PhD Program

The marketing program offers two broad areas of research:  consumer behavior and quantitative marketing.

In the consumer behavior track, students are exposed to the fundamentals of psychology (cognitive psychology, social psychology, and behavioral decision theory) and experimental research and on how to use them to address marketing problems, such as consumer judgment and decision making and the role of the multiple variables influencing this process (e.g., attitudes, emotions, motivation, individual differences, perception, social influence, etc).

In the quantitative marketing track, students are exposed to the fundamentals of economics (microeconomics, industrial organization, econometrics, etc.) and how to use them to address marketing problems such as mathematical modeling of buyer-seller interactions, consumer choice processes, the allocation of marketing resources into components of the marketing mix, and product development.

Alternatively, students may focus on the interplay between these two broad areas (consumer behavior and quantitative marketing) and how the economics and psychology interface can help researchers better understand and predict marketing phenomena.

Program Overview

In order to cope with these expanding horizons, the program is designed to provide broad exposure to the advanced literature in each field. The program includes a series of marketing PhD seminars, the development of expertise in a particular social science discipline (economics and/or psychology), and technical skills appropriate to the analysis of the problems to be studied. Students select an area for intensive study and develop a program that trains them to comprehend and perform cutting-edge research in that field.

Consumer Behavior Curriculum

Quantitative Marketing Curriculum

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Marketing, PhD

The Wharton doctoral program offers students an unmatched interdisciplinary environment within which to generate creative ideas and hypotheses and to develop the analytic skills to evaluate them.

Faculty members are active in diverse research areas that connect to initiatives and centers both within Wharton more broadly, and other departments within the university.

For more information: https://marketing.wharton.upenn.edu/program-requirements/

For more information about the Joint Doctoral Degree in Marketing and Psychology :  https://marketing.wharton.upenn.edu/joint-doctoral-degree-in-marketing-and-psychology/

View the University’s Academic Rules for PhD Programs .

Required Courses 

The Ph.D. program in Marketing is based on the completion of the dissertation as well as a minimum of 15 graduate level course units.

The degree and major requirements displayed are intended as a guide for students entering in the Fall of 2023 and later. Students should consult with their academic program regarding final certifications and requirements for graduation.

Sample Sequence Quantitative Track*

The exact sequence can vary from student to student. For example, students may select different economics and statistics sequences to best meet their personal needs. 

MKTG 9550 and MKTG 9570 are offered every other year. Students should take them when offered.

Sample Sequence Consumer Behavior Track*

The exact sequence can vary from student to student. For example, students may select different economics and statistics sequences to best meet their personal needs.

MKTG 9510 and MKTG 9530 are offered every other year. Students should take them when offered.  

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Program Requirements

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Below please find the program requirements for a students in Marketing . Doctoral students in Marketing generally complete the program in five years.

A minimum of 13 semester courses at doctoral level are required. Each semester students will consult with the Marketing faculty coordinators to receive approval of their course selections.

Students in the Marketing program choose one of the following sequences

Microeconomics

  • Microeconomic Theory I (HBS 4010/Economics 2020a)
  • Microeconomic Theory II (HBS 4011/Economics 2020b)
  • Social Behavior in Organizations: Research Seminar (Psychology 2630)
  • Advanced Social Psychology (Psychology 2500)

Students must take four research methods courses, including at least one course in research design.

Research methods courses that meet this requirement include, but are not limited to:

Quantitative Research Methods

Research Methods Courses

  • Introduction to Econometrics (Economics 1123)
  • Introduction to Applied Econometrics (Economics 2120); (prerequisite Economics 2110; the pre-req will count towards 4 course requirement)
  • Econometric Methods II (Economics 2115)
  • Advanced Applied Econometrics (Economics 2144)
  • Industrial Organization (Economics 2610)
  • Statistical Methods for Evaluating Causal Effects (Econ 1127)
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods II (KSG API 210i)
  • Machine Learning and Big Data Analytics (HKS API 222)
  • Statsitical Machine Learning (Statistics 195)
  • Probability Theory (Statistics 210)
  • Statistical Inference (Statistics 211)
  • Bayesian Data Analysis (Statistics 220)
  • Incomplete Multivariate Data (Statistics 232)
  • Sequential Decision Making (Statistics 234)
  • Advanced Demand Modeling (MIT 1.205)
  • Advanced Natural Language Processing (MIT 6.864)
  • Bayesian Modeling Inference (MIT 6.435)
  • Inference Causal Parameters (MIT 14.388)

Quantitative Research Design Courses

  • Advanced Quantitative Research Methodology (Gov 2001)
  • Program Evaluation: Estimating Program Effectiveness with Empirical Analysis (HKS API-208)

Consumer Behavior

  • Intermediate Statistical Analysis in Psychology (Psychology 1950)
  • Multivariate Analysis in Psychology (Psychology 1952)

Research Design Courses

  • Design of Field Research Methods (HBS 4070)
  • Experimental Methods (HBS 4435)
  • Field Experiments (HBS 4430)

Marketing students are required to take five additional doctoral courses.

