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tamu undergraduate thesis

Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Eccb undergraduate research.

Hands-on research experience is critically important for the future careers of undergraduate students in ecology and conservation biology. ECCB faculty provide a diverse array of undergraduate research opportunities for interested students. Students may also consult their ECCB course instructor. In most cases, students will participate in research and receive course credit (ECCB 491). 

Some faculty may have paid research internship opportunities. Student interested in developing their own research projects under the supervision of an ECCB faculty member may be eligible for an undergraduate research mini-grant. ECCB will advertise the grant opportunities by email to all ECCB faculty and students when funding is available. Eligible students must be enrolled in ECCB 491 under their faculty mentor. Visit the research faculty directory to research ECCB faculty offering undergraduate research opportunities.

Students may also consult the ECCB course instructor. In most cases, students will participate in research and receive course credit (ECCB 491). Some faculty may also have paid research internship opportunities.

If students are interested in developing their own research projects under the supervision of ECCB faculty, ECCB provides undergraduate research mini-grants. A call for undergraduate research grant applications is emailed to all ECCB undergraduate students at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. Eligible students must be enrolled in ECCB 491 under their faculty mentor.

Undergraduate Thesis

Students working on independent undergraduate research under the supervision of an ECCB faculty mentor are eligible to participate in the University’s LAUNCH program. In this program, students work on an undergraduate thesis, typically during the senior year of their studies. Successful completion of an undergraduate thesis will be noted on the student’s diploma. 

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Undergraduate Research

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There are many opportunities for undergraduate students to engage in research during the academic year and the summer. During the academic year, students can enroll in undergraduate independent research courses (CSCE 291 and CSCE 491) with faculty; please see the  departmental guidelines  for enrollment procedures. Also, all students in the computer science and engineering track of the Engineering Honors Program participate in an intensive undergraduate research experience, culminating in an honors thesis. Opportunities for participating in research during the summer: 

  • Undergraduate Summer Research Grants at Texas A&M University
  • CyberHealthGIS
  • Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program

For more undergraduate research opportunities, take a look at this  list of National Science Foundation-funded REU sites in computer science .

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Undergraduate Research

The mission of the Texas A&M University Galveston Campus (TAMUG) Undergraduate Research (UGR) Program is to enhance undergraduate education through the integration of high impact learning experiences and fostering of “…original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline” ( -The Council of Undergraduate Research ) by the undergraduate student.

Who We Are     

The TAMUG Undergraduate Research program values intellectual and creative scholarship and research as a high impact learning experience that will ultimately enhance knowledge through hands-on application and making contributions towards solving ocean-centered “real world” problems that impact marine wildlife and resources, coastal communities, maritime industries and infrastructure.

We help with facilitating undergraduate access to research opportunities both on and off campus. We can help connect a student with a faculty member or find faculty members with a specific expertise. We can provide suggestions for off campus internships and research experiences. We strive to provide continuous support for students during their undergraduate research experience and assist with deadline reminders, scholarship opportunities and any other support that will enhance the student’s success.

Lene Petersen

Lene H. Petersen, PhD Chair of Undergraduate Research  Instructional Assistant Professor of Marine Biology

[email protected] OCSB (Bldg. 3029) Rm. 252 (409) 740-4786

How to Get Started     

You can do undergraduate research either in-person or remotely

This section will provide further information about the benefits of undergraduate research, how to get started and which opportunities you have.  Download the printable “ How to get Started ” and “ Quick facts about UGR ” files. Also see section “ Undergraduate Research Opportunities ”.

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URS Thesis Program     

Closed for URS  Applications for AY2023-2024 – please check back in June, 2024 to apply for the next cycle (2024-2025)

The URS program seeks to involve any eligible undergraduate in the “graduate student” experience by involving them in the academic research and publication process within a scholarly community to produce a thesis. Submissions from individuals or teams writing a joint thesis (max. of 5 students) are welcome.

This program ensures the unified format of undergraduate theses published at Texas A&M University. Undergraduate Research Scholars engage in a two-semester (Fall/Spring) research project conducted under the supervision of a Texas A&M University faculty mentor that culminates in a public presentation and written thesis. Throughout the academic year, students write theses in progression and must meet intermediate submission deadlines. These deadlines are specified in our program timeline and are meant to ensure that theses follow the formatting outlined in the Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis Manual . Please take into consideration our final thesis deadline when planning your projects. All projects and theses must be completed within our program dates.

Upon completion, theses are deposited into the Undergraduate Research Scholars collection in the Texas A&M University Libraries Digital Repository .

Undergraduates who participate in the Undergraduate Research Scholars program will:

  • Experience the complete process of writing a scholarly thesis
  • Learn how to make a public presentation
  • Gain knowledge that didn’t come from a classroom such as teamwork, problem solving, and leadership
  • Improve chances for acceptance into graduate or professional schools, fellowships, and grants
  • Gain a better understanding of graduate school
  • Network with students and faculty

Learn more about the TAMU URS program

Funding Opportunities for Undergraduate Research at TAMUG     

Now accepting UGR Scholarship Applications for Spring 2024 – deadline to apply: January 31st, 2024.

The TAMUG Undergraduate Research program will fund TAMUG full-time enrolled undergraduate students currently engaged in or planning on engaging in high impact learning and research experiences outside of the classroom under the mentorship of TAMUG Faculty.

The purpose of the scholarship is to empower students to engage in research that will enhance academic and professional skills needed for a competitive job market and/or graduate school applications.  

