send them to your internal examiner to approve, who will then confirm to the Degree Committee, via the GSO, when they have done so. Approval of corrections does not need to go through any further committee meetings. The GSO will then notify you when your degree is approved.

Other outcomes

Although the most common outcome is that corrections are required before you can be awarded an MPhil (or occasionally an outright pass), it is also possible that you may be asked to  Revise and Resubmit  your thesis for a new examination. In rare cases, outright failure is a possible outcome. You can find the full list of potential outcomes in the  Code of Practice .

After degree approval

After your MPhil, including any corrections required, has been approved by the Degree Committee, you will be notified by the Graduate Studies Office, by email, within a few days of the Degree Committee meeting. You can then  make arrangements  to attend a congregation, or have your degree awarded  in absentia .

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Submitting your thesis

Instructions and guidelines for submitting your ph.d. thesis.

  • Thesis typography
  • Before submitting, please read the helpful advice from the Student Registry on  Research Best Practice .
  • Appointment of Examiners and Intention to Submit Your supervisor will need to arrange for the appointment of examiners at least two months before you submit. Please let your supervisor and the Secretary of the Degree Committee know your expected date of submission and the title of your thesis. There is a form which your supervisor should use. Examiners are appointed by the Degree Committee upon the recommendation of the supervisor.
  • Submitting your thesis to the Degree Committee   Please follow the instructions to upload your thesis via the department's filer, and send a copy of your abstract and declaration to the Secretary of the Degree Committee (degree-committee-secretary at cst.cam.ac.uk). The  upload page   allows you to deposit a source-code package that you can leave with the department, for example to archive any software that you wrote in association with your thesis, and an editable source version of the thesis document. These will be deposited on the departmental filer at /anfs/www-uploads/phd = \\filer\www-uploads\phd.
  • Viva voce examinations by video conference and adjustments If you require any special arrangements for the viva voce examination, the Degree Committee will need to know well in advance. Many viva voce examinations for the Ph.D. Degree are being conducted by video conference and there is no requirement to have a trusted person with you during the examination. It is hoped that the department might return to in-person vivas soon but please let the Secretary know if you will need your examination to be held via video conference.
  • Impact of Coronavirus   The University is aware that during the COVID-related lockdowns student experienced some difficulties. You are invited, therefore, to also submit an impact statement to the Secretary of the Degree Committee along with the declaration and abstract. See Guidance for students for further details. The form may be downloaded from here .
  • The Internal Examiner will arrange the date and time of your examination, a 'viva' . This should take place within around ninety days of submission.
  • After you have defended your thesis in the viva, the Examiners' recommendations go to the next meeting of the Degree Committee for approval subject to any corrections recommended by the Examiners.
  • Degree Committee papers and the Examiners' reports and the outcome of the examination then go to the Student Registry's Records and Examination Office. The Student Registry will send you copies of the reports and instructions about submitting corrections, the hard-bound UL thesis copy, and the Apollo Repository version.
  • Once all corrections have been made and approved by the Examiners, and notification has been sent to the Student Registry, the hard-bound University Library copy of your thesis, summary and declaration form, may be submitted to the Student Registry at the New Museums Site. See the submission information and Student Union's binding services information.
  • You should also replace your uploaded electronic version of the thesis on the Lab's filer with the corrected version AND also submit an electronic copy via the Apollo repository .
  • Once the conditions of the approval of the Ph.D. Degree have been met, including submission of the hard-bound thesis, you will receive a letter informing you that you may arrange with your College Praelector to graduate at the next appropriate Congregation. You will remain on the Register of Postgraduate Students until you receive your degree certificate at the Congregation.
  • The Department of Computer Science and Technology will expect you to submit your thesis as a Technical Report . Once you have done this, the electronic version of your thesis is removed from the filer.

If you have any questions not covered above, please consult the Secretary of the Degree Committee.

Secretary of the Degree Committee, October 2017, updated June 2023

Department of Computer Science and Technology University of Cambridge William Gates Building 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD

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Printed theses held in Cambridge

Copies of all postgraduate theses written by students at the University of Cambridge must be deposited in Cambridge University Library. Their online Theses catalogue contains records of theses approved from 1970 onwards. For pre-1970 theses there is a card catalogue in the Manuscripts Reading Room. See the Manuscripts Department's web page on Theses for further information.

