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How to Restate a Thesis

Last Updated: February 27, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was reviewed by Gerald Posner . Gerald Posner is an Author & Journalist based in Miami, Florida. With over 35 years of experience, he specializes in investigative journalism, nonfiction books, and editorials. He holds a law degree from UC College of the Law, San Francisco, and a BA in Political Science from the University of California-Berkeley. He’s the author of thirteen books, including several New York Times bestsellers, the winner of the Florida Book Award for General Nonfiction, and has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History. He was also shortlisted for the Best Business Book of 2020 by the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 383,646 times.

A thesis statement serves as your paper’s (or speech’s) guiding idea, alerting readers to the main points of your paper and the direction it will take. A thesis restatement, which comes in the paper’s conclusion, is the thesis’s kindred spirit, though not its identical twin. It differs from the thesis in both word choice and sentence structure. Restating your thesis at the end of the paper allows you to remind your readers of what you have proven in your body paragraphs and helps to bring your paper to a successful close.

Working out the Restatement Basics

Step 1 Decide on a place for the restatement.

  • Sketching out a rough conclusion (the main points you want to get across) will give you an idea of the best place for the restated thesis before you actually try your hand at writing the restatement.
  • Depending on the nature of your paper or of your conclusion, you may want to open your conclusion with a question or some other kind of rhetorical device, rather than a restatement of the thesis. While writing often follows prescribed formulas (such as the 5-paragraph essay), there is no one-size-fits-all approach for writing a concluding paragraph, and you may need to try out several positions for your thesis restatement to find out what works best.

Step 2 Capitalize on the work you’ve done.

  • You can use the restated thesis to provide a greater level of sophistication or emotional impact to the original argument. For example, if your initial argument was that buying pets as holiday gifts is dangerous, you might restate your thesis this way: "Remember: buying that puppy as a Christmas present might seem like a good idea at the time, but it could end in the tragedy of another homeless dog by Easter."
  • You can also restate your thesis to incorporate the relationship you've built with your reader. For example, if your essay was about developing business partnerships, you could begin your restatement by saying something like, "As a businessperson...." Not only will this make your restatement different from the original, but it will also help draw connections with important elements from the essay/speech.

Step 3 Answer the

  • For example, if you have written an essay about alcohol use on college campuses, you could revisit the "So what?" question in your conclusion by providing a statement about what that means for students and for college officials. It could look something like this: "Because alcohol abuse depends on more than just the legal drinking age, it is crucial that students be educated about how alcohol abuse occurs, and also that college officials broaden their perspective to include a greater variety of aspects."

Step 4 Avoid clichés.

  • You may be able to use something like “In conclusion” at the end of a speech, however. Signaling or signposting words—like “in conclusion” or “next”—are very important in speeches because listeners only have one chance to follow along with what you’re saying, and these words help them to keep their place.

Step 5 Don’t apologize.

  • Avoid saying things like, “It seems like” or “It is possible that” in the restatement. One exception would be if this conditional language is part of your original thesis statement and your paper is devoted to discussing a topic that is only a possibility, not something you are stating is definitely the case. Otherwise, maintain a level of confidence.
  • While maintaining confidence is crucial to the success of your paper, it’s important to acknowledge when opposition exists and not to use absolute statements which may alienate readers. Confidence in your position and in the fact that you’ve proven your point is one thing; blind certainty in your opinion is another!

Making the Restatement Distinct from the Thesis

Step 1 Use different words.

  • You can use your word processor’s thesaurus function for this, an online thesaurus, or a good old-fashioned paper thesaurus. If you use a thesaurus, however, check your chosen word in the dictionary to ensure that you know its precise meaning. Thesauruses group words very loosely by general meaning, and there is often a significant difference in connotation between them.
  • It’s not necessary to change every single word, such as prepositions (“in,” “on,” “above,” “over”) and articles (“a,” “an,” and “the”). Spend your time focusing on words/phrases that receive the most emphasis, like those that are central to the points you’re making.

Step 2 Change the structure.

  • Try varying your sentences by starting with different parts of speech. For example, if you began the original thesis with a prepositional phrase, start the restatement with the subject of the sentence. For instance, if the thesis starts out “Around the turn of the nineteenth century in England, women frequently…”, you might start your restatement out with something like “Women in early nineteenth-century….”
  • Another way to vary the structure is to present your points in a different order. Many thesis statements include three ideas, presented in the order in which they will be discussed in the body paragraphs. When restating, you can list the points in an alternate order.

Step 3 Split the points up.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • When restating your thesis, if you find that the statement doesn’t fit your paper anymore, you’ll want to go back to the body of your paper and try to find where things went off track. You may find that you need to revise the original thesis to reflect what you actually wrote in the paper, or that parts of the body of the paper need to be revised to better suit the thesis. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • While restating your thesis is essential to the conclusion of your paper or speech, it’s not enough. You will need to emphasize main points and, depending on the assignment/goal of the paper, you may also need to call your audience to action, discuss the implications of what you have talked about in the paper, or make predictions for the future. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Think of the restatement as a new, more powerful version of your thesis—you’ve written the paper and learned a lot over that process, and now you have all of this knowledge to draw on. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

how to restate your thesis statement in the conclusion paragraph

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How to write an excellent thesis conclusion [with examples]

Tips for writing thesis conclusion

Restate the thesis

Review or reiterate key points of your work, explain why your work is relevant, a take-away for the reader, more resources on writing thesis conclusions, frequently asked questions about writing an excellent thesis conclusion, related articles.

At this point in your writing, you have most likely finished your introduction and the body of your thesis, dissertation, or research paper . While this is a reason to celebrate, you should not underestimate the importance of your conclusion. The conclusion is the last thing that your reader will see, so it should be memorable.

A good conclusion will review the key points of the thesis and explain to the reader why the information is relevant, applicable, or related to the world as a whole. Make sure to dedicate enough of your writing time to the conclusion and do not put it off until the very last minute.

This article provides an effective technique for writing a conclusion adapted from Erika Eby’s The College Student's Guide to Writing a Good Research Paper: 101 Easy Tips & Tricks to Make Your Work Stand Out .

While the thesis introduction starts out with broad statements about the topic, and then narrows it down to the thesis statement , a thesis conclusion does the same in the opposite order.

  • Restate the thesis.
  • Review or reiterate key points of your work.
  • Explain why your work is relevant.
  • Include a core take-away message for the reader.

Tip: Don’t just copy and paste your thesis into your conclusion. Restate it in different words.

The best way to start a conclusion is simply by restating the thesis statement. That does not mean just copying and pasting it from the introduction, but putting it into different words.

You will need to change the structure and wording of it to avoid sounding repetitive. Also, be firm in your conclusion just as you were in the introduction. Try to avoid sounding apologetic by using phrases like "This paper has tried to show..."

The conclusion should address all the same parts as the thesis while making it clear that the reader has reached the end. You are telling the reader that your research is finished and what your findings are.

I have argued throughout this work that the point of critical mass for biopolitical immunity occurred during the Romantic period because of that era's unique combination of post-revolutionary politics and innovations in smallpox prevention. In particular, I demonstrated that the French Revolution and the discovery of vaccination in the 1790s triggered a reconsideration of the relationship between bodies and the state.

Tip: Try to reiterate points from your introduction in your thesis conclusion.

The next step is to review the main points of the thesis as a whole. Look back at the body of of your project and make a note of the key ideas. You can reword these ideas the same way you reworded your thesis statement and then incorporate that into the conclusion.

You can also repeat striking quotations or statistics, but do not use more than two. As the conclusion represents your own closing thoughts on the topic , it should mainly consist of your own words.

In addition, conclusions can contain recommendations to the reader or relevant questions that further the thesis. You should ask yourself:

  • What you would ideally like to see your readers do in reaction to your paper?
  • Do you want them to take a certain action or investigate further?
  • Is there a bigger issue that your paper wants to draw attention to?

Also, try to reference your introduction in your conclusion. You have already taken a first step by restating your thesis. Now, check whether there are other key words, phrases or ideas that are mentioned in your introduction that fit into your conclusion. Connecting the introduction to the conclusion in this way will help readers feel satisfied.

I explored how Mary Wollstonecraft, in both her fiction and political writings, envisions an ideal medico-political state, and how other writers like William Wordsworth and Mary Shelley increasingly imagined the body politic literally, as an incorporated political collective made up of bodies whose immunity to political and medical ills was essential to a healthy state.

Tip: Make sure to explain why your thesis is relevant to your field of research.

Although you can encourage readers to question their opinions and reflect on your topic, do not leave loose ends. You should provide a sense of resolution and make sure your conclusion wraps up your argument. Make sure you explain why your thesis is relevant to your field of research and how your research intervenes within, or substantially revises, existing scholarly debates.