We offer two undergraduate research scholarships: 1)  ACES (Aggies Commit to Excellence Scholar) which is funded by the TAMUG Research Office and 2) LSAMP (Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation) which is funded by NSF and offered to TAMUG students by the TAMUS LSAMP ( https://tamuslsamp.org/about-us/ ) partnership. Students apply for both scholarships via the same application portal (see link below) but can only hold one of the scholarships per semester. ACES is open to students from any scientific discipline whereas LSAMP can only be offered to students doing research projects in the STEM* disciplines.  *STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).

Scholarship awardees will receive a $1,000 scholarship per semester. Scholarships can be held for either 1 or 2 semesters. Scholarship renewal from the Fall to Spring semester will depend on successful recommendation of the faculty mentor and demonstration of appropriate progress (as determined by the TAMUG Undergraduate Research Program). Travel and/or research awards of up to $500 per student are available for conference expenses and research supplies. Only 1 award will be given per student but funds can be carried over from Fall to Spring semesters.

Supported students are strongly encouraged to apply to the TAMU LAUNCH Undergraduate Research Scholars Program running from Fall to Spring every year (please note separate eligibility criteria may apply). Selection of students will be based on meeting the eligibility criteria listed below, the quality of the narrative (both the personal and educational statements), and letter of support from the faculty mentor.

  • Be a Freshman, Sophomore, Junior or Senior
  • Be registered full-time (12 credit hours) within any TAMUG major
  • Have a faculty mentor who will provide guidance, support and research space/supplies (needs to be established at time of application)
  • Intend to graduate from TAMUG
  • Be available to work a minimum of 10 hours/week on the project during the academic year
  • Assist the student in developing a meaningful research project outside of the classroom
  • Provide a high impact learning experience in a research laboratory of field setting
  • Provide laboratory space (field work is also acceptable), equipment and supplies
  • Meet with the student on a regular basis to monitor project progress
  • Assist student in all aspects of the preparation of a poster and oral presentation (i.e., including data analysis and interpretation)
  • Promote student co-authorship on resulting publication(s), as appropriate
  • Gain outside-of-the-classroom marketable skills for graduate school preparation and/or preparation for jobs
  • Participation in high impact learning research activities with the potential towards peer reviewed publications(s)
  • Be part of a strong network of faculty, lab groups, and other undergraduate research participants
  • Before beginning research activities, it is the responsibility of you and your faculty mentor to meet all TAMU Research Compliance Requirements (IRB, IACUC, IBC).
  • It is a requirement that all undergraduate student researchers must complete the CITI RCR training within 60 days from their initial involvement in research activities.
  • All scholarship awardees are required to register for 491 research credits (either 0 or variable credits).
  • All scholarship recipients are required to attend and present their undergraduate research at a national, international or at the TAMUG annual student research symposium.
  • All scholarship recipients are required to submit an end-of semester activity/progress report detailing their accomplishments over the semester (form will be emailed to you)

UGR Scholarship Application

Ways to do Undergraduate Research     

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UGR Opportunities

Undergraduate research faq     .

Yes. Students interested in participating in research through a 491, or the Undergraduate Research Scholars program are eligible to apply for scholarship funding through several scholarship programs available to students. Please visit: Funding Opportunities at TAMUG for more information.

If you are currently a LAUNCH Undergraduate Research Scholar, you have exclusive access to apply for a travel award or poster voucher to fulfill the presentation requirement for the program. Please email [email protected] for more information.

Students can use the Texas A & M University LAUNCH Database of Undergraduate Research Opportunities to search for internal and external funding. Students are also encouraged to talk to members in their colleges and departments for additional opportunities.

There is substantial room for flexibility with research. At TAMUG, research opportunities are open to all undergraduates, and you  do not  have to be an honors student. Research is often a collaborative effort between undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty using an inquiry-based approach to generate new knowledge. As such, undergraduate research qualifies as a “high-impact practice,” providing students an opportunity to integrate, apply, and reflect on their knowledge. Research allows students to take learning beyond the classroom.

Students who participate in undergraduate research gain many skills that they might not otherwise acquire from classroom instruction:

  • Writing, data collection, and analysis
  • Teamwork, problem solving, time management, and effective communication

Undergraduate researchers gain a deeper understanding of their chosen field not only by actively participating in it, but through mentoring relationships with faculty and graduate students.  Undergraduate research helps students clarify career goals by identifying passions and a better perspective on what it means to be a professional the field. As a result, student researchers are more likely to be satisfied with their undergraduate education and continue on to graduate or professional school.  Research experience strengthens applications for graduate and professional schools, business, or industrial positions by expanding technical skills and professional knowledge, improving resumes/CVs, and providing opportunities for strong letters of recommendation.  Finally, it can be a lot of fun. You generate new knowledge, meet interesting people, and undergraduate researchers generate new knowledge, meet interesting people, and they might even get paid for doing it.

Undergraduate research exists in every department at TAMUG in variable capacities. Students are not necessarily required to conduct research in their major department. Check with departmental advisors to verify degree requirements for undergraduate research. Students are encouraged to follow their passion and contact several faculty in their area of interest to explore opportunities.

The office of Research Compliance and Biosafety ( RCB ) is responsible for providing training and support to faculty, students, and staff in regulatory requirements for research. RCB provides administrative and operational support for Texas A&M’s research compliance review committees as well as other research compliance programs designated at the university. Projects may require approval through Research Compliance and Biosafety committees if they involve:

  • Human Subjects: Institutional Review Board (IRB)
  • Vertebrate Animals: Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC)
  • Biohazards: Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC)

Note:  Please be aware that if you are using social media and/or online content, you may be subject to review by the Institutional Review Board (IRB).

There is no “honors thesis,” however, students participating in an honors program can use their Undergraduate Research Scholars (URS) thesis as their capstone experience. The URS thesis is open to any undergraduate student regardless of whether s/he participates in the University Honors Program, or departmental or college honors programs.