Electronic Cambridge theses

From 1 October 2017 all PhD students are required to deposit both a hard copy and an electronic copy of their thesis to the University Library. Find out more on how to access Cambridge electronic theses and how to deposit yours if you are a Cambridge PhD student, on the Office of Scholarly Comunications' Theses website.

UK theses, electronic and in print

You may need to consult a thesis published by another university in the UK. For information on how to access these via the University Library, see their Inter-Library Loans website.

The British Library also has a new Electronic Theses Online Service (EThOS) .

International theses, electronic and in print

Try some of the "Related links" on the right hand side of this page to locate national and international theses, either in digital or print format. Many universities around the world now require their Ph.D. or Masters students to provide their theses in electronic format, and to deposit them on their institutional repositories so that they can subsequently be downloaded by everyone for free. Try finding the website for the university that published the thesis that you are interested in and then search for "theses" or "Electronic Theses and Dissertations" or "ETDs" - or try a Google search using the same search terms and the name of the university.

ProQuest Dissertations and Theses A&I is a comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses from around the world, dating back to 1743. Access for members of the University of Cambridge is to the abstracts only but it is a good source for finding out the bibliographic details of theses. 

Useful links

  • Centre for Research Libraries, CRL
  • DART-Europe
  • dissertations.se (Swedish theses)
  • DiVA (Scandinavian theses)
  • EThOS (UK e-theses)
  • Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD)
  • OpenDOAR (Directory of Open Access Repositories)
  • ROAR (Registry of Open Access Repositories)
  • Trove (Australian theses)
  • University of Cambridge theses on the institutional repository, Apollo
  • PQDT (ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Abstracting & Indexing Service)

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You can access undergraduate and graduate student dissertations in Anthropology and Archaeology via the Haddon Library. You must be a current member of the University to access student dissertations. When you find a dissertation that you'd like to read, please request it by emailing us or asking at the front desk.

  • List of Archaeology/BioAnth (undergraduate) dissertations available to view online,  2020-Present (Google Sheet)   
  • List of Social Anthropology (undergraduate) dissertations available to view online,  2020-Present (Google Sheet) 

Please note that as of April 2024 , all requests for online access to dissertations will be granted for seven calendar days , so use your reading time wisely. If you require access past this time, you will need to submit a new request.

Print dissertations are for use in the library only and cannot be borrowed.

  • List of Social Anthropology/Archaeology/BioAnth (undergraduate/graduate) dissertations in print , up to 2019 (Excel)   

Recently completed Cambridge PhD theses are available via Apollo , the University Repository (unless under embargo). 

You can also search for the full text of PhD theses across the UK using the British Library's EThOS service  or browse the Proquest Dissertations and Theses database for research across 700 academic institutions worldwide.

You can request theses from other institutions via the University Library's Inter-Library Loan service .

Related Links

  • Cambridge PhD Theses on Apollo
  • British Library EThOS service

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print thesis cambridge

The Manuscripts Reading Room administers the University's collection of doctoral and higher degree theses. Before 1920, degrees were awarded on the basis of examinations or certificates of research, and little written work composed specifically for such purposes survives, other than a small collection of Advanced Student Dissertations. Revised regulations were approved, instituting the new degree of PhD, which required a written work to be deposited in the University Library. Our collection of doctoral theses thus dates from 1921, when just four arrived in the Library. Statistics illustrate a great increase in output: for the academic year 2015-2016 just over one thousand new dissertations were approved and added to our collection. There are now over 39,000 volumes.

Contact: Manuscripts Reading Room (01223 333143, [email protected] )

Cambridge theses held by CUL

A small but growing proportion of Cambridge theses are available to consult in digital form in the university repository Apollo .

See the Office of Scholarly Communication's webpages on theses .

Cambridge University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR, UK

Email:  [email protected]

Tel: +44 (0) 1223 333000

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The SU Print Shop offers cheap self-service printing, binding, copying and scanning within the University of Cambridge.

In this section

  • Thesis Binding

Our professional printers offer double sided printing and have an output of up to 60 pages per minute. All of our paper stocks are fully recyclable and are sourced from managed forests to meet ISO 14001 environmental credentials. 

Softbinding

Soft-comb binding is available for documents up to 450 pages and is guaranteed to be to  University standards .  Please note: We are unable to bind work that has been printed elsewhere, you must purchase printing along with your binding order.