This project challenged conventional ideas about the relationship among Romanticism, medicine, and politics by reading the unfolding of Romantic literature and biopolitical immunity as mutual, co-productive processes. In doing so, this thesis revises the ways in which biopolitics has been theorized by insisting on the inherent connections between Romantic literature and the forms of biopower that characterize early modernity.

Tip: If you began your thesis with an anecdote or historical example, you may want to return to that in your conclusion.

End your conclusion with something memorable, such as:

  • a call to action
  • a recommendation
  • a gesture towards future research
  • a brief explanation of how the problem or idea you covered remains relevant

Ultimately, you want readers to feel more informed, or ready to act, as they read your conclusion.

Yet, the Romantic period is only the beginning of modern thought on immunity and biopolitics. Victorian writers, doctors, and politicians upheld the Romantic idea that a "healthy state" was a literal condition that could be achieved by combining politics and medicine, but augmented that idea through legislation and widespread public health measures. While many nineteenth-century efforts to improve citizens' health were successful, the fight against disease ultimately changed course in the twentieth century as global immunological threats such as SARS occupied public consciousness. Indeed, as subsequent public health events make apparent, biopolitical immunity persists as a viable concept for thinking about the relationship between medicine and politics in modernity.

Need more advice? Read our 5 additional tips on how to write a good thesis conclusion.

The conclusion is the last thing that your reader will see, so it should be memorable. To write a great thesis conclusion you should:

The basic content of a conclusion is to review the main points from the paper. This part represents your own closing thoughts on the topic. It should mainly consist of the outcome of the research in your own words.

The length of the conclusion will depend on the length of the whole thesis. Usually, a conclusion should be around 5-7% of the overall word count.

End your conclusion with something memorable, such as a question, warning, or call to action. Depending on the topic, you can also end with a recommendation.

In Open Access: Theses and Dissertations you can find thousands of completed works. Take a look at any of the theses or dissertations for real-life examples of conclusions that were already approved.

how to restate your thesis statement in the conclusion paragraph

How to Restate a Thesis: Various Approaches to Restating Your Thesis

image

Table of contents

  • 1 Understanding the Purpose of Restating a Thesis
  • 2.1 Paraphrasing.
  • 2.2 Summarizing.
  • 2.3 Reflecting.
  • 2.4 Significance.
  • 2.5 Rhetorical Devices.
  • 2.6 Emotional Appeal.
  • 2.7 Call to Action.
  • 2.8 Broader Context.
  • 2.9 Engaging Language.
  • 2.10 Memorable Statement.
  • 3.1 Understand the purpose of restatement
  • 3.2 Avoid clichés and overused phrases
  • 3.3 Be specific and avoid vague language
  • 3.4 Keep it concise
  • 3.5 Reflect on the essay’s journey
  • 3.6 Emphasize the significance
  • 3.7 Check for coherence
  • 3.8 Avoid introducing new ideas

A thesis statement guarantees that your essay will be read, and a paraphrased thesis states that the main points of your essay will be remembered. Students have already heard about the importance of formulating a thesis statement to interest the reader in your written work. However, inexperienced authors often forget to restate the thesis.

The purpose of the successful thesis restatement is to reinforce the essay’s main idea. This way, you intensify the original argument and influence the reader’s mind. For your research paper to be convincing, it must be coherent. For this reason, the thesis and the restated thesis should not contradict but complement each other.

In this article, detailed instructions will help you restate your thesis and make your essay memorable. Our experienced specialists are ready to share with you the most working strategies for high-quality rewording of the thesis. Moreover, we want to make it easier for you and have created a checklist of the necessary details to consider to restate your thesis effectively.

Understanding the Purpose of Restating a Thesis

We remind you that the thesis statement is a claim that summarizes the main idea of your essay. It is often used as the first sentence in the introductory paragraph to dedicate the reader to the context of the written work. However, a good thesis statement is not limited to the first paragraph. In academic and persuasive writing, for example, there is a need to restate the original thesis to maintain coherence.

What does restate thesis mean? Let’s start with the fact that a restated thesis is a statement based on the original thesis used in the concluding paragraph or throughout the body paragraphs. Quoting the original thesis statement word by word will not be effective, so you have to analyze the original meaning and reword it. You may use a paraphrasing tool in case you struggle with an issue of how to restate a thesis.

You must be wondering why restating a thesis statement in the conclusion paragraph is so important. It is sometimes difficult for the reader to follow your thought course while reading. Remember when you read a book, then by the last page, you begin to forget about what happened at the beginning. To regularly refresh the reader’s memory of your argument, you need to recall it by restating the original thesis statement in the essay’s conclusion paragraph and body paragraphs.

Thus, the thesis claim should permeate your essay. Each part should contain a reminder of the central idea to reinforce the perceived significance of the thesis word. The restated thesis acts as a link between the main components of your essay. It’s necessary to restate the thesis in conclusion, connect it with topic sentences and provide a logical analysis flow.

Strategies for Restating a Thesis Effectively

Unfortunately, a simple understanding of the importance of restructuring the thesis is insufficient. It is also necessary to understand the primary strategies for good restating. Our PapersOwl experts have prepared a list with good examples for you on how to restate a thesis statement effectively. The most effective strategies are:

Paraphrasing.

Reword your original thesis statement using different words and changing the sentence structure. With this technique, the form changes, but not the main point.

Initial thesis: The desegregation of public schools is considered to be the key purpose of the Civil Rights Movement.

Restatement: The anti-segregation movement in America was aimed at equalizing public schools.

Summarizing.

In this technique, you should analyze and summarize the overall meaning of the original point in the introduction. Thus, the statement will be concise and informative.

Initial thesis: Increased anxiety and stress exposure by the mother during pregnancy can negatively affect the intrauterine development of the child, making his nervous system more vulnerable to stress.

Restatement: A pregnant mother’s stress can make a child more anxious.

Reflecting.

Link your restated thesis to the ideas you uncovered in the body paragraph of the paper.

Initial thesis: The opportunities for women to develop professionally were historically equal to the career prospects of men, or were they?

Restatement of thesis: In the nineteenth century, the inequality in the career opportunities of the two sexes was drastic.

Significance.

Emphasize that the thought you expressed in the original thesis statement is so crucial that it is worth developing in restating the thesis.

Initial thesis: The lack of sex education in schools and families leads to increased unwanted pregnancies among adolescents.

Restatement: Again, 50% of pregnancies among teenagers are unwanted. As a result of the lack of sex education, the total number of teenage pregnancies continues to grow.

Rhetorical Devices.

Use rhetorical techniques in your thesis statement, such as parallelism and repetition, to enhance the persuasiveness of the paper and rephrase the original contribution.

Initial thesis: The film provides a detailed picture for our eyes.

Restatement: The film provides a detailed picture for our eyes, and a book provides an even more detailed image for our mind.

Emotional Appeal.

Use a moving phrase or concept to appeal to the reader’s emotions to enhance interaction. If you don’t know how to apply this technique, try asking for help with college papers , and get expert help.

e.g. How long must pass before people realize that their grandchildren will suffer from the consequences of environmental disasters.

Call to Action.

Formulate your paper’s central argument, and motivate the reader to take action by introducing a thesis restatement in the conclusion.

Example: Do not delay, nature needs your intervention right now, sort garbage responsibly!

Broader Context.

Explain to the reader the background of your thought.

Example: Initial thesis: The world was a millimeter far from a nuclear war.

Restatement: In the 20th century, the development of the nuclear industry reached such a level that the advanced countries were on the verge of starting a nuclear war.

Engaging Language.

Use vocabulary that is close and understandable to the reader.

Example: Lack of sleep is the major reason for heart diseases, so don’t worry, go take a nap!

Memorable Statement.

A powerful version of your original claim has a good potential to be remembered by readers.

Example: Realizing that you owe nothing to anyone is difficult, but only by recognizing this do you begin to live for real.

Checklist to help you ensure an effective restatement of your thesis

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Now that you’re familiar with working strategies for paraphrasing a thesis statement, as well as with illustrative examples, it’s time to stock up on all the tips from our experienced writers. We have created a checklist of eight points you need to follow to know how to write a thesis statement for the conclusion section so that most professors truly value your writing.

Understand the purpose of restatement

Understanding the reasons and motivation for your actions gives you the key to rephrase a thesis right. Having realized the primary goal of restating your thesis statement will help you articulate it more clearly. Remember that this writing technique exists to strengthen your arguments and improve their perception by readers. So let’s see how to restate a thesis for your conclusion and write a perfect paper.

Avoid clichés and overused phrases

The reader will not be interested in hackneyed formulations, absolute statements, and overused concepts in your thesis restatement. Our brain always demands novelty, so unique information will attract more attention and arouse interest in your research paper. Try to make your thesis restatement look fresh and intriguing.