Please contact the TAMUG Honors Program Advisor Ms. Barbara Dover ( [email protected] ) for more information.

A capstone is defined as a year-long integrative experience that allows students to combine their career goals, majors, and interests in faculty-mentored independent projects that focus on leadership, research, community service, or teaching. Students in the honors programs can use the LAUNCH Undergraduate Research Scholars ( URS ) thesis program to fulfill their capstone requirement, or apply for a departmental capstone. Students should consult with their departmental and honors advisors to determine additional requirements and/or eligibility for capstone experiences.

Students need to speak to their home departments and/or faculty advisors to open a research section for a 491 course. 491 courses can be 0 credit or variable credit, and may carry either a letter grade or S/U designation. Students should consult the  Office of Financial Aid to determine if registration in a research course affects financial aid packages or any scholarships.

To be eligible, the student must:

  • Apply to the UGR Scholars Program through LAUNCH
  • Be actively involved in an independent undergraduate research project throughout both the fall and spring semesters under the mentorship of a TAMUG Faculty member throughout the academic year
  • Have completed at least 60 credit hours (junior status) of undergraduate course work
  • Have at least 24 credit hours at TAMUG
  • Have and maintain a cumulative GPR of at least 3.0
  • Be expecting to graduate in May of the current academic year, or later

Upon acceptance to the UGR Scholars program students will be expected to:

  • Register for a 491 course (0-4 credit hours)
  • Produce a written undergraduate thesis to be published in the Undergraduate Research Scholars Capstone Collection in the Texas A&M OAKTrust Repository, or in a peer-reviewed journal
  • Attend the Orientation and Thesis Workshop in October
  • Adhere to all thesis deadlines throughout the academic year as set by LAUNCH
  • Make a public presentation at the TAMUG Student Research Symposium or other local or national conference or symposium by the end of the Spring semester
  • Apply through LAUNCH
  • Have at least one semester of faculty-mentored undergraduate research experience
  • Have at least 60 credit hours (24 hours at TAMUG)
  • Have and maintain a GPR of 3.0 or higher
  • Possess outstanding oral communication skills
  • Be able to enthusiastically describe your undergraduate research to a general audience
  • Be willing to serve as a source of information on how to get involved in undergraduate research
  • Provide a letter of support from a Texas A&M faculty mentor

Upon acceptance to program UGR students will be expected to:

  • Participate in an all-day orientation and training in August
  • Attend Ambassador meetings
  • LAUNCH -sponsored events
  • Student consultations
  • Presentations to classes, student organizations, prospective students, parents, and administrators
  • Review, interview, and train the incoming class of Ambassadors

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Honors & Thesis Program

High achieving students in both the Political Science Bachelor of Science (BS) and Bachelor of Art (BA) degree tracks are encouraged to take advantage of honors opportunities in our department and the University at large.

Participation in departmental honors provides students with a number of benefits, including:  

  • Expanded course options, including smaller class sizes and innovative learning approaches
  • Enhanced engagement with faculty through directed or capstone research opportunities
  • Interaction with honors faculty, who will be essential for students needing letters of recommendation or help with applications for graduate, professional, or law school
  • Early registration privileges

To receive departmental honors recognition at graduation, entering students must complete  18 hours of honors coursework  as described below:

  • Exactly 6 hours of 400-level directed research or capstone research with honors credit (481, 485, 491, 497) (no more than 6 will count towards departmental honors).
  • No more than 6 of these credit hours may consist of Political Science graduate courses (600 level) taken for graduate credit.
  • 3 additional hours of honors credit outside the department.
  • At graduation, a student must have a cumulative Texas A&M GPR of at least 3.5 and cumulative Honors GPR of at least 3.25.

Additional departmental honors information is available for more information.

Outside of the department, political science undergraduates are encouraged to explore options in the College, including the  Cornerstone Honors Program  and through the  University LAUNCH office 

Students completing directed research and capstone courses can also consider producing a  written honors thesis,  which can be done in conjunction with the  Undergraduate Research Scholars Program .  Completion of this thesis is highly recommended for students considering graduate studies in political science, public administration, or other related areas.

Interested in the Thesis Program? Find more information online on planning your Political Science Thesis.

During the 2019-2020 academic year, 12 undergraduates in political science completed a URS thesis.  For the most recent list of URS projects from our department visit  OakTrust .

Some of our past URS and honors students are now in successful graduate programs or academic careers at places such as Yale University, Arizona State University, American University, and Texas A&M University.

If you are interested in honors or discussing faculty advising options for a senior thesis, contact the Political Science Undergraduate Advising Office at (979) 845-3127.

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tamu undergraduate thesis

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Undergraduate Research

Each semester, the Department of English offers 5-7 UPREP projects for undergraduate English majors. The Undergraduate Professional and Research Experience Program (UPREP) allows students the opportunity to work alongside a faculty member on a research project outside of the classroom. Student involvement can range from working as an editorial or research assistant to aiding in the preparation for an academic conference. In order to apply, students must be full-time undergraduates majoring in English.

Students who are selected to work on a UPREP project will:

  • serve as a project assistant for a faculty member for up to 100 hours throughout the semester
  • gain invaluable practical experience in an area of interest for future academic or career plans
  • submit an evaluation report of her/his experience at the end of the term
  • have the opportunity to earn academic credit in the form of an ENGL 485 contract
  • receive a $750 stipend at the end of the semester when all duties are completed

In order to apply, please complete the UPREP Application and email to [email protected] or drop off a hard copy of your application to LAAH 352 by the deadline. Students may apply to more than one project, but will need to complete a separate application for each one.