Prices start from £3.60

You can order binding and printing here  Printing and Binding (cambridgesu.co.uk)

(All prices quoted include front and back covers, as well as the plastic binding comb)

Hardbinding

print thesis cambridge

We work in partnership with J S Wilson & Son Bookbinders to offer a five working day thesis hardbinding service in line with University standards . Binding is available in a selection of colours (a swatch book is available from SU reception on request) and a variety of finishing options. Prices vary from £46.99 for cloth binding with spine lettering to £57.98 for spine and front cover lettering with foil engraved crest. Head and Tail bands are also available for an additional charge.

A hardbinding order form should be completed with your printing outlining your binding preferences, cover material and text. Simply drop off your thesis or print at Cambridge SU Reception by 3 pm on Thursday and it will be ready for collection from the SU Lounge the following Friday. Please note that the Cambridge SU, Reception & Services will be closed on Friday, the 29th of March & Monday, the 1st of April. We will reopen at 9:30 am on Tuesday, the 2nd of April.

Payments for hardbinding can be made on the website.

Here is the form to be completed for you to download , or you can complete one when you arrive.

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You can print, copy and scan using the University's Managed Print service. It is available in College and Department computer rooms that use the University Managed Desktop (UMD) service. It is also available for use on your own device, either on or away from the University network, but you will need to install the appropriate software first.

You pay for printing through credits on either your Common Balance or Local Balance. Many Colleges and Departments use the University-wide Common Balance, while some operate their own Local Balance scheme, which may include some free credits. 

If you need high-volume reprographics, contact our Printroom .

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Windows and macos.

Use  Print Deploy  using credits on your Local Balance or Common Balance when connected to the University network. 

You will typically only have credits on your Local Balance, so you should use  Print Deploy  when connected to the University network.

You can use Web Print to print to DS-Print multi-function devices (MFDs) using just a web browser. You do not need to install any additional software. Web Print can be used by both staff and students with credit on either their Local or Common Balance.

Common Balance credits

You can view and buy Common Balance credit using a credit or debit card on the  Managed Print Portal  (you must be connected to the University Data Network, or on the  VPN ). You can also view your transaction and print job history, print and copying rates, and your environmental impact.

You can also use cash at some participating Colleges and Departments to buy credit. The minimum top-up is £1, which buys about 20 black and white A4 sheets of printing or copying. 

Local Balance credits

You can check your Local Balance credits using the Managed Print Portal  (you must be connected to the University Data Network, or on the  VPN ). Speak to your local IT staff about topping up your Local Balance credit.

Where you can print

You print in both Colleges and Departments. You can find the charge rates for printing by logging into the Managed Print Portal , and then selecting Rates from the left-hand menu. Using the search box at the top of the page you can find your institution and printer .

Local Balance:

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  • Murray Edwards

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[email protected]               +44 (0)1223 242000

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Thesis & Dissertation 

Step 1 - upload.

Click HERE to upload your files and let us know your requirements. For example; How many copies, would you like it printed colour or black and white, single sided?, etc

Step 2 - Get a quote

We will check your files and your requirements and email you with a quote and give you instructions for payment.

Step 3 - We print!

After payment has been made we will print it and we can soft bind or take it to  J.S Wilson Bookbinders for hard bind. Then you just collect when ready!

Open Book

How do I set my files for print?

Please make sure that you have set your default page size to A4. We receive many files set to American 'Letter' size and although we can print from this it will mean you have more white space at the top and bottom of each printed page than you expect.

In which format should I send my files?

Ideally we would like all files converted to PDF format but we accept Word and Publisher. Please contact us if your file is in a different format. Please check it throughly before sending this will  allow us to print your files quicker and give you a  peace  of mind.

What are the margins required for binding?

The binders prefer 30mm on the binding edge for sewing and 20mm on the 3 other edges. If you have used Word to produce your work then standard margins will be acceptable. Ensure that fold-outs and diagrams produced have reasonable margins and that page numbers, headers and footers are away from the edge.

How do I know if it has printed correctly?

Although we take great care to see that your thesis is printed correctly we strongly recommend that you view all printed copies before they are sent for binding. We can not accept responsibility for any errors or omissions however caused at a later time.

How long does it take to print?