Quantitative-track students are required to complete:

  • Consumer Behavior (HBS 4630)
  • Marketing Models (HBS 4660)
  • Two breadth courses
  • Three elective doctoral courses

Consumer Behavior-track students are required to complete:

  • Micro Topics in Organizational Behavior (HBS 4882)
  • Behavioral Approaches to Decision Making and Negotiation (HBS 4420)
  • One elective doctoral course

All students without an MBA degree are required to complete two case-based HBS MBA courses.

Students are strongly encouraged to attend and participate in seminars throughout their program. Students are expected to attend the Marketing Unit Seminars .

Good Academic Standing

To remain in good academic standing, doctoral students are expected to maintain a B grade point average.

Teaching Requirement

Students are required to complete a teaching engagement of one full academic term that includes at least 8 hours, or 3 class sessions, of front-of-class teaching experience and at least 16 hours of teaching preparation time.

Special Field Exam

Students are required to pass the Special Field Exam at the end of the second year or beginning of the third year. This exam has two parts: a written exam and an oral exam based on a research paper a student has written.

Dissertation Proposal

By the end of their third year, all students are required to obtain approval of their dissertation proposal by their Dissertation Chair.

Oral Examination

Students are required to complete a dissertation proposal oral examination. In evaluating the student’s performance at the orals, the Dissertation Committee will take into account the quality of the student’s oral presentation, the quality of the student’s responses to questions from the Dissertation Committee, and the written material prepared prior to the oral date.

Dissertation

Students are required to write a dissertation, which typically takes the form of three publishable papers, to the satisfaction of their Dissertation Committee. The dissertation defense is oral and open to the public.

before you go

Help us keep in touch — it won’t take long, marketing: curriculum, curriculum - marketing phd.

The Marketing PhD curriculum is very flexible in order to meet students’ needs. Each student, in conjunction with the marketing faculty, develops a program of coursework that best addresses the training required for that student’s interests, given the courses available and the student’s prior academic background.

PhD Curriculum

The marketing area offers several PhD Seminars:

  • BA961: Seminar in Quantitative Research in Marketing
  • BA962: Seminar in Consumer Behavior
  • BA963: Marketing Models Seminar
  • BA964: Experimental Design and Analysis Seminar
  • BA965: Automaticity
  • BA966: Social Cognition
  • BA991: Selected Topics (recent special topics seminars have included Consumer Research, Marketing Strategy, and Research Methods)

Each student is expected to take the basic seminar in consumer behavior, marketing strategy, and quantitative marketing.  Depending upon their interests, they would also take relevant courses in other areas at the Fuqua School (e.g., decision sciences, management and organizations, operations management) or other departments at Duke or the University of North Carolina (e.g., economics, psychology, statistics, sociology).  Each student takes methodology courses appropriate to their area of interest. Because the coursework is tailored to your individual interests, there isn’t a ‘typical’ program in the Marketing PhD program.  Here are two potential paths you might take:

  • Seminar in Consumer Behavior
  • Research Methods
  • Selected Topics in Consumer Research
  • Courses in psychology, management and organizations
  • Courses in research methodology
  • Seminar in Quantitative Research in Marketing
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Special Topics in Consumer Research
  • Additional courses in psychology, management and organizations
  • Additional courses in research methodology
  • Courses in economics (theory and econometrics), statistics, decision sciences, or operations management. 
  • Marketing Models Seminar
  • Additional courses in economics, statistics, decision sciences, or operations management

Students may also take some courses in their third year.  Such courses would typically be ones that are relevant to the student’s particular research interests or courses that were not offered every year that they did not take earlier.

Program Guidelines

Below we discuss guidance for course selection and other matters, progress guidelines, and research assistantships. Because the mechanisms for carrying out these functions differ somewhat depending upon the student’s year in the program, the first year, second year and third year are addressed in separate sections.

Advice and Guidance

The major mechanism for providing advice and guidance regarding course selection, first-year paper, research and teaching assistantships, and other matters is a first-year academic advisor system. Each student will be assigned two academic advisors before the beginning of the first year. These advisors will contact the student following admission and will continue to interact with the student regarding questions and information prior to the student’s arrival at Duke. These advisors may or may not be the same individuals to whom you are assigned as an RA/TA.