All student applications for Spring 2024 are due on November 20, 2023 by 5:00pm. Students will be notified of a decision by November 27.

Description: This UPREP will introduce an undergraduate student to Open Educational Resources (OER) and to the English 203 libguide, both of which are living documents and require regular attention. For the OER, we will continue to revise and expand chapters in preparation for the Fall 2024 semester.  For the 203 libguide, we will continue to gather data on frequently-used texts in literature classes and ensure that reputable copies of those texts are included, whenever possible according to copyright law, in the libguide.  In addition to work on these existing resources, we will also begin to compile material to expand the “Writing and Research” chapters of the 203 and Sci-Fi OERs into a standalone “Writing about Literature” handbook OER.  Finally, we will also find a professional conference to attend together, the registration (and any additional) fees for which will come out of my UPREP bursary.  Because time is short, we will probably attend a virtual conference, but an in-person conference such as 4Cs should not be ruled out, depending on the student’s availability and interest. We will meet weekly to make plans and discuss progress.

Student Involvement: Student and Dr. Carly-Miles will meet weekly to discuss progress regarding ongoing 203 OER revisions, expansion of the 203 libguide, and initial work on expanding OER "Writing about Literature" chapters into an OER handbook.  Student will assist with compiling a list of texts used in English department syllabi and then either locating viable copies of those texts in the public domain or requesting they be purchased with unrestricted borrow licenses from the library. 

Required Skills & Interest: Interest in reading and writing about literature ; availability to meet weekly.

Benefits to Student & Faculty: Faculty will benefit from assistance in these projects; student will benefit from learning about open education resources and from considering aspects of writing about literature as we work towards creating/compiling a handbook on that subject.  Student will also benefit from attending (either virtually or in person) a professional conference in the spring.

Use of Abbott Funds: Funds will be used for conference registration, travel fees if necessary to travel to conference, and one working lunch for student and faculty at the end of the uprep period.

Comments: Thank you for considering!--Claire

Description: In celebration of Texas A&M University’ designation of the host institution of the New Variorum Shakespeare (NVS) and in continued commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the publication of Shakespeare’s First Folio, the Department of English (along with the Glasscock-supported Early Modern Studies Working Group and the Center of Digital Humanities Research) is planning a one-day symposium in the spring of 2024 that will focus on the histories and futures of textual editing of Shakespeare. This symposium will bring together leading scholars in the fields of digital humanities, Shakespeare studies, and textual editing, and it will be open to the A&M community and to the public. Dr. Todd is working alongside many English Department faculty, staff, and graduate students on several initiatives related to the New Variorum Shakespeare and the Spring 2024 Symposium, and the UPREP student would work closely with Dr. Todd in planning and promoting the Spring 2024 Symposium.

Student Involvement: The UPREP student will work on webpage updates for the Spring 2024 Symposium, flyer design and distribution, symposium logistics, and event planning.  Ideally, the student will be able to provide in-person assistance at the Symposium (scheduled for April 26, 2024).

Required Skills & Interest: Familiarity with the Google Suite, especially Sheets, is desirable. Student should have an interest in Digital Humanities, Shakespeare, Textual Editing, event planning, and/or professional networking.  Student should be detail-oriented, should follow with tasks in a timely fashion, and should demonstrate strong communication skills.

Benefits to Student & Faculty: The student will gain valuable experience in event planning and professional networking.  The student will also learn about the exciting fields of digital humanities, textual editing, and Shakespeare studies. The benefit to the faculty will be additional time to devote to the planning and implementation of the initiatives involving the NVS, including the Spring 2024 symposium.

Use of Abbott Funds: N/A

Description: The project involves identifying primary texts and conducting textual analysis (production histories, critical responses, interviews, etc.) on feature-length films and any accompanying written literatures from which they were adapted focused on sci-fi and sci-fi horror cinema narratives with portrayals of childhood and adolescence through AI representation; a foundation in the classics (Shelley's Frankenstein and more) serves as the literary base for the project. From family films like D.A.R.Y.L. (1985) to the horror movie M3GAN (2023) - with a sequel already planned - goals for the research include: an investigation of audience in the niche genre (story content, ratings systems); formation of a critical, theoretical approach to the films' analysis; construction of a historical timeline for the development of the films; interviews with writers, directors, and/or actors of the texts; and the creation of original written content to document research findings. The result of the research - as a physical deliverable - will be an academic text to propose to a credible and applicable publishing house to contribute to genre studies in film, specifically within science fiction and horror studies.

Student Involvement: The selected student will work with me to locate all relevant film narratives and their associated connections (possible original texts in novel, comic book, or short fiction forms) to establish and document the breadth of the market. They will help locate secondary research written about the narratives and possible contacts for interviews regarding the films. Involvement will also include reviewing monograph content for editing, proofing, and  co-writing contributions. Other general research practices (organizing materials, communication with each other via email/Zoom, bi-weekly update meetings, etc.) would be included as standard protocol.

Required Skills & Interest: The selected student should have an interest in genre studies, particularly science fiction and/or sci-fi horror, but they are not required to have any specific expertise in the subject matter. Basic research methodologies (using online databases, conducting personal interviews, performing Internet searches, etc.) are required.

Benefits to Student & Faculty: The efforts of the student assistant yield benefits that include: acquiring and/or enhancing research skills, learning the academic publication process for monographs, and earning editing/writing credits on completed publication toward the building of their professional curriculum vitae. I would benefit from the assistance in locating materials for the project, creating an archive of the texts, chronicling previous research on the subject matter, and having a second reader for editing and proofing.