Our standard turnaround time is 24hrs. Additional charges will apply for same day printing.

What paper do you use to  print it?

Our standard paper is 100gsm Elemental Chlorine Free from sustainable forests. We also use recycled, cotton and other types at extra costs. Please ask if you require a different paper, we are happy to  accommodate.

print thesis cambridge

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The Department Print Room offers a range of services to members of the Department, staff of other University departments, and private customers. See the Department's IT Services site for details .

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We are closed Friday 30 th October and Monday 2 nd November for Health and Safety Training. We can still accept e-mails but not telephone calls during that time.

Loyd Grossman OBE collecting his Cambridge Ph.D. thesis from our workshop.

Visit our  Thesis Binding  website. -->

We offer the following types of binding for all universities:

  • Wire binding
  • Comb binding
  • Spiral binding
  • Channel binding
  • Full cloth soft binding
  • Thermal crimped binding
  • Soft binding with acetate front cover and cloth spine
  • Hard case binding with embossing on either the spine only or the spine and front cover.

print thesis cambridge

A4, 100gsm white paper. Please note that letter or U.S. letter format will not be accepted.

Examiners’ copies:   the preference is for single-sided print.

University Library/Department copies :  the preference is for double-sided (duplex) print.

Soft binding

If a soft bound copy is submitted in the following format eg. comb or spiral it will certainly be necessary to provide a new copy for hard binding as these create holes that would weaken conventional binding and will lead to an unacceptable loss of margin.

The following versions are recommended as in some circumstances they could be used as donor copies for hard binding:

Full cloth soft binding in Arbelave Library buckram. Colour choice up to the individual. Lettered on spine in gold (hot foil embossing, not digital foil printing) with candidate’s initials and surname, degree and year running from top to bottom. This must all be in capital letters (apart from Ph.D.)

-acetate soft binding (a clear plastic front cover with a black cloth spine and back). No lettering as the title page is visible.

-channel (metal) binding (a clear plastic front cover with a flat metal spine and black card back). No lettering as the title page is visible.

-thermal crimped binding (a clear front cover and frosted back). No lettering as the title page is visible.

Hard case binding

Preferably to be sewn on an OMCOA oversewing machine (as recommended by the University Library) or oversewn sections that are then hand sewn.

Hard case binding to be bound in cloth material Arbelave Library buckram (as recommended by the University Library).  Colour choice is up to the individual.  In general, the thickness of a single volume (excluding the case) should not exceed 7cm. Lettering on the spine (hot foil embossing, not digital foil printing) should consist of title, initials and surname in gold running from top to bottom. This must all be in capital letters(unless part of the title requires lower case).

If the thesis or dissertation consists of more than one volume, the spine must also bear the number of each volume.

J. S. Wilson & Son, Thesis Binding and Bookbinding

The knowledge of Craft/Thesis Binding has been passed down through generations since 1830 onto current staff, enabling us to offer you the best all-round service possible. The earliest recorded bound and catalogued dissertation held at Cambridge University Library dates back to 1901, and was bound by J. S. Wilson & Son. We can cater for any type of Thesis or Dissertation Binding at our workshop in Cambridge. We can also offer quick turnaround Thesis Binding for last minute deadlines!

J. S. Wilson & Son (Bookbinders) Ltd, Unit 17 Ronald Rolph Court, Wadloes Road, Cambridge, CB5 8PX, United Kingdom

+44 (0) 1223 212420

info @jswilsonandson.co.uk

OPENING HOURS

Monday to Thursday 8.00am - 4.00pm

Friday 8.00am - Midday

Saturday Appointment by arrangement

NEXT DAY SERVICE

Please note this is on Thesis Binding only

We accept all major payment cards

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Community News for the week of May 20, 2024

Week of may 20, 2024.

The following announcements are as of May 17.

Events and Seminars

May 29-31: MIT Commencement. [ Details ]

May 30: ChemE Graduation Luncheon, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., Eastman Courtyard Tent. [ Details ]

June 23-28: The Twenty-Fourth International Conference on the Science and Applications of Nanotubes and Low-Dimensional Materials. [ Details ]

See ChemE calendar for more listing of department events and seminars >>

Thesis Defense

Internships, fellowships, and job opportunities.