Be specific and avoid vague language

Vague concepts, conditional language, overly long sentences, and oversimplification of information will make your thesis statements more boring. Do not think that your reader is a fool. On the contrary, provide him with food for thought. Also, reconsider the sentence structure, for it not to be too weary, use different words to be diverse.

Keep it concise

An excellent conclusion thesis restatement should be concise, giving only the most necessary context to make it easier to understand. You can expand on your idea in more detail in the following main paragraphs. To get a perfect reworded thesis, use the thesis statement generator to make the process easier. Still, to make rephrasing effective, it should be concise, write shorter sentences and use different words.

Reflect on the essay’s journey

Summarize your main ideas. After all, the thesis restatement is precisely the information you want the reader to remember the most. Why don’t you recall once again the main points and central claims of your writing? Use grammar tenses to convey your point. Perhaps your original statement was written in the present or future tense, then use past tense to show you’ve accomplished your ideas. Or, at the beginning of your writing, you used a sentence with a subject. So, restate the thesis in the conclusion with a prepositional phrase instead.

Emphasize the significance

Your opinion and your words must be heard. Emphasize the importance of your ideas with a strong conclusion paragraph thesis restatement. Choose the right strategy for your body paragraphs and paper’s conclusion to sound more convincing. Restate the thesis so that the reader has no doubts regarding the expertise of your writing and the words you say.

Check for coherence

Do not forget about the connection between the thesis sentence in the introduction paragraph and the restatement in the essay conclusion section and the main body. Follow the logic of the presentation of your thoughts when you restate claim. Your paper should not contain contradictory words and statements.

Avoid introducing new ideas

New and creative ideas are good, but they should be pre-planned as part of your paper. An unexpected and unforeseen conclusion that isn’t related to the research problem can confuse the reader at the end of the essay. Stick to your original concepts and the same meaning for the coherence of your writing. Rewrite existing concepts to reinforce your introduction thesis statement.

A thesis statement is an effective technique for attracting the attention of the reader, as well as ensuring his interest. However, using a thesis statement only in the introductory paragraph will not provide you with the desired result. For a more comprehensive result, you will have to rephrase a thesis statement a few more times in the writing process.

No strong conclusion is complete without a good reworded thesis. Remember to connect the rephrasing to the main research question. Use our strategies to write an effective thesis and get a well-deserved assessment from the teacher. Stick to our recommendations to make your paraphrased thesis effective.

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Writing conclusions.

Though expectations vary from one discipline to the next, the conclusion of your paper is generally a place to explore the implications of your topic or argument. In other words, the end of your paper is a place to look outward or ahead in order to explain why you made the points you did.

Writing the Conclusion

In the past, you may have been told that your conclusion should summarize what you have already said by restating your thesis and main points. It is often helpful to restate your argument in the conclusion, particularly in a longer paper, but most professors and instructors want students to go beyond simply repeating what they have already said. Restating your thesis is just a short first part of your conclusion. Make sure that you are not simply repeating yourself; your restated thesis should use new and interesting language.

After you have restated your thesis, you should not just summarize the key points of your argument. Your conclusion should offer the reader something new to think about—or, at the very least, it should offer the reader a new way of thinking about what you have said in your paper.

You can employ one of several strategies for taking your conclusion that important step further:

  • Answer the question, "So what?"
  • Connect to a larger theme from the course
  • Complicate your claim with an outside source
  • Pose a new research question as a result of your paper's findings
  • Address the limitations of your argument

The strategy you employ in writing a conclusion for your paper may depend upon a number of factors:

  • The conventions of the discipline in which you are writing
  • The tone of your paper (whether your paper is analytical, argumentative, explanatory, etc.)
  • Whether your paper is meant to be formal or informal

Choose a strategy that best maintains the flow and tone of your paper while allowing you to adequately tie together all aspects of your paper.

The Final "So what?" Strategy

Part of generating a thesis statement sometimes requires answering the "so what?" question—that is, explaining the significance of your basic assertion. When you use the "so what?" strategy to write your conclusion, you are considering what some of the implications of your argument might be beyond the points already made in your paper. This strategy allows you to leave readers with an understanding of why your argument is important in a broader context or how it can apply to a larger concept.

For example, consider a paper about alcohol abuse in universities. If the paper argues that alcohol abuse among students depends more on psychological factors than simply the availability of alcohol on campus, a "so what?" conclusion might tie together threads from the body of the paper to suggest that universities are not approaching alcohol education from the most effective perspective when they focus exclusively on limiting students' access to alcohol.

To use this strategy, ask yourself, "How does my argument affect how I approach the text or issue?"

The "Connecting to a Course Theme" Strategy

When you use the "connecting to a course theme" strategy to write your conclusion, you are establishing a connection between your paper's thesis and a larger theme or idea from the course for which you are writing your paper.

For example, consider a paper about mothers and daughters in Eudora Welty's Delta Wedding for a class called "The Inescapable South." This paper argues that a strong dependence on the mother is analogous to a strong dependence on the South. A "connecting to a course theme" conclusion for this paper might propose that Welty's daughter characters demonstrate what type of people can and cannot escape the South.

To use this strategy, ask yourself, "What is an overall theme of this course? How does my paper's thesis connect?"

The "Complicating Your Claim" Strategy

When you use the "complicating your claim" strategy to write your conclusion, you are using one or more additional resources to develop a more nuanced final thesis. Such additional resources could include a new outside source or textual evidence that seemingly contradicts your argument.

For example, consider a paper about Ireland's neutrality during World War II. This paper argues that Ireland refused to enter the war because it wanted to assert its sovereignty, not because it had no opinion about the conflict. A "complicating your claim" conclusion for this paper might provide historical evidence that Ireland did aid the Allies, suggesting that the Irish were more influenced by international diplomacy than their formal neutrality might suggest.

To use this strategy, ask yourself, "Is there any evidence against my thesis?" or "What does an outside source have to say about my thesis?"

The "Posing a New Question" Strategy

When you use the "posing a new question" strategy to write your conclusion, you are inviting the reader to consider a new idea or question that has appeared as a result of your argument.

For example, consider a paper about three versions of the folktale "Rapunzel." This paper argues that German, Italian, and Filipino versions of "Rapunzel" all vary in terms of characterization, plot development, and moral, and as a result have different themes. A "posing a new question" conclusion for this paper might ask the historical and cultural reasons for how three separate cultures developed such similar stories with such different themes.

To use this strategy, ask yourself, "What new question has developed out of my argument?"

The "Addressing Limitations" Strategy

When you use the "addressing limitations" strategy to write your conclusion, you are discussing the possible weaknesses of your argument and, thus, the fallibility of your overall conclusion. This strategy is often useful in concluding papers on scientific studies and experiments.

For example, consider a paper about an apparent correlation between religious belief and support for terrorism. An "addressing limitations" conclusion for this paper might suggest that the apparent correlation relies on the paper's definition of "terrorism" and, since the definition is not objective, the apparent correlation might have been wrongly identified.

To use this strategy, ask yourself, "In what aspects is my argument lacking? Are there circumstances in which my conclusions might be wrong?"

Polishing Your Conclusion—and Your Paper

After you've completed your conclusion, look over what you have written and consider making some small changes to promote clarity and originality:

  • Unless your discipline requires them, remove obvious transitions like "in conclusion," "in summary," and "in result" from your conclusion; they get in the way of the actual substance of your conclusion.
  • Consider taking a strong phrase from your conclusion and using it as the title or subtitle of your paper.

Also, be sure to proofread your conclusion carefully for errors and typos. You should double-check your entire paper for accuracy and correct spelling as well.

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How to Restate A Thesis: Your Detailed Guide

how to restate a thesis

A thesis acts as your research paper’s main pillar, guiding the readers to the key points on the paper and the direction that you took. A thesis statement comes at the introduction, but you will need to restate it in the conclusion. Notably, a lot of students find this challenging and keep asking, “How do you rephrase a thesis statement?” and “Are you supposed to reword your thesis in the conclusion paragraph?”

To help you restate thesis of your paper appropriately, we have highlighted the key steps that you should follow. Make sure to also check the examples and practice the different ways to restate a thesis until you can hack it like a pro.

What Does Restate Thesis Mean?

Before we can look at the steps involved in restating a thesis, it is important to start by asking the questions, “What does restating means?” and “How long does a thesis restate have to be?”

Restating means that you are highlighting something that you had already brought out, in this case, the “thesis of your paper.” Therefore, you are simply reminding the readers about the points that you were trying to put across in the entire paper, but without sounding repetitive. When it comes to length, there is no specific rule on it, but you should try to make it approximately the same length as the original thesis.

When you restate thesis and conclude the paper well, your work will look complete, professional and earn you a better grade.