Use of Abbott Funds: n/a

Description: Visual literatures represent a broad field of study including comic books, manga, the graphic novel, television, film, games, and social media. Each of these fields of art and entertainment provides readers and audiences narratives as engaging, in-depth, and didactic as classic written literature (poetry, short fiction, and novella/novel); however, visual literatures are often misunderstood in complement to their written counterparts. The goal of this project is to continue the development of a visual OER textbook that can be utilized for English courses and beyond in which the study and analysis of literature expands into visual spaces ranging from the comic book to the feature-length film (e.g., Barbarella comics created by Jean-Claude Forest in the early 1960s to Roger Vadim’s film of the same title in the late 1960s). As much as we ask what we learn from reading George Eliot or James Baldwin in classic and modern written literature, we can afford the same study to Satoshi Kon’s Perfect Blue (1997), Yvette Lee Bowser’s Living Single (1993-1998), or even the GTA (Grand Theft Auto) story mode. Considerations for visual literatures have already been addressed in English Department OERs created for ENGL 104, ENGL 203, and our new Sci-Fi/Fantasy OER; this textbook will provide an in-depth exploration of visual literatures, starting with a concentration on film and television, one of the more common and wide-reaching spaces of visual storytelling.

Student Involvement: The student researcher will work with the instructor on: organizing the OER into relevant chapters for development; researching critical theory and criticism to include in the textbook; locating relevant film and television narratives to reference for chapter development; reviewing previous OER materials to revise and incorporate into the new textbook; creating sample writings for instructor and student access; and contributing original writing about the OER subject matter. Other general research practices (organization of materials, communication with each other via email, Zoom, and in-person meetings) will be included as standard protocol.

Required Skills & Interest: The selected student should have an interest in visual media studies, particularly film and television, but they are not required to have any specific expertise in the field. Basic research methodologies (using online databases, performing Internet searches, etc.) are required.

Benefits to Student & Faculty: The selected student will benefit from: acquiring and/or enhancing research skills, learning the academic process for OER creation, and earning editing/writing credits on the completed publication toward the building of their professional curriculum vitae. I would benefit from the assistance in locating materials for the project, organizing content, chronicling previous research on the subject matter, and having a second reader for editing and proofing.

Description : The prospective UPREP student would help with promoting and advertising creative writing events, speakers, clubs, and other relevant activities.

Student Involvement: The student would help use social media and other strategies for connecting with the A&M community to help inform students, staff, and faculty about creative writing at A&M, especially activities organized by the English Department and assist the Creative Writing Coordinator (Jason Harris0

Required Skills & Interest: Effective English communication and social media tools familiarity  and interest in creative writing

Benefits to Student & Faculty: The UPREP student's contribution will help increase attendance and participation from students and overall student, faculty, and staff awareness of the English Department's creative writing impact at A&M.

Use of Abbott funds: To help fund any software or hardware devices that might assist the UPREP student with the promotion and advertising of creative writing activities, speakers, and events.

Description: The New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare (NVS), which began with the publication of Romeo and Juliet in 1871, is now published open-access in digital form, beginning with two editions, The Winter’s Tale and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The digital NVS has been designed with three main goals in mind: 1) to teach students and early career researchers the concepts behind variorum editing through interface design as well as tutorials; 2) to enable searching across and within volumes and variants using Modern English and major Act-Scene-Line numbers; and 3) to be interoperable with, and allow access to, other major Shakespeare digital resources including bibliographies of criticism, digital copies of editions published since Shakespeare’s time, images, and videos (set for third-phase development). Following the practice of state-of-the-art digital humanities projects, we aim to render Shakespeare’s texts and international criticism available world-wide.

Student Involvement: The student researcher will work closely with me, the associate digital editors, and NVS volume editors to create and publish NVS volumes online at: https://newvariorumshakespeare.org/.  They will have their choice of working on different aspects of the digital editing process, including locating relevant historical editions of Shakespeare plays for individual NVS volumes, OCRing and transcribing editions for collation, XML-encoding physical volumes for online publication, testing and providing feedback for the backend editing tools, assisting in creating documentation for training and workflow, and helping editors and the NVS backend developer think through the process of transforming physical editions into digital texts. Depending on their interests, they can choose what they would like to focus on for this project. 

Required Skills & Interest: The student researcher should have an interest in either Shakespeare or DH—preferably both. Previous experience with XML and/or Gitlab is desired, but not required. Project-specific training will be provided. 

Benefits to Student & Faculty: This project will benefit the student researcher by enhancing their research skills and enabling them to learn about both traditional editing techniques and methods in Shakespeare Studies and the newer digital editing and publishing practices. They will receive credit on our website’s Contributors page and their participation in this international project will help them build their professional CVs. Their efforts will help this project advance into the next phase more quickly, which we believe will greatly contribute to our recruiting efforts for the NVS project PI/tenure-track early modern hire as well as the early modern transformational hire this year.  

Use of Abbott Funds: If possible, we would like to apply Abbot funds to secure copies--or just images--of any Shakespeare edition that may not be freely available through our library, interlibrary loan, or online. We are now tracking down editions for the process of collation.

Comments: Thank you for considering our application.

Description: I would like to have a UPREP to assist me this coming spring in the preparation of a monograph manuscript that is part of one of the new CAS merger grants, “The hidden science of Richard Waller: Artistic representations of science in the early decades of the Royal Society of London.”  During this semester, I and my co-author, Dr. Lawrence Griffing (Biology) will be doing the annotations on Waller’s long manuscript poem describing how the material world came into being, a re-telling of the Genesis story without referencing the Bible but through the lens of seventeenth-century science mixed with classical mythology. We also will be drafting the introduction, focusing on the context of popular versions of the Genesis story and attempts to create a historical timeline for creation as well as the writings of early scientists on fossils and related natural phenomenon. 