MIT Introduction to Technology, Engineering, & Science : Paid instructor & TA positions. [ Details ]

MIT Graduate Community Fellow : [ See current positions and apply ]

Search for more faculty positions around the world at PolytechnicPositions.com See listing of upcoming career-related events, workshops, and company info sessions>>

Other Announcements

May 21: Application due to attend GREAT Symposium in June (virtual). [ Details ]

May 31: Application due for Asian Deans’ Forum ’24 – The Rising Stars Women in Engineering Workshop (Nov, 2024). [ Details ]

MIT Energy and Climate Club: Present your energy research at a MITEC seminar. [ Signup ]

Chancellor’s Innovation Fund: Info sessions and application [ Details ]

MIT Spouses & Partners Connect : Language Conversation Exchange events. [ See Calendar ]

D-Lab Energy: Introduction to Energy in Global Development. [ Register now! ]

Food@MIT Guide: How to access healthy & affordable food at MIT. [ Details ]

Student Support Services (S3): Help in an accessible & respectful environment. [ virtual & walk-in locations ]

MIT Alumni Advisors Hub: Signup to connect with MIT alumni for career conversations. [ Details ]

Become an iREFS to offer confidential, peer-to-peer conflict management coaching and support to graduate students at MIT! Email [email protected]

REFS (Resources for Easing Friction and Stress): Feeling stressed? We are here to help. Email: [email protected] | Website: web.mit.edu/refs-x/

In big local tech deal, song-generating AI startup Suno raises $125 million

Microsoft added Suno to its Copilot app last year.

Suno, an artificial intelligence startup that helps people generate original songs, has raised $125 million of venture capital, the company said on Tuesday. It’s one of the biggest funding rounds of the year for a local tech company.

The Cambridge-based startup put its app online less than a year ago and said 10 million people have already used it to make music.

“Our community of musicians deserves the very best tools, and building the very best tools requires the very best talent — not just technological expertise, but a genuine love of music,” cofounder and chief executive Mikey Shulman wrote in a blog post announcing the deal. “We will use this funding to accelerate product development and grow our team of music makers, music lovers, and technologists.”

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V3 IS HERE 💥 We are excited to introduce our first model capable of producing radio-quality music. v3 allows you to make full, 2 minute songs in seconds and is now available to all users. Try it for free here: https://t.co/s2hNzxc87W Thank you to our Pro + Premier members; v3… pic.twitter.com/ZmRm8XnZcw — Suno (@suno_ai_) March 21, 2024

Shulman, who has a PhD in physics from Harvard, previously headed machine learning at Cambridge financial software company Kensho Technologies.

Suno, which means “listen” in Hindi, is one of hundreds of new startups trying to commercialize generative AI technology that can mimic creative processes like writing, drawing, and making music. Popularized by California startup OpenAI’s ChatGPT app, generative AI has become a focus of the largest tech companies. Microsoft added Suno to its Copilot app last year.

Users can simply type in a genre of music and a theme or scene, and the Suno app generates two full songs that can be saved or downloaded. To avoid copyright problems, the app won’t accept the name of a real song or artist as part of the prompt to create a song.

The Suno app’s songwriting talents are similar to features now found in some other generative AI apps. ChatGPT, for example, offers an add-on in the app’s GPT Store called Song Maker.

The new fundraising was led by VC firm Lightspeed Venture Partners in Silicon Valley and also included Cambridge firms Matrix Partners and Founder Collective, as well as former GitHub CEO Nat Friedman and his investing partner Daniel Gross.

The $125 million deal is the second-largest this year in Massachusetts for non-biotech venture capital deals. Battery recycler Ascend Elements in Westborough raised $162 million in February . The deal also comes at a time when VC funding remains at much lower levels than in prior years. In the first quarter, Massachusetts-based companies raised $3.1 billion, a 16 percent decline from the same period of 2023 and the lowest quarterly total since 2019.

Aaron Pressman can be reached at [email protected] . Follow him @ampressman .

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COMMENTS

  1. Submitting your hardbound and electronic thesis ...

    The two Cambridge Bookbinders listed above accept an electronic copy of the thesis and will arrange for printing, binding and delivery to the Student Registry. Please note that this is only a service offered by the two bookbinders directly - the Cambridge SU do not offer this service.