One of the major roles of the advisors during the first year is to assist with course selection, because the program calls for developing a program consistent with, and tailored to, each student’s background and goals. The advisors assist the student in selecting both Fall and Spring courses for the first year and Fall semester courses for the second year. The advisors also provide guidance to the student regarding involvement in research and teaching assistantships and other matters as appropriate throughout the first year. Finally, the advisors provide an important source of information for feedback to the student and for the first-year paper, as described in more detail next.

Throughout the PhD program, students are expected to take full advantage of faculty expertise and the intellectual environment at the Fuqua School. During the first year, students should meet with faculty members one-on-one to learn about different faculty members’ research projects. All students are also expected to attend all the seminars in the marketing workshop/seminar series, and this will be true throughout your time in the PhD program. These seminars are a central feature of intellectual life here. If you have a class that conflicts with seminar, please let your advisors know. Seminar speakers’ schedules typically include a meeting with PhD students; students are expected to take advantage of these opportunities to interact with visiting scholars.

Progress Guidelines

An important part of any doctoral program is a mechanism for assuring that students receive timely and accurate feedback on their progress in the program. Although course grades and informal conversations with faculty members provide some of this information, more formal procedures ensure that each student has the benefit of as much feedback as possible about his or her performance. The procedures used by the marketing area in the first year are outlined below.

The marketing area faculty will gather information about each student’s first year performance Sources of information will include the student’s advisors, instructors, and faculty for whom he/she has been research or teaching assistant. In addition, the student will provide an annual report discussing first year accomplishments, shortcomings, areas of interest, and how the student would like to be positioned. The student will also submit a one to two-page proposal for the first-year paper. The annual report and the first-year paper proposal should be submitted to the marketing area’s PhD coordinator by May 15. Under the graduate school requirements, a separate report also needs to be submitted to the director of Fuqua PhD program by April 15. Students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade point average of “B” (3.00) or better by the end of the first year and throughout the rest of the program. Any student who receives an “F” or fails to exceed or meet a cumulative “B” average by the end of the first year will be subject to dismissal. In assessing performance, incompletes in coursework will not be viewed positively.

An important component of the first year is the first-year paper. This paper is due to the marketing area PhD coordinator on or before the first day of the Fall semester of the second year. Failure to hand in the paper by this date may result in a recommendation for dismissal of the student. The student’s first-year advisors must approve the paper before it can be submitted. The paper should represent the student’s best work at this stage of the doctoral program. The paper may be a reworked paper handed in for a seminar or a new paper done over the summer. It may be empirical, theoretical, or a review. The important point is that it represents work that the student feels best demonstrates his or her capabilities at that point in time. Collaboration with the faculty is allowed with two stipulations: 1) the student should have played a major role in the generation and development of the core idea and 2) the student should do the writing of the first-year paper. The student should provide a statement describing faculty help on the project and the faculty involved should provide statements about their role and the student’s role.

During the Fall semester of the second year, the marketing area faculty will examine the first-year paper, the student’s annual report, grades, and feedback from faculty who have had the student in class and/or have had the student as a research or teaching assistant. The marketing area faculty will provide feedback to the student. If progress is not satisfactory, performance may be assessed again at a time determined by the area faculty. Poor performance may ultimately result in dismissal from the program.

Research and Teaching Assistantships

A critical part of the doctoral program is forming relationships with faculty members and learning about research and teaching processes. To encourage the early formation of such relationships, the marketing doctoral program requires that each student engage in an average of at least ten hours per week of research and teaching assistantship activities throughout the first year. Payment for these ten hours is guaranteed and part of the student’s stipend in the first year. In general, the student will be assigned to specific faculty who are responsible for providing work associated with these hours. The student’s advisors will also provide advice and guidance to help the student become engaged in activities that match their needs and interests with those of the faculty.

Advice and Guidelines

At the beginning of the second year, each student will find one or two marketing faculty willing to serve as their academic advisor(s) and inform the marketing area PhD coordinator about this relationship. As in the first year, academic advisors will guide the student on all academic issues. In addition, by October 1 of the second year, each student will form a second-year paper committee made up of four faculty members willing to serve on the committee, with one faculty member designated as its chair. The student must notify the marketing area PhD coordinator in writing regarding the membership of this committee. As the second-year paper is used to meet the formal preliminary examination requirement of the Graduate School, this committee will also serve as the preliminary exam committee.

All students are also expected to attend all the seminars in the marketing workshop/seminar series, and this will be true throughout your time in the PhD program. These seminars are a central feature of intellectual life here. If you have a class that conflicts with seminar, please let your advisors know. Seminar speakers’ schedules typically include a meeting with PhD students; students are expected to take advantage of these opportunities to interact with visiting scholars.