Student Involvement: The UPREP would be meeting with me to work on the annotations--who better than a sharp undergraduate to let you know where a gloss is needed and if it is clear?-- and also to help track down other late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century accounts of the formation of the natural world to be used in the introduction.  

Required Skills & Interest: A student with an interest in the development of early scientific writing and thought would          find this a rewarding project, as would any student interested in how early modern manuscript materials are edited and become print texts.  Attention to detail, enthusiasm for using online databases, and willingness to learn basic seventeenth-century handwriting styles would be welcome. 

Benefits to Student & Faculty: Students would get hands on experience in how a scholarly publication comes to life as well as having an opportunity if they desired to develop an independent project 485 on Restoration science and scientists or Biblical narratives in the context of the new science. 

Use of Abbott Funds: not applying for as I have Lindsey funds

Description : Jean Ingelow (1820-1897) was a British poet and fiction writer, including Mopsa the Fairy, a novella for children. Ingelow's work won both popular and critical acclaim; she was considered a formidable rival to women poets such as Christina Rossetti, to whom she was frequently compared, and her American readers (unsuccessfully) petitioned Queen Victoria to name Ingelow as the first female laureate.  Despite her fame and influence, there is little reliable biographical scholarship on Ingelow,  and her letters --  the single most important resource for understanding her life, work, and impact -- have yet to be gathered and published.  By collecting, transcribing, and annotating Ingelow's 200+ letters, this project will allow scholars to gain a more accurate understanding of Ingelow's career and international connections.  

Student Involvement: The student will work with digital images of Ingelow's handwritten letters, helping to transcribe them and to research people, events, and other details mentioned within them.  The student might also help with additional editorial tasks such as creating and updating a list of correspondents. The student would be welcome to design a 485 (not sure this would be a good 484 project but I would be willing to consider it). 

Required Skills & Interest: Attention to detail; familiarity with the Google Docs Editors suite; interest in digital humanities and working with primary sources; interest in publishing history and biographical scholarship.  Students should have some familiarity with 19th century British and/or American literature and history.  

Benefits to Student & Faculty: Student benefits:  strengthen and widen research skills through work with primary sources;  gain experience with scholarly editing and digital humanities platforms. Faculty benefits:  assistance with editorial and research tasks

Use of Abbott funds: Purchase software, possible travel to the Humanities Research Center at UT-Austin;  purchase of high quality images of manuscripts; possible purchase of software for text encoding or other research tasks. 

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Nuclear Engineering & Science Center

Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station

Dissertation/Thesis Papers

  • Al Smadi, Eman Haitham Mohammad (2020). Design and Optimization of of the Components of an Accelerator Driven Thorium-Fueled Molten Salt Loop Using MCNP6/SERPENT2 Monte Carlo Methods. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eman-Alsmadi-2/publication/343700182
  • Lou, Jijie (2020). Implementation of Finite-Element-With-Discontiguous-Support Multigroup Method. Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/191753 .
  • O’Dwyer, Rory V (2020). Radiation Hardness Assessment for Muon System Electronics Installed in the 2020 CMS Upgrade. Undergraduate Research Scholars Program, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/175438 .
  • Marcantel, Grace Ann (2018). Analysis of Neutron Environments in Advanced Reactors Vs. Triga Reactor for In-Core Behavior Studies. Master’s thesis, Texas A & M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173485 .
  • Tsorxe, Innocent Y (2017). Baseline Measurements of Natural Radioactivity at the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service- Disaster City. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161346 .
  • Vinjamuri, Anita (2017). Evaluation of Novel Projectiles and Their Impact on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Undergraduate Research Scholars Program. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/164536 .
  • Booth, Ashley Lane (2016). Radioresistance of Mosquitos Exposed to Continuous Sub-Lethal Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Master’s thesis, Texas A & M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156928 .
  • Cochran, Lainy Dromgoole (2016). Preliminary Dose Assessment for Emergency Response Exercise at Disaster City Using Unsealed Radioactive Contamination. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157876 .
  • Gonzalez, Yesenia Amanda (2016). Deconvoluting an Americium-Beryllium Neutron Spectrum from a Proton Recoil Detector. Master’s thesis, Texas A & M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/158958 .
  • Saskatchewan, Soffit (2016). A Neutron Measurement System Design for Pulsed Triga Reactor Experiment at Texas A&M University. Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://www.proquest.com/docview/2502147582
  • Tompkins, James Brandon (2016). Experimentally Validated Neutron Flux Simulation for TRIGA Large Irradiation Cell. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/157834 .
  • Gordon, William (2015). Analysis of Microphonic Noise Genesis and Mitigation in a Boron Carbide Detector System. Master’s thesis, Texas A & M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/155401 .
  • Chance, Christopher (2014). Partial Core Blockage Simulation Using COBRA-TF. Master’s thesis, Texas A & M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153903 .
  • Uhlemeyer, James Richard (2013). Contour Collimation Systems to be Used for Murine Irradiation. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/149423 .
  • Zheng, Weixiong (2013). Physics-based Uncertainty Quantification for ZrHx Thermal Scattering Law. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/151945 .
  • Bean, Malcolm (2011). Computational Neutronics Analysis of TRIGA Reactors During Power Pulsing. Undergraduate Research Scholars Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Available electronically from http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/76931
  • Chen, Y. (2010). Delayed neutron emission measurements for U-235 and Pu-239 . (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A & M University). Available electronically from https://core.ac.uk/reader/147131770
  • Inyang, Otu Effiong (2010). Development of a Prompt-gamma, Neutron-activation Analysis Facility at the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University.
  • Parham, N. A. (2010). Development of Real-time Fuel Management Capability at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University).
  • Heinrich, Aaron David (2008). Delayed neutrons from the neutron irradiation of ²³⁵U. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/85943 .
  • Kar, Adwitiya (2007). Novel 124 Production and Recovery System. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/147133239.pdf
  • Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira (2007). Microdosimetric studies using a Filtered Fast Neutron Irradiation System of research reactor to application in radiation biology; Estudos microdosimetricos usando um Sistema de Irradiacao de Neutrons Rapidos filtrados de reator de pesquisa para a aplicacao em radiobiologia (Doctoral dissertation, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)).
  • Candalino, Robert Wilcox (2006). Engineering analysis of low enriched uranium fuel using improved zirconium hydride cross sections. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4347 .
  • Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath (2005). Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3752 .
  • Jang, Si Young (2004). Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor. (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University). Available electronically from https://www.proquest.com/docview/305076111 .
  • Jung, Jae Won (2003). 142pr glass seeds for the brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University. Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/5738 .
  • Jiltchenkov, Dmitri Victorovich (2002). The development of a remote monitoring system for the Nuclear Science Center reactor. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2002-THESIS-J57002 -THESIS -J57 .
  • Hearnsberger, David Wayne (2001). Fission neutron/gamma irradiation of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2001-THESIS-H42 .
  • Drees, Lawrence David (1999). Using mixed integer programming to schedule experiments on the Texas A&M University nuclear science center reactor. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1999-THESIS-D74 .
  • Comfort, Christopher M. (1998). Delayed neutron energy spectrum measurements of actinide waste isotopes. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1998-THESIS-C658 .
  • Baca, Bernadette Doris (1997). Establishment and testing of a whole body counter for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1997-THESIS-B33 -B33 .
  • Charlton, William (1997). Delayed neutron measurements from fast fission of actinide waste isotopes. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1997-THESIS-C4427
  • Chen, Cien-Hsiang (1997). Development of SunMan: A graphically driven steady state neutronic and thermal-hydraulic model of the Nuclear Science Center Reactor at Texas A&M University (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University). Available electronically from https://www.proquest.com/docview/304404852 .
  • Hearne, David Douglass (1997). Technetium production: a feasibility study for Texas A&M University nuclear science center. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1997-THESIS-H43 .
  • Bigler, Mark Andrew (1996). Neutronic evaluation of LEU 30-20 fuel for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net /1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1996-THESIS-B52 .
  • Brightwell, Michael Shane (1995). Minimizing the production of unwanted activation products in the AR40/AR39 dating method. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1995-THESIS-B746 .
  • Johns, Russell Craig (1995). Enhancement of two-phase flow images obtained using dynamic neutron radiography. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1995-THESIS-J632ESIS -J632 .
  • Rearden, Bradley Thomas (1995). Engineering analysis of a power upgrade for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1995-THESIS-R436ESIS -R436 .
  • Belian, Anthony Paul (1994). Measured and calculated activities of spallation products formed in copper and gold foils as a result of bombardment with 120 MeV deuterons. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1994-THESIS-B431 .
  • Bennett, Tami Norene (1994). Flow Visualization of Molten Alloys using Real-Time Neutron Radiography. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/301301899
  • Carlisle, Bruce Scott (1994). An evaluation of the neutron radiography facility at the Nuclear Science Center for dynamic imaging of two-phase hydrogenous fluids. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1994-THESIS-C283 .
  • Krohn, John Leslie (1992). Development and application of a prompt gamma activation analysis system in the measurement of neutron capture cross-sections of geologic materials (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University). Available electronically from https://www.proquest.com/docview/304026750
  • Davis, John Wesley (1988). Two-dimensional neutronic analysis of the TAMU Nuclear Science Center Reactor using transport and diffusion theory based codes. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1988-THESIS-D261 .
  • Van Gent, Daniel Lee (1980). Rare-Earth Soil Horizon Markers to Determine the Short-Term Accretion in Louisiana Marshes. Master’s thesis, Louisiana State University. Available electronically from https://www.lsu.edu/physics/research/medical-health/1988-MS-Daniel_Van_Gent.pdf
  • Yupari, Ricardo (1985). Three dimensional neutronics calculations for the TAMU Nuclear Science Center Triga reactor using BOLD VENTURE. Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University. Available electronically from https://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1985-THESIS-Y96 .
  • Usiak, Kenneth Rudolf (1981). The Effects of Welding Fumes on Students. (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University). Available electronically from https://www.proquest.com/docview/303199261

Texas A&M University Catalogs

Undergraduate catalog.

The Texas A&M University Undergraduate Catalog, published annually, provides information about the undergraduate programs of Texas A&M University to students, prospective students, and faculty and staff of the University. Included is information concerning requirements for admission, services available to students, course offerings and listings of the administrative officers.

Publication Statement

The Texas A&M University Undergraduate Catalog is published each spring and the provisions for this volume are applicable during the 2023-2024 academic year.  A student who registers for the first time at the University during a summer session is subject to the degree requirements set forth in the catalog effective for the fall semester immediately following his or her initial enrollment.

Texas A&M University Undergraduate Catalog, Edition 146, is published online by the Office of the Registrar, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-0200.

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  1. Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis Program

    The Undergraduate Research Scholars (URS) thesis program seeks to provide eligible undergraduates with a graduate student experience by allowing them to participate in research and communicate their findings as principal authors to the University's scholarly community.

  2. Thesis

    What is an embargo? What is OAKTrust? What is the URS Thesis Manual & Policy Guide? When is my thesis published in OAKTrust? Where do I submit required documents for the URS Thesis? Who approves my URS project? Howdy! Welcome to LAUNCH: Thesis. Learn more about Texas A&M University at www.tamu.edu.