  2. Theses & Dissertations: Home

    Finding a Cambridge PhD thesis online via the institutional repository. The University's institutional repository, Apollo, holds full-text digital versions of over 11,000 Cambridge PhD theses and is a rapidly growing collection deposited by Cambridge Ph.D. graduates.Theses in Apollo can be browsed via this link.More information on how to access theses by University of Cambridge students can be ...

  3. Submitting your thesis for examination (PhD, EdD ...

    What happens following submission of the thesis for examination. When you submit your thesis for examination the Degree Committee will check the submission, acknowledge receipt, and inform Student Registry you have submitted. The Student Registry will update your CamSIS record. The Degree Committee will forward your thesis to your examiners.

  4. Theses

    PhD Students (and the following Doctoral students: Doctor of Business, Doctor of Engineering, Doctor of Education, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Medicine under Special Regulations) are required to deposit an electronic copy of their thesis in the University of Cambridge's institutional repository, Apollo.

  5. Finding and accessing theses

    How do I find a Cambridge thesis? Ph.D., M.Litt., M.Sc., and Divinity M.Phil. theses approved after 1970 are catalogued in iDiscover, as are M.D. and M.Chir. theses approved after May 2006. ... Researchers can order a copy of an unpublished thesis which was deposited in print form through the Library's ...

  6. How do I access a dissertation from the University of Cambridge

    Finding print dissertations. The University Library holds all Cambridge dissertations from 1921 onwards and they can be ordered from the Manuscript Reading Room (01223 333143, [email protected] ). They can't be borrowed or supplied for inter-library loan. Information on finding theses and dissertations can be found on the Theses Libguide .

  7. PhD thesis formatting

    One Cambridge thesis-binding company, J.S. Wilson & Son, recommend on their web page to leave 30 mm margin on the spine and 20 mm on the other three sides of the A4 pages sent to them. About a centimetre of the left margin is lost when the binder stitches the pages together. ... choose a layout suitable for double-sided printing (required for ...

  8. PhD: thesis submission and examination

    Where and what to submit. You should submit an electronic pdf copy of your thesis via the Engineering Degree Committee thesis submission Moodle site. Please name the file "PhD_ Your CRSid.pdf" so that it is identifiable. Providing examiners have been appointed, your thesis will be forwarded to the examiners within two days of receipt by the GSO.

  9. The PhD thesis

    The PhD thesis. The doctoral thesis should contain material of sufficient originality to merit publication. The original material should be adequate to form a substantial basis of a monograph or at least two journal articles. The thesis should demonstrate the candidate's command of the relevant literature. The thesis should be a coherent piece ...

  10. MPhil: thesis submission and examination

    You should submit an electronic pdf copy of your thesis via the Engineering Degree Committee thesis submission Moodle site. Please name the file "MPhil_Your CRSid.pdf" so that it is identifiable. The MPhil in Engineering is examined by dissertation only. You will be required to take two modules and take part in a Researcher Development Course ...

  11. Submitting your thesis

    The Department of Computer Science and Technology will expect you to submit your thesis as a Technical Report. Once you have done this, the electronic version of your thesis is removed from the filer. If you have any questions not covered above, please consult the Secretary of the Degree Committee. Secretary of the Degree Committee, October ...

  12. Theses

    Printed theses held in Cambridge. Copies of all postgraduate theses written by students at the University of Cambridge must be deposited in Cambridge University Library. Their online Theses catalogue contains records of theses approved from 1970 onwards. For pre-1970 theses there is a card catalogue in the Manuscripts Reading Room.

  13. Dissertations and theses

    Recently completed Cambridge PhD theses are available via Apollo, the University Repository (unless under embargo). You can also search for the full text of PhD theses across the UK using the British Library's EThOS service or browse the Proquest Dissertations and Theses database for research across 700 academic institutions worldwide.

  14. Writing, submitting and examination

    This section has information on submitting dissertations and theses for examination. PhD, EdD, MSc, MLitt and MD. Research Best Practice. Preparing to Submit. Word limits. Submitting the thesis for examination. The Oral Examination (viva-voce 'viva') MPhil/MRes. CPGS.

  15. Dissertation databases

    This database includes 2.4 million dissertations and theses citations, representing 700 leading academic institutions worldwide from 1861 to the present day. It offers full text for most of the dissertations added since 1997 and strong retrospective full text coverage for older graduate works. Each dissertation published since 1980 includes a ...