As in the first year, the student will submit an annual report by May 15 along with a one or two-page proposal for the second-year paper. Under the graduate school requirements, a separate report also needs to be submitted to the director of Fuqua PhD program by April 15.

During the second year, students should begin planning and implementing their second-year research paper, which must be completed and presented orally to the faculty. This paper is due to the marketing area PhD coordinator as well as the second-year paper committee on or before the first day of the Fall semester of the third year. The research paper should be a written piece of original research, such as an empirical paper (e.g., based on experiments, surveys, secondary data, or scanner data) or an analytical or other quantitative model. The research may be done jointly with faculty; in fact, joint work with faculty is strongly encouraged. However, the student must have made clear and significant contributions to all phases of the project. The aim is to have a paper which is potentially submittable to a proceedings or journal.

During the Fall semester of the third year, the marketing area faculty will examine the second-year paper, the student’s annual report, grades, and feedback from faculty who have had the student in class and/or have had the student as a research or teaching assistant. Depending upon the level of performance, remedial action or dismissal may be recommended. It is possible that at this stage the student may be advised to seek a terminal master’s degree. If progress is satisfactory, the student orally presents the second-year paper to the preliminary exam committee and the area faculty.

Teaching and Research Assistantships

Throughout the second year, the student should continue to be involved in research and teaching assistantships at a recommended level of at least 10 hours per week, on average. Six of these hours are associated with the student’s stipend. The remaining hours need to come from the individual faculty’s research budget. Consequently, it is incumbent on the student to provide enough value to justify the support of the individual faculty member.

At the beginning of the third year, each student finds one or two marketing faculty willing to serve as academic advisor(s) and inform the marketing area PhD coordinator about it. As in the first two years, academic advisors will guide the student on all academic issues. The advisors will approve the topic and scope of a comprehensive review paper (major area paper, or MAP). The comprehensive review paper will be similar to a paper in Psychological Bulletin or Journal of Economics Literature . The purpose of the paper is to explore an area that the student thinks may be the focus of her/his dissertation.  In particular, the paper should review the area of interest, point out gaps in current research, and present ideas for research that would fill those gaps.  The paper will be due by the first day of classes in fall semester of the fourth year. However, earlier completion of the paper is strongly encouraged.

After the MAP has been successfully completed, the student forms a dissertation committee and begins formulating a dissertation proposal. The student should notify the marketing area PhD coordinator in writing when they form their dissertation committee.  The committee must have at least four members, at least one of whom must be from a non-marketing department (e.g., psychology, economics, another area at Fuqua or another business school; someone from marketing at another business school would not meet this requirement). At least three of the members must be from Fuqua.  The student will choose a chair or two co-chairs for the dissertation from this committee. The formal steps include selecting the dissertation committee, which could be the committee chosen for the preliminary exam or updated to reflect the research focus of the dissertation, informing the graduate school about that committee, writing a dissertation proposal, defending that proposal, carrying out the dissertation research, filing an intent to graduate form online, defending the dissertation, and filing the completed dissertation. 

The student should continue to be involved in research and teaching assistantships at a recommended level of at least 10 hours per week, on average. Only six of these hours are part of the student’s stipend; the others are paid via time cards submitted by the student to the faculty with whom they are working. All students are also expected to attend all the seminars in the marketing workshop/seminar series, and this will be true throughout your time in the PhD program. These seminars are a central feature of intellectual life here. If you have a class that conflicts with seminar, please let your advisors know.

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Marketing PhD Program

Marketing is an interdisciplinary field that examines the interactions of consumers and businesses in the marketplace. Academic research in marketing draws upon theories and methodology from a wide variety of fields, including psychology, sociology, mathematics, statistics, and economics. Faculty members in Marshall’s marketing department represent numerous theoretical backgrounds and substantive interests. As mentors, they encourage students to identify their own interests and develop the analytic and methodological skills to pursue their own research questions.

Marketing PhD Program

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  • ADMISSIONS EVENTS

CONCENTRATIONS

Quantitative marketing.

This area of marketing shares theories and methodologies with economics, mathematics, and statistics. Faculty advising students in this area are experts in a variety of topics such as

  • Applications of artificial intelligence in marketing
  • Understanding how businesses manage social interactions
  • The impact of digital platforms on different industries
  • Social networks and network structures in markets
  • Strategic pricing decisions
  • Distribution-channel strategies
  • Innovation and product growth
  • Global markets

Consumer Psychology

This area of marketing shares theories and methodologies with social