Restate Thesis Statement: Decide Where to Position It

In most cases, college students restate the thesis at the start of their conclusion. You might also want to place it on a different section of the conclusion, other than the beginning of the conclusion. When teaching students how to restate a thesis in a conclusion, we recommend them to use the method that will make their work look unique.

For example, instead of restating the thesis as the first sentence, consider starting the conclusion with a rhetoric question followed by your restated thesis statement. Here is an example below. “Will we ever appreciate the importance of saving our rainforests? Rainforests act as the largest carbon sinks on the globe, as well as home to thousands of species, and everyone can play a role in their protection.”

Note that since there is no specific formula on how to restate a thesis statement , it is advisable to start by crafting a draft conclusion and then decide where to position it. Actually, you might consider several positions until you get the perfect spot.

How to Rephrase a Thesis: Make It to have a Deeper Impact

By the time a reader gets to the conclusion of your work, it implies that he/she has already read the entire paper and has a clear idea about your stand on the topic. Therefore, you should take advantage of this and rephrase the thesis statement to deliver a deeper level of emotional effect.

One way of driving this deeper emotional impact is addressing the reader directly, and here is an example. If you were working on a paper with a topic, such as cybersecurity for startups, a good way to start restating the thesis might be:

  • “As a startup enterprise owner …”
  • “To strengthen your information security as a small business owner …”

Ways to Restate a Thesis: Answer the Question, “So What?”

The stated thesis at the start of your introduction might not provide the answer to the question, “so what?” However, the restated thesis , in your conclusion, should comprehensively answer the question. The answer seeks to inform the reader about the significance of the arguments in the paper to avoid leaving him/her hanging.

For example, if your paper was talking about teenage alcohol and substance abuse, make sure to answer the question “So what?” by showing what it does to teenagers. This can be something such as this; “ Additional awareness of the dangers of substance abuse, such as alcohol, should be emphasized because teenagers are more prone and likely to give in because of peer pressure rather than the implications of substance abuse.”

Avoid Making Apologies when Rewording a Thesis

When working on the conclusion of your paper, it is prudent to be confident that you provided ample proof in the body. Therefore, as you restate the thesis, you should not make apologetic statements because they undermine your argument. Such statements, which you should avoid, include:

“It appears that …. “ “It is possible that …” “It is my opinion that …”

The only time when using such statements when restating your thesis might be okay is when the topic of discussion was simply a possibility.

Restate Thesis Statement by Varying the Tense

When writing an paper, the thesis statement at the introduction might have been done in the future tense, informing the reader what to anticipate in the rest of the paper.

For example, a paper looking at coal production might have a thesis such as this, “ I will examine the effects of using coal in Azerbaijan ….” When restating the thesis, you can change the tense, and put it in the past, so that it looks something like this, “ I evaluated the how harmful the use of coal is to the environment in Azerbaijan …”

Seek Writing Help to Restate Thesis of Your Paper

When you work on any piece of assignment, how you wrap it up, especially in the conclusion, is very important to avoid leaving your reader in suspense. In this post, we have demonstrated how to restate a thesis statement, but you should consider reading a carefully done restate thesis and practice more to hone your skills. However, if you are still finding the task a challenge, even after reading a restate thesis example, consider seeking writing help from an expert.

We have a pool of qualified writers who are ready to help you with your academic assignments, and all you have to do is ask us for help to “restate my thesis.” They know how to start a paper, write the body professionally, and restate the thesis like pros. Furthermore, our services are cheap, and you can count on our writers for quality work and top grades.

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How to Rephrase a Thesis Statement for the Conclusion

A thesis statement is the most critical part of any essay, research paper, term paper, or academic paper.

Most professors, instructors, or teachers will look forward to reading an engaging thesis statement. Another thing they will also focus on is how you restate the thesis in the conclusion of an essay or research paper.

For every thesis in the introduction, there must be a restated thesis statement at the beginning of the conclusion.

If you are not conversant with how to restate a thesis, you came to the right place because we will look at the steps, tips, and strategies to use so that you keep the spirits of your readers high even as they exit reading your piece of written text.

Restating a Thesis

A thesis restatement comes at the beginning of the conclusion paragraph . Note that when restating the thesis, you are simply rewording, restructuring, reorganizing, and representing the original thesis statement in the introduction within your conclusion.

There are many reasons why many professors and guides for writing various types of papers will insist on having a restated thesis as part of the first section of the conclusion paragraph.

Restating the thesis helps the readers to close the loop of reading your text by seeing how you have proven the thesis in your body paragraphs.

It also helps to bring closure to the readers without leaving them in suspense. You are also reintroducing the central argument, enhancing the perceived significance your readers developed as they started reading.

A restated thesis also makes an excellent transition to other parts of the conclusion, such as a call to action, recommendations, or implications.

Steps for Restating a Thesis in a Conclusion

Understanding the thesis restatement process will go a long way in ensuring you achieve the benefits we have discussed above. You want to paraphrase your thesis so that even though they deliver the same message; they have a different organization, structure, and flow, making your writing persuasive and compelling.

1. Read the original thesis statement

After writing your introduction and body paragraphs, it is expected that you will have refined the preliminary thesis statement into a final thesis statement. Now, when you need to restate the thesis, for the purposes of concluding, begin by reading the final thesis statement of your essay or research paper, whatever writing you are undertaking. Reading the original thesis helps you to identify its focus and have a good picture of how to restate it in the conclusion.

2. Decide where you want to place it

Although many people might think that a restated thesis must appear at the beginning of the conclusion, that is not always the case. Therefore, you have to decide where you will place the restatement. At this stage, having an outline of the conclusion paragraph would be ideal, and it will help you figure out where to restate the thesis without making mistakes. All the same, having the restated thesis at the beginning of the introduction saves you time. Writing a conclusion is not cast in stone; you can take whatever approach you like as long as you achieve the intended purpose.

3. Look at the perspective of the original thesis

To restate the thesis better, consider the original thesis's point of view or perspective. You want to maintain the same person you wrote the thesis and the subject, even if it means rewriting the entire thesis.

4. Focus on the main points in the body paragraph

If you feel lost in how to restate the thesis, outline the main points and keywords you presented in the body paragraphs. An excellent way to quickly do this is by reading each topic sentence of the body paragraphs. Remember, your restatement should have the information you have discussed and portray the links you have established in your paper.

5. Express the significance of your argument

You have to justify your paper's central argument to validate the restated thesis. You should let your readers know why they should care about the topic you are writing about. Expand the thesis, so you have the original contribution without altering the intended meaning.

6. Paraphrase the thesis

Having identified everything that sets you up for successful thesis restatement, ensure that you paraphrase the thesis so that you have a restated thesis that meets all the criteria set in the rubric. Let's look at some ways to make the restated thesis stand out.

How to Rephrase or Paraphrase a thesis Effectively

Restating a thesis is about achieving different wording and flow but maintaining the meaning of the original thesis. This can be achieved in many ways. In a nutshell, you can restate the thesis using synonyms, changing the sentence structure and tenses, shortening or lengthening the thesis, and writing the message by linking it to research. Let's have a detailed look at each of these strategies.

Link your thesis to research

If you are writing a research paper or an essay, you must tie the thesis to the research problem stated in your introduction.

Change the Sentence Structure

You can take advantage of the fact that you can play around with the arrangement of words (syntax) as an inspiration to alter your original thesis statement when restarting it. You can restructure the original thesis into smaller or shorter sentences and then combine them again without altering the meaning you presented earlier in the introduction paragraph. You can rearrange the clauses in a sentence but maintain the same meaning.

Shortening or extrapolating the original thesis

A thesis statement is clear and concise. If your initial thesis statement was shorter, consider having a longer restated thesis at the end of your paper. This is always the case with most restatements. It helps spread out the main arguments or points in the body paragraph so that the readers are reminded about what they just read and how your promise in the thesis statement has been achieved. Summarizing the thesis statement when restating it should be done when focusing on the main idea.

Substitute synonyms

To effectively rephrase, paraphrase, or reword a thesis, you can use synonyms of the words used in your original thesis statement. Take advantage of dictionaries and word thesaurus but ensure that you maintain the same meaning without being ambiguous. Thanks to the richness of English in synonyms that mean the same thing, you will not have a lot of challenges restating a thesis using synonyms.

Change the tense

There is power in the way you can use tenses when restating a thesis statement. In most instances, the thesis statement is written in either present or future tense. You can take advantage of this and write a thesis statement in the past tense, emphasizing the main points you discussed in the body paragraphs.

Tips for Thesis Restatement (what works and what doesn't)

We are in the business of writing custom papers for diverse groups of clients, from students to professionals and scholars. Therefore, we keep trying, researching, and reading more about how to perfect the papers we write. Out of the many essays, theses, proposals, research papers, term papers, and dissertations we have written, we can confidently give the tips below as surefire ways to restate the thesis in the conclusion.