  16. Preparing your dissertation for printing and binding

    Cambridge Endangered Languages and Cultures Group (CELC) Cambridge Endangered Languages and Cultures Group (CELC) overview; Seminar Series; ... Allow plenty of time for the final stages of formatting your dissertation, printing and binding it, and submitting it before the deadline. Make sure you have a back-up plan ready in case you have ...

  17. Theses, dissertations and prize essays

    There are now over 39,000 volumes. Contact: Manuscripts Reading Room (01223 333143, [email protected]) Cambridge theses held by CUL. Finding and ordering Cambridge theses. A small but growing proportion of Cambridge theses are available to consult in digital form in the university repository Apollo. See the Office of Scholarly Communication's ...

  18. Print Shop

    Simply drop off your thesis or print at Cambridge SU Reception by 3 pm on Thursday and it will be ready for collection from the SU Lounge the following Friday. Please note that the Cambridge SU, Reception & Services will be closed on Friday, the 29th of March & Monday, the 1st of April. We will reopen at 9:30 am on Tuesday, the 2nd of April.

  19. Printing, copying and scanning

    You can also view your transaction and print job history, print and copying rates, and your environmental impact. You can also use cash at some participating Colleges and Departments to buy credit. The minimum top-up is £1, which buys about 20 black and white A4 sheets of printing or copying.

  20. THESIS

    We are thesis and dissertation printing specialists with over 25 years of experience printing for students in the UK and overseas. top of page. [email protected] +44 (0)1223 242000. REQUEST A CALL BACK ... 1 Ronald Rolph Court, Wadloes Road, Cambridge, United Kingdom CB5 8PX.

  21. Printing Services

    The Department Print Room offers a range of services to members of the Department, staff of other University departments, and private customers. See the Department's IT Services site for details. ... Cambridge CB2 1PZ United Kingdom Tel: +44 1223 332600 ...

  22. Bookbinders Cambridge

    J. S. Wilson & Son, Thesis Binding and Bookbinding. The knowledge of Craft/Thesis Binding has been passed down through generations since 1830 onto current staff, enabling us to offer you the best all-round service possible. The earliest recorded bound and catalogued dissertation held at Cambridge University Library dates back to 1901, and was ...

  23. Thesis Binding

    The knowledge of Craft/Thesis Binding has been passed down through generations since 1830 onto current staff, enabling us to offer you the best all-round service possible. The earliest recorded bound and catalogued dissertation held at Cambridge University Library dates back to 1901, and was bound by J. S. Wilson & Son.

  24. Community News for the week of May 20, 2024

    Events and Seminars. May 29-31: MIT Commencement. [May 30: ChemE Graduation Luncheon, 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m., Eastman Courtyard Tent. [June 23-28: The Twenty-Fourth International Conference on the Science and Applications of Nanotubes and Low-Dimensional Materials. [See ChemE calendar for more listing of department events and seminars >>

  25. Cambridge shooting: Two injured in shooting at Donnelly Field

    Two people were shot Thursday night at Donnelly Field park in Cambridge, police said. The gunfire was reported at 9:39 p.m., and a 23-year-old man and a 22-year-old woman, both of Cambridge, were ...

  26. Takeda laying off 641 workers in Massachusetts

    Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg. Takeda Pharmaceutical, the largest drug maker in Massachusetts by headcount, on Friday confirmed that it plans to lay off 641 employees in the state between early July and ...

  27. Update Cambridge police seeks public help in sex assault probe

    The public is asked to review any footage they may have of the Cambridgepark Drive area between the hours of 5 p.m. and midnight on May 17. Anyone with information should contact Cambridge police ...

  28. Biogen acquires Hi-Bio, California biotech, for $1.15 billion

    Biogen said Wednesday it will acquire a California biotech that specializes in diseases of the immune system for $1.15 billion upfront as the Cambridge drugmaker seeks to bolster its pipeline of ...

  29. Cambridge councilors want to legalize six-story buildings

    Last Friday, the Cambridge Citizens Coalition, a resident group that has frequently opposed upzoning proposals, published its opposition to the proposal. Allowing six-stories everywhere, the group ...

  30. Music AI startup Suno raises $125 million

    The Cambridge-based startup put its app online less than a year ago and said 10 million people have already used it to make music.