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    Scholars Thesis Submittal System (STSS) 2023-2024 Undergraduate Research Scholars (URS) Program Application - Part 2 Application Deadline: September 11, 2023 at 11:59 AM CT Part 2 Revision Deadlines Vary by Student: Consult Your Proposal Reviewer Student Instructions

  4. Theses & Dissertations

    DART-Europe E-theses Portal Access to thousands of open access research theses from universities in European countries. DiVA Academic Archive On-line Theses from 30 universities and colleges of higher education from Sweden and other Scandinavian universities. (In English, Swedish, and Norwegian).

  5. Thesis Application

    Eligible students can apply to the Undergraduate Research Scholars (URS) thesis program each year between June and September. The URS application consists of two parts: Part 1: Intent to Apply Part 2: Completed application template submitted to the Scholars Thesis Submittal System (STSS) that includes: Proposal Research compliance acknowledgement

  6. PDF Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis Manual and Policy Guide

    The title of "Undergraduate Research Scholar" is a stand-alone honors distinction awarded to students who meet the requirements presented in this Thesis Manual & Policy Guide. Undergraduate Research Scholars are required to describe the results of their faculty -mentored research and scholarly work in a

  7. PDF Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis Formatting Guide

    Instructions concerning the Undergraduate Research Scholars honors distinction and the preparation of undergraduate research theses at Texas A&M University 2023-2024 LAUNCH: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Page | ii TABLE OF CONTENTS

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  9. Program Schedule

    Faculty & Staff / / Undergraduate Research / Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis Program / Program Schedule Program Schedule 2023-2024 Undergraduate Research Scholars Program Schedule Note: Events after the application deadline are open to students accepted into the URS thesis program.

  10. TAMU Undergraduate Research Scholars (URS) Program

    Experience the complete process of writing a scholarly thesis Learn how to make a public presentation Gain knowledge that didn't come from a classroom such as teamwork, problem solving, and leadership Improve chances for acceptance into graduate or professional schools, fellowships, and grants

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    LAUNCH: Undergraduate Research promotes, coordinates, creates, and assesses undergraduate programs involving creative scholarship, inquiry, and research in all academic disciplines at Texas A&M.

  12. Undergraduate Research

    In this program, students work on an undergraduate thesis, typically during the senior year of their studies. Successful completion of an undergraduate thesis will be noted on the student's diploma. We offer real-world scientific investigation opportunities through the department's 10-week, grant-based REU summer research program.

  13. Undergraduate Research

    Undergraduate Research. There are many opportunities for undergraduate students to engage in research during the academic year and the summer. During the academic year, students can enroll in undergraduate independent research courses (CSCE 291 and CSCE 491) with faculty; please see the departmental guidelines for enrollment procedures.

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    This program ensures the unified format of undergraduate theses published at Texas A&M University. Undergraduate Research Scholars engage in a two-semester (Fall/Spring) research project conducted under the supervision of a Texas A&M University faculty mentor that culminates in a public presentation and written thesis.

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    By LAUNCH: Undergraduate Research, Unit of Undergraduate Studies, Texas A&M University. COLLEGE STATION, Feb. 11, 2021 - On Wednesday, February 24, 2021, LAUNCH: Undergraduate Research will kick off the fourth annual Undergraduate Research Scholars Symposium. This year the event will be virtual and hosted on the ForagerOne-Symposium platform.

  16. Undergraduate Research Scholars

    Undergraduate Research Scholars. The Undergraduate Research Scholars (URS) thesis program seeks to provide eligible undergraduates with a graduate student experience by allowing them to participate in research and communicate their findings as principal authors to the University's scholarly community. This program is only open for Qatar Aggies.

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    Students completing directed research and capstone courses can also consider producing a written honors thesis, which can be done in conjunction with the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program. Completion of this thesis is highly recommended for students considering graduate studies in political science, public administration, or other related ...

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    In the ACC, members develop a thesis by partaking in research and writing a scholarly essay, similar to the standard thesis process. What makes the ACC unique is the creative artifact—it's a long-term project students create that ranges from short films to non-fiction writing, poetry collections and more.

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    The Dissertation Article and Thesis Assistance (DATA) program is a semester-long program designed to support graduate students working on a thesis, dissertation, or article for publication. Undergraduates working on an undergraduate thesis are also welcome to apply. When you participate in DATA, you attend weekly meetings with the same writing ...

  20. Undergraduate Research

    Undergraduate Research. Each semester, the Department of English offers 5-7 UPREP projects for undergraduate English majors. The Undergraduate Professional and Research Experience Program (UPREP) allows students the opportunity to work alongside a faculty member on a research project outside of the classroom. Student involvement can range from ...

  21. Dissertation/Thesis Papers

    Dissertation/Thesis Papers Al Smadi, Eman Haitham Mohammad (2020). Design and Optimization of of the Components of an Accelerator Driven Thorium-Fueled Molten Salt Loop Using MCNP6/SERPENT2 Monte Carlo Methods. Master's thesis, Texas A&M University.

  22. PDF Undergraduate Research Scholars Thesis Formattingguide

    Instructions concerning the Undergraduate Research Scholars honors distinction and the preparation of undergraduate research theses at Texas A&M University 2022-2023 LAUNCH: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Page | ii TABLE OF CONTENTS

  23. Undergraduate Catalog < Texas A&M Catalogs < Texas A&M University

    The Texas A&M University Undergraduate Catalog is published each spring and the provisions for this volume are applicable during the 2023-2024 academic year. A student who registers for the first time at the University during a summer session is subject to the degree requirements set forth in the catalog effective for the fall semester ...