  • Never apologize when restating a thesis. After all, you have fielded the best proof through evidence and examples supporting your claims in the essay. An apology at this point only weakens your conclusion paragraph, leaving your readers confused even more.
  • When writing the thesis statement in the conclusion, acknowledge the counterarguments and counterclaims. Instead of sticking to your main point of view, show maturity by giving credit to either side of an argument.
  • Don't use clich?s when restating the thesis. It is the same thing as using filler words within your body paragraphs; it dilutes the sweetness of your writing.
  • Use conclusion sentence starters to introduce your restatement. You should try as much to avoid the common conclusion starters such as "to sum up, in conclusion, ?etc."
  • You should reword the original thesis and put it effectively within the beginning of your conclusion, even though you can put it anywhere. It is the easiest approach and makes it easy to locate the restated thesis and allows readers to refocus on the research purpose or purpose of the essay.
  • You should be concise while making meaning at the same time.
  • You should be objective, focused, and neutral in your stance . Instead of using judgmental language, stay neutral when rewriting the thesis for your introduction.
  • You can compile the topic sentences in the body paragraphs and enumerate the central claims when restating the thesis.
  • After restating the thesis, you should expound on the significance of your topic . You should logically explain why your readers should care based on the findings. You should call the readers top action and discuss implications and limitations.
  • Don't contradict yourself when writing the thesis a second time, as this leaves your readers confused. You should also avoid introducing new information.
  • Ensure that your restated thesis has a good choice of words and sound flow and does not counter the meaning of the original thesis . Remember, the thesis and restated thesis are sisters only that have different appearances but stand for the same thing.
  • You should view the restated thesis statement as a powerful version of the original thesis that cements your central idea in the readers' minds.
  • Avoid using incorrect tenses and modifiers when restating the thesis. When you use the wrong tenses, you confuse the readers, as when you incorrectly modify the subject.
  • Be confident as you restate the thesis to have a strong conclusion paragraph.

Examples of Original and Restates Thesis Statements

Below are examples of restating a thesis statement to help you figure out how to do it when writing your conclusion paragraph.

What are the components of a strong thesis?

A strong thesis statement should answer the question of "how?" and "why?" about the topic and should do so with specificity. It takes a stance, justifies discussion, and is specific. Therefore, it should have a specific noun, action verb, and assertive predicate. For instance,

Example: The tax policies (specific noun) of the current administration threaten to reduce (action verb) the tax burden on the middle class by sacrificing education and healthcare programs for anyone ( assertive predicate ). These should also feature when you restate the thesis, even if you rephrase, change the structure or tenses, or shorten the original thesis.

What does rephrasing or restating the thesis statement mean?

It means reading the original thesis and expressing it differently but maintaining the original meaning. The restated thesis is placed in the conclusion paragraph, preferably in the begging immediately after the conclusion starter.

Where does the restated thesis go?

When restating the thesis, placing it at the beginning of your conclusion paragraph immediately after the conclusion paragraph starter helps you to avoid losing your readers. It is the most convenient location, although you can place it anywhere within the conclusion. Placing it at the beginning helps you to have a narrow to the broad conclusion that gives better closure to the readers.

How does one restate the thesis?

To restate the thesis statement, read the original thesis statement, then rephrase it by changing the tenses and structure, using synonyms and different vocabulary, shortening or lengthening it, and paraphrasing it but maintaining the original meaning. Avoid using a thesis generator when restating your thesis because it will not give you the correct feel if you did it alone.

how to restate your thesis statement in the conclusion paragraph

Gradecrest is a professional writing service that provides original model papers. We offer personalized services along with research materials for assistance purposes only. All the materials from our website should be used with proper references. See our Terms of Use Page for proper details.

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Learn about the elements of a successful essay conclusion.

The conclusion is a very important part of your essay. Although it is sometimes treated as a roundup of all of the bits that didn’t fit into the paper earlier, it deserves better treatment than that! It's the last thing the reader will see, so it tends to stick in the reader's memory. It's also a great place to remind the reader exactly why your topic is important. A conclusion is more than just "the last paragraph"—it's a working part of the paper. This is the place to push your reader to think about the consequences of your topic for the wider world or for the reader's own life!

A good conclusion should do a few things:

Restate your thesis

Synthesize or summarize your major points

Make the context of your argument clear

Restating Your Thesis

You've already spent time and energy crafting a solid thesis statement for your introduction, and if you've done your job right, your whole paper focuses on that thesis statement. That's why it's so important to address the thesis in your conclusion! Many writers choose to begin the conclusion by restating the thesis, but you can put your thesis into the conclusion anywhere—the first sentence of the paragraph, the last sentence, or in between. Here are a few tips for rephrasing your thesis:

Remind the reader that you've proven this thesis over the course of your paper. For example, if you're arguing that your readers should get their pets from animal shelters rather than pet stores, you might say, "If you were considering that puppy in the pet-shop window, remember that your purchase will support 'puppy mills' instead of rescuing a needy dog, and consider selecting your new friend at your local animal shelter." This example gives the reader not only the thesis of the paper, but a reminder of the most powerful point in the argument!

Revise the thesis statement so that it reflects the relationship you've developed with the reader during the paper. For example, if you've written a paper that targets parents of young children, you can find a way to phrase your thesis to capitalize on that—maybe by beginning your thesis statement with, "As a parent of a young child…"

Don’t repeat your thesis word for word—make sure that your new statement is an independent, fresh sentence!

Summary or Synthesis

This section of the conclusion might come before the thesis statement or after it. Your conclusion should remind the reader of what your paper actually says! The best conclusion will include a synthesis, not just a summary—instead of a mere list of your major points, the best conclusion will draw those points together and relate them to one another so that your reader can apply the information given in the essay. Here are a couple of ways to do that:

Give a list of the major arguments for your thesis (usually, these are the topic sentences of the parts of your essay).

Explain how these parts are connected. For example, in the animal-shelter essay, you might point out that adopting a shelter dog helps more animals because your adoption fee supports the shelter, which makes your choice more socially responsible.

One of the most important functions of the conclusion is to provide context for your argument. Your reader may finish your essay without a problem and understand your argument without understanding why that argument is important. Your introduction might point out the reason your topic matters, but your conclusion should also tackle this questions. Here are some strategies for making your reader see why the topic is important:

Tell the reader what you want him or her to do. Is your essay a call to action? If so, remind the reader of what he/she should do. If not, remember that asking the reader to think a certain way is an action in itself. (In the above examples, the essay asks the reader to adopt a shelter dog—a specific action.)

Explain why this topic is timely or important. For example, the animal-shelter essay might end with a statistic about the number of pets in shelters waiting for adoption.

Remind the readers of why the topic matters to them personally. For example, it doesn’t matter much if you believe in the mission of animal shelters, if you're not planning to get a dog; however, once you're looking for a dog, it is much more important. The conclusion of this essay might say, "Since you’re in the market for a dog, you have a major decision to make: where to get one." This will remind the reader that the argument is personally important!

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How to Restate a Thesis Statement: Examples & Tips

What is the most important part of any essay or research paper? Of course, it’s the thesis statement —a sentence that expresses the paper’s main idea and guides the readers through your arguments.

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But where do you place the thesis? You’ve probably answered, “in the introduction.” However, that’s not all of it—you also need to restate the thesis statement in the conclusion. Moreover, it should be paraphrased using a more diverse vocabulary.

The picture shows the definition of a restated thesis.

If you’re unsure about how to restate a thesis, this article by Custom-Writing.org will be helpful for you. Here, you will find:

  • various rephrasing strategies,
  • a step-by-step guide,
  • the most actionable thesis restatement tips.
  • ✍️ Thesis Restatement Definition
  • ✅ Step-By-Step Guide
  • 💡 Rephrasing Strategies
  • 📋 Example Sentences
  • 🖼️ How to Reframe
  • ✨ Bonus Tips

🔍 References

✍️ what is a restated thesis.

A restated thesis is a reworded and restructured version of the original statement. It is presented in a conclusion or any other part of the essay requiring a recap of the paper’s main idea. It shouldn’t repeat the thesis statement word for word: instead, it’s better to focus on its content.

Why Restating Your Thesis Is Necessary

For a solid, effective academic work, a restated thesis in a conclusion is a must. Here’s why:

  • A restated thesis helps reintroduce your central argument, thus enhancing its perceived significance.
  • A correctly restated main claim makes the transition to the implications smoother.
  • A paraphrased thesis restatement signals the readers about the wrap-up of your paper.

✅ How to Restate a Thesis Step by Step

Now, let’s dwell on the restatement process in more detail. We recommend you follow the steps we described below. It will help you make your paraphrased thesis effective without undermining your persuasive arguments.

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💡 How to Rephrase a Thesis: Different Strategies

You can approach the restatement of thesis in several ways. Here are the best strategies that will make your argument effective and easily understood.

The picture enumerates the 5 best thesis restatement strategies.

How to Restate a Claim by Substituting Synonyms

English is a language rich in synonyms, so you’ll hardly experience any trouble finding suitable substitutes for the words you’ve used in the original thesis. You can also try out an online reword generator or thesis statement maker to get different versions of your central claim.

For instance, imagine that this is your thesis:

People of color have achieved pronounced success in the fight for their civil rights and equality in the USA over the last century,

You may experiment with synonyms as freely as you want. Here are some variants:

  • The 20-century civil rights movement gave many rights and freedoms to the minorities in the United States.
  • The situation with racial equality improved significantly over the past 100 years, giving racial minorities a strong voice in American society.

Restating Your Thesis by Altering the Sentence Structure

The syntax is also a rich source of inspiration for thesis changes. If the original statement is compound, divide it into several shorter sentences. If you’ve used several simple sentences in the first version, consider combining them into one longer statement.

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Here is an example of altering the thesis’ structure without changing the main points:

In the original version, we started by focusing on diabetes. In the reworded thesis, we presented the numbers as the first piece of data. This way, we’re directing the reader’s attention to the gravity of the problem.

How to Restate Your Thesis by Changing the Tense

In most cases, the original thesis statement uses future or present tense. It helps to inform the readers about what they are about to read. For instance, it can start with an introductory phrase:

I will argue that homework should be canceled to give students more free time and ease the burden of high school studies.

In this example, the thesis statement is written in the present tense. It links to the general statistics of time students spend on their homework. You can transform this statement into a past-tense sentence in the conclusion, showing that your argument has been proven.

The presented evidence showed that students benefited from homework cancellation and had more quality time for their hobbies and relaxation.

Restating a Thesis by Shortening or Lengthening It

The length of your thesis statement also matters. You may present it in a shorter way at the beginning of your paper, focusing only on the gist of your research question. Later on, once the arguments are laid out and explained in detail, you can present a more extended version of the initially formulated problem.

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In this restates thesis example, we have extended the original idea, explaining what “assigned seating” and “school bullying” mean. This way, the reworded version could embrace the evidence discussed in the argumentative essay’s body.

Restating a Thesis by Linking It to the Research Problem

The strategy we’re about to describe is suitable for use in research paper writing. You will need to tie the thesis statement to the problem you’ve outlined in the introduction, linking it to the issue you’re examining.

For instance, in an essay on child obesity in the USA, you can restate the thesis as follows:

Although preventive healthcare has witnessed much advancement in the past decade, evidence proves that child obesity is still on the rise, with alarming annual increase rates.

📋 How to Restate a Thesis: Example Sentences

Now, let’s examine how to rephrase a sentence in practice. Have a look at these examples:

Example # 1

Here, we expanded the thesis statement by making it longer and adding some details.

Here, we have changed the sentence structure by switching the first and second parts. The first example focuses on the legalization of marijuana, while the second version starts by mentioning the rising rates of teenage weed consumption.

In this example, we’ve changed the thesis statement’s tense from future to past, showing how an intention transformed into a completed task.

🖼️ How to Reframe a Reworded Thesis?

Once you’ve approached the conclusion paragraph of your work, it’s time to think about reframing your main claim. It’s important not to duplicate the introductory thesis because its role in the final section is different. Here are some workable reframing suggestions:

  • Reword the original thesis and put it at the beginning of your conclusion. It will bring the focus back to your initial research purpose.
  • Enumerate the central claims you’ve focused on. They can be compiled from topic sentences used in the body paragraphs.
  • After restating the thesis, you can dwell on the broader significance of the problem you’ve examined. Make a logically related call to action based on the cited evidence. You can also mention your study’s limitations and clarify what additional research is needed.

✨ Bonus Thesis Statement Tips

Now, it’s time to give you a bonus for careful reading: our tried-and-tested tips for good thesis rewriting. Check them out:

As you can see, rephrasing a thesis statement requires effort. Using extensive vocabulary and syntax will help you restructure the content and retain its meaning. And, of course, make sure to follow our tips!

Further reading:

  • Best Thesis Statement Examples with Expert Comments
  • How to Write a Conclusion for a Research Paper: Examples & Tips
  • How to Write a 5-Paragraph Essay: Outline, Examples, & Writing Steps
  • What Are the 5 Different Types of Essays? A Complete Guide

❓ How to Restate Thesis in Conclusion FAQs

Restatement of your thesis involves restructuring and changing the vocabulary originally used in the introduction. However, the altered thesis should preserve your work’s meaning and central message.

You will typically need a reworded thesis in a conclusion paragraph. This part of your essay or research paper should wrap up everything you’ve said and summarize your claims in different words.

When composing your essay conclusion paragraph, it is vital to reword your thesis statement initially presented in the introduction. This strategy will help you make the conclusion sound non-redundant while preserving the original main idea.

When restating the claim, you do the same work as when you reword the thesis. You need to change the wording and syntax while preserving the overall meaning of the original claim.

A good example is as follows: “children should wear uniforms at school.” The reworded thesis would contain the same meaning rephrased in your own words: “Uniforms are recommended for all students.”

  • Writing the Conclusion: Indiana University Bloomington
  • Writing Introductory and Concluding Paragraphs: University of Minnesota
  • How to Restate a Thesis Statement: Classroom: Synonym
  • Writing a Paper: Conclusions: Walden University
  • Conclusions: Purdue University
  • Ending the Essay: Conclusions: Harvard University
  • Thesis Statements: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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Conclusions

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Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research. The following outline may help you conclude your paper:

In a general way,

  • Restate your topic and why it is important,
  • Restate your thesis/claim,
  • Address opposing viewpoints and explain why readers should align with your position,
  • Call for action or overview future research possibilities.

Remember that once you accomplish these tasks, unless otherwise directed by your instructor, you are finished. Done. Complete. Don't try to bring in new points or end with a whiz bang(!) conclusion or try to solve world hunger in the final sentence of your conclusion. Simplicity is best for a clear, convincing message.

The preacher's maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers:

Tell what you're going to tell them (introduction).

Tell them (body).

Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

Thesis Helpers

how to restate your thesis statement in the conclusion paragraph

Find the best tips and advice to improve your writing. Or, have a top expert write your paper.

Easy-To-Use Guide On How To Restate a Thesis in 2023

how to restate a thesis

So, you have painstakingly written your paper intro, body, and now you are stuck on how to restate a thesis in conclusion. Well, you are not alone, my friend! Many college and university students go through what you are experiencing now.

Nevertheless, do not panic. In this top-tier post, you will see how to restate a thesis statement effortlessly and fantastically. Keep on reading to get your problem solved by the experts today.

What Does Restate Thesis Mean?

For us to have better grounding, we have first to understand what restating means? It denotes stating an idea again or differently, especially more transparently or convincingly.

In most papers, this short part forms the first sentence of the conclusion paragraph. As you state the thesis again in a new way, you help the reader recap the original thesis statement, especially in a long paper.

How Do You Rephrase a Thesis Statement?

There are a plethora of ways to restate a thesis statement. However, a successful thesis restatement ought to remind your readers of what you have proven in your body paragraphs. It should also help to bring your research paper to a successful close.

Below are professional steps to guide you when you are thinking about a thesis restatement:

  • Where do I want to restate my thesis?

The first step is to determine where you’d want to fit your thesis restatement in the conclusion paragraph. Most students think that it is supposed to be the first sentence of the concluding section. However, that is not the case.

You can decide to place it at the beginning, middle, or end of your summarizing paragraph. The goal is to remind your reader of the main idea while still maintain a sense of creativity and high writing standards.

Therefore, you can draft a rough conclusion and identify a suitable place for your thesis restatement before writing the final paper.

  • What have I discussed in the body paragraphs?

By the time you write your conclusion, you have already exhausted everything; the reader needs to know the original thesis statement. Therefore, you have ‘an informed reader’ by the time you are thinking to restate thesis statement.

Why is this important to know?

It helps you draw your thesis restatement from the arguments you’ve raised in the body paragraphs. The restated thesis will, therefore, provide a greater level of sophistication to the original statement.

How To Rephrase a Thesis

It is no secret that paraphrasing as a whole is not an easy task. At this point, after writing your five-paragraph paper, your mind might be saturated, and rephrasing can seem like calculating a calculus equation.

But you can still achieve this task and accurately. Scroll down to see how?

  • The ‘so what’ question

Professionals have unanimously agreed that this is the backbone of any thesis restatement. This question explains the significance of the original idea. When you revisit it in conclusion, it will prompt the reader to see why it was worth his/her time.

For instance, if you have a paper about cheating among students – the ‘so what’ question can address its meaning for the students and instructors. Look at the restate thesis example for this illustration: “Because cheating in exams depends on more than just the copy-pasting, it is crucial that students know about how cheating occurs.”
  • Avoid apologizing

At this point, you have given your defense in more than four body paragraphs; why should you be apologizing now? It will only make your conclusion look weak and write off all the body paragraphs’ strides.

Desist from phrases such as “it seems like or it is possible” when restating your thesis.

However, when the original thesis uses this conditional language, then an exception is made. You should maintain a high level of confidence at all costs, even in such a case. Have faith that you have done justice to your thesis statement.

  • Clichés are a no-go-zone

You all know how tedious and frustrating clichés can be on the part of the reader. Whenever you use words like ‘in conclusion or in summary,’ you will turn off your reader. Who doesn’t know that the last paragraph is a conclusion or summary?

Take a fresh perspective from the norm to make your conclusion paragraph thrilling and exciting. It will also show your maturity level in writing through the original and creative phrases you choose to use.

Rewording a Thesis

Are you supposed to reword your thesis in the conclusion paragraph? The answer is yes! As we have seen hitherto, rewording a thesis statement gives it a new and captivating outlook. Your conclusion will not appear blunt or dull when you re-write the thesis statement word for word.

So how do you achieve this task?

  • By changing the structure

To have a dissimilar thesis statement from the original, you have to alter its language and structure. It also applies to the clauses used in the original thesis.

Use different parts of speech to begin our thesis restatement. For example, if you start the original thesis with a subject, begin the paraphrase with a prepositional phrase. Here is an example of how to do that:

Original thesis: “Students in college and university are fond of copying and cheating.” Thesis restatement: “In many colleges and universities, students copy and cheat in their exams.”
  • Use different words altogether.

Make use of synonyms to the words used in the original thesis. Your word processor’s thesaurus function could be a good starting point. However, ensure that the words you choose bear the same meaning as the original ones.

  • Break the points up

If you had an original thesis with one long sentence, you could split it up in two or three manageable sentences. After doing this, you can spread the sentences across the conclusion paragraph to break the monotony.

  • Consider changing the tense.

Juggling between the present and past tense is a good strategy for rewording a thesis.

For instance, “I will discuss the impacts of exam cheating” to “I explained how deleterious cheating can be to students.”

How Long Does a Thesis Restate Have To Be?

In most cases, the conclusion paragraph accounts for 5-7% of the whole paper . Therefore, you should consider the overall word count of the entire piece first. After doing this, you will take the number of words you intend to use for your introduction and body paragraphs.

Once you determine the difference between these two, you can know the number of words to use for your thesis restatement. Either way, the number of words should not deter you from coming up with a quality thesis restate in conclusion.

Using the tips above guarantees you a top-notch restate of your thesis. If you wish to use cheap expert writing help to restate your thesis, our experienced writers are on standby.

Hit the ‘Order Now’ button and get your paper started!

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How to Restate a Thesis Statement

Nadine smith, 25 jun 2018.

How to Restate a Thesis Statement

An essay introduces a thesis statement, an argument on a particular topic, typically near the end of the introduction, after the writer has explained the issue or subject. An effective essay also restates -- says it again using different words -- the thesis in the conclusion. Repeating the thesis statement at the end of the essay refreshes the writer’s main point for the reader, and using different words helps the essay avoid sounding monotonous.

Explore this article

  • Substitute Synonyms
  • Reorder the Sentence
  • Shorten Thesis Statement
  • Restate Closely Related Ideas

1 Substitute Synonyms

Use a thesaurus to find synonyms for some of the words in your thesis statement. For example, if your original thesis statement read “Hamlet is insane,” you could reword the thesis statement in the conclusion to read “Hamlet is mentally unstable.” Rework phrases to sound differently, such as in the following: “If there is no history of alcoholism in the family, and if it is drunk in moderation, alcohol can have some health benefits,” which can be changed to, “If no one in your family has suffered from alcohol addiction, and if it is consumed moderately, alcohol can benefit your health in some ways.”

2 Reorder the Sentence

Rearrange the clauses in the sentence. You can re-order the sentence, “If there is no history of alcoholism in the family, and if it is drunk in moderation, alcohol can have some health benefits” to, “Alcohol can have some health benefits if there is no history of alcoholism in the family and if it is drunk in moderation.” Both sentences present the same information in different order.

3 Shorten Thesis Statement

Summarize your thesis statement by focusing on the main idea it contains. For example, if your original thesis statement reads, “If there is no history of alcoholism in the family, and if it is drunk in moderation, alcohol can have some health benefits,” consider changing it to, “Under certain conditions, alcohol can have some health benefits.”

4 Restate Closely Related Ideas

A thesis statements is not like the dry scientific title you gave your research paper on fungi. The thesis statement asserts your opinion about an interesting subject that motivated you to do some research. The restatement must be strong and definitive. Start by listing the factors and main ideas involved in your thesis. Use these concepts to restate the main point of your thesis. "Hamlet's paranoia and ghostly encounters indicate periodic bouts of psychoses."

  • 1 Bogazici University Online Writing Lab: The Essay
  • 2 Purdue Online Writing Lab: Introductions, Body Paragraphs, and Conclusions for an Argument Paper
  • 3 University of New England: Conclusion Paragraph
  • 4 Messa Community College: Conclusion Paragraphs

About the Author

Nadine Smith has been writing since 2010. She teaches college writing and ESL courses and has several years experience tutoring all ages in English, ESL and literature. Nadine holds a Master of Arts in English language and literature from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, where she led seminars as a teaching assistant.

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Conclusion Paragraphs

Citation and embed code.

how to restate your thesis statement in the conclusion paragraph

Your conclusion paragraph should logically conclude your essay, just like your concluding sentences logically conclude your body paragraphs. The conclusion paragraph should begin by restating your thesis, and then you should broaden back out to a general topic. End with a closing statement. This paragraph looks like the reverse of your introduction paragraph, going from specific to general.

Conclusion.png

Restate your thesis

The first sentence of your conclusion paragraph should restate your thesis. A restated thesis expresses the same idea, but the words are different. Remember that the meaning of your thesis should not change. Compare the thesis with the restatement below.

Thesis: Exercise is essential because it improves overall physical and mental health. Restated: Due to the mental and physical health benefits of exercise, it is absolutely crucial for our bodies.

You can restate your thesis by

  • changing the order of the phrases
  • using synonyms (e.g., essential > crucial)
  • stating main points direcly instead of implying them (or vice versa)
  • using different word forms (e.g., adjective > noun)

Apply your thesis to general contexts

Connect your thesis back to the general topics you mentioned in your introduction.

Give a closing statement

Your closing statement is very similar to the concluding sentence of a body paragraph except that you will not restate your main idea at the very end of your paper. Your last sentences can be a prediction, suggestion, opinion, or question. 

Exercise 1: Identify effective restated thesis statements

Read the thesis statement. Choose the best restated thesis from the options below.  

Thesis: Apartment complexes should provide quiet study rooms for residents so they can study without distractions.  

  • Study rooms are important for students to study in.  
  • Apartment managers should build quiet places to study for residents.  
  • Now we can see that study rooms are valuable for students who live in apartments.  
  • It is important for apartments to provide their residents with quiet study areas.

Exercise 2: Restate a thesis

On a piece of paper, rewrite each thesis statement as you would at the beginning of a conclusion paragraph.

  • In order for students to manage stress better, they need to prioritize their tasks, eat well, and get enough sleep.
  • Even though Salt Lake City and Madrid may seem similar based on climate, their major religions, language, and food are distinct.
  • Business owners need to make decisions that satisfy employees, customers, and investors.
  • Increasing your vocabulary is easy if you try to notice new words in context, review them often, and use them as much as you can.

Exercise 3: Write a conclusion paragraph

Read the introduction paragraph and then finish writing the conclusion paragraph on a piece of paper.

Prompt: Describe how to write an essay.

Introduction:

         Many writers feel overwhelmed when they write an essay. They are unsure of where to start or how to be successful. However, the process is very basic. There are simple steps that can simplify the process and make writing a good essay possible for anyone. In order to write an impactful essay, it is essential that writers plan, draft, and share their writing.

Exercise 4: Identify types of paragraphs.

Identify whether each paragraph is an introduction, body, or conclusion paragraph.  

1. T ype of paragraph: __________________________  

Touchscreen technology, wireless charging, and a better camera are the best features on the new iPhone. These qualities all encourage customers to consider buying this phone because it is easier to use, more convenient, and more useful than other models. When you start looking for your upgrade, you should ask yourself if your new phone should have these features. The new iPhone does. What are you waiting for? You won’t regret upgrading to the new iPhone.

2. Type of paragraph: __________________________  

A successful restaurant requires many workers, each with specific jobs that help things run smoothly. Cooks in the kitchen skillfully prepare the food. Servers take orders, deliver meals, and ensure the customers are satisfied. The hostess greets the customers as they enter the restaurant and sets the tone for the customer’s experience. All of these people are necessary to make a restaurant successful.  

3. Type of paragraph: __________________________

All year long, the scenery in Utah Valley is amazing. In the winter, the valley is covered with a blanket of snow. In the spring, the trees blossom with flowers. The summer weather beckons hikers to discover the stunning vistas in the canyons. The Rocky Mountains then take on beautiful shades of red, orange, and yellow in the fall. As each season changes, the beauty of the area is evident. While all of the seasons are stunning, the most beautiful season in Utah is the autumn. 

Exercise 5: Analyze an essay

Read one of the following example essays on the following pages to complete this exercise.

  • Label the introduction paragraph, the body paragraphs, and the conclusion paragraph.
  • Circle the hook.
  • What is the general topic of the essay?
  • Underline the thesis.
  • Underline each of the topic sentences.
  • Do each of the topic sentences support the thesis?
  • Does the conclusion paragraph start by restating the thesis?

IMAGES

  1. How To Restate Your Thesis Statement

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  2. How To Restate A Thesis? Uncover The Top 8 Tips

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  3. How to Restate a Thesis in Conclusion: Examples & Thesis Restatement Tips

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  4. Restate Thesis Statement In Conclusion Examples

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  5. How to Restate a Thesis Statement? Complete Guide With Examples

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  6. Restate Thesis Statement In Conclusion Examples

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VIDEO

  1. FAQ: How to write a satisfying conclusion for a reader

  2. HOW TO WRITE RESEARCH/THESIS RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS, SUMMARY, CONCLUSION, & RECOMMENDATION

  3. Mastering the Art of Restating Your Thesis Statement

  4. Thesis Statement || Creative Nonfiction

  5. How Can I Effectively Write a Thesis Statement for a Literary Analysis Essay?

  6. Argument Thesis Statements

COMMENTS

  1. How to Restate a Thesis: 9 Steps (with Pictures)

    Another way to vary the structure is to present your points in a different order. Many thesis statements include three ideas, presented in the order in which they will be discussed in the body paragraphs. When restating, you can list the points in an alternate order. 3. Split the points up.

  2. Writing a Research Paper Conclusion

    Argumentative paper: Restate your thesis and arguments. In an argumentative paper, you will have presented a thesis statement in your introduction, expressing the overall claim your paper argues for. In the conclusion, you should restate the thesis and show how it has been developed through the body of the paper.

  3. How to write an excellent thesis conclusion [with examples]

    A good conclusion will review the key points of the thesis and explain to the reader why the information is relevant, applicable, or related to the world as a whole. Make sure to dedicate enough of your writing time to the conclusion and do not put it off until the very last minute. Organize your papers in one place. Try Paperpile.

  4. How to Restate a Thesis: Various Approaches to Restating Your Thesis

    3.4 Keep it concise. 3.5 Reflect on the essay's journey. 3.6 Emphasize the significance. 3.7 Check for coherence. 3.8 Avoid introducing new ideas. A thesis statement guarantees that your essay will be read, and a paraphrased thesis states that the main points of your essay will be remembered. Students have already heard about the importance ...

  5. Writing Conclusions

    Address the limitations of your argument. The strategy you employ in writing a conclusion for your paper may depend upon a number of factors: The conventions of the discipline in which you are writing. The tone of your paper (whether your paper is analytical, argumentative, explanatory, etc.) Whether your paper is meant to be formal or informal.

  6. How to Restate a Thesis

    Therefore, as you restate the thesis, you should not make apologetic statements because they undermine your argument. Such statements, which you should avoid, include: "It appears that …. "It is possible that …". "It is my opinion that …". The only time when using such statements when restating your thesis might be okay is when ...

  7. Restating a Thesis: Steps, Strategies, and Useful Tips

    3. Look at the perspective of the original thesis. To restate the thesis better, consider the original thesis's point of view or perspective. You want to maintain the same person you wrote the thesis and the subject, even if it means rewriting the entire thesis. 4. Focus on the main points in the body paragraph.

  8. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis. To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis.

  9. Conclusion Paragraphs

    The conclusion paragraph should begin by restating your thesis, and then you should broaden back out to a general topic. End with a closing statement. This paragraph looks like the reverse of your introduction paragraph, going from specific to general. Restate your thesis . The first sentence of your conclusion paragraph should restate your ...

  10. Essay Conclusions

    A good conclusion should do a few things: Restate your thesis. Synthesize or summarize your major points. Make the context of your argument clear. Restating Your Thesis. You've already spent time and energy crafting a solid thesis statement for your introduction, and if you've done your job right, your whole paper focuses on that thesis statement.

  11. How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Conclusion

    Step 2: Summarize and reflect on your research. Step 3: Make future recommendations. Step 4: Emphasize your contributions to your field. Step 5: Wrap up your thesis or dissertation. Full conclusion example. Conclusion checklist. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about conclusion sections.

  12. How to Restate a Thesis Statement: Examples & Tips

    in hardly. more than 1 hour. Let's Start. Step #1. Reread the original thesis statement carefully. Step #2. Determine in which person it is written (1 st, 2 nd, or 3 rd) and preserve that point of view in the rewrite. Step #3. Outline all keywords and main points that should be present in the reworded thesis.

  13. How to Restate a Thesis: Practical Guidelines

    Here are effective steps on how to create an effective restated thesis statement: Step 1. Review your statement. Begin by revisiting your original phrase from the introduction of your argumentative essay. Ensure you understand the main argument or assertion you presented. Step 2.

  14. Conclusions

    Conclusions. Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future ...

  15. Conclusion Paragraphs

    The conclusion paragraph should begin by restating your thesis, and then you should broaden back out to a general topic. End with a closing statement. This paragraph looks like the reverse of your introduction paragraph, going from specific to general. Restate your thesis. The first sentence of your conclusion paragraph should restate your ...

  16. Conclusions

    Your conclusion paragraph should logically conclude your essay, just like your conclusion sentences logically conclude your body paragraphs. The conclusion paragraph should begin by restating your thesis, and then you should broaden back out to a general topic. End with a closing statement. Restate your thesis. The first sentence of your ...

  17. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay (Examples Included!)

    Also read: How to Write a Thesis Statement. 2. Tying together the main points. Tying together all the main points of your essay does not mean simply summarizing them in an arbitrary manner. The key is to link each of your main essay points in a coherent structure. One point should follow the other in a logical format.

  18. How To Restate A Thesis

    The first step is to determine where you'd want to fit your thesis restatement in the conclusion paragraph. Most students think that it is supposed to be the first sentence of the concluding section. However, that is not the case. You can decide to place it at the beginning, middle, or end of your summarizing paragraph.

  19. Q: How to write the conclusion of a thesis or dissertation?

    Here is a format that you could follow while writing the conclusion of your thesis: 1. Restate your thesis statement. Rephrase it so that slightly different from the thesis statement presented in the introduction and does not sound repetitive. 2. Reiterate the key points of your work. To do this, go back to your thesis and extract the topic ...

  20. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Placement of the thesis statement. Step 1: Start with a question. Step 2: Write your initial answer. Step 3: Develop your answer. Step 4: Refine your thesis statement. Types of thesis statements. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

  21. How to Restate a Thesis Statement

    The conclusion of an essay typically entails a rewording of the thesis, a synthesis of your main points, and a concluding opinion supported by the arguments put forth in your essay. Restating the thesis provides another opportunity to explain your opinion and argue your point of view.

  22. How to Restate a Thesis: Basic Steps and Key Strategies

    A thesis statement is like your paper's compass. It guides readers to the main points of your essay and the direction it takes. It's always a smart move to restate your thesis statement in your paper's conclusion. This helps to summarize your arguments in both the introduction and body paragraphs and finally, to conclude your paper ...

  23. Conclusion Paragraphs

    The conclusion paragraph should begin by restating your thesis, and then you should broaden back out to a general topic. End with a closing statement. This paragraph looks like the reverse of your introduction paragraph, going from specific to general. Restate your thesis. The first sentence of your conclusion paragraph should restate your ...

  24. PTE Essay Writing with Template 2024 : u/Pitiful_Employment80

    Body Paragraphs: Divide your body into paragraphs, each focusing on a specific point or argument. ... This shows that you've considered different perspectives but still stand firm in your stance. Conclusion: Summarize your main points and restate your thesis statement. End with a strong closing statement that leaves a lasting impression on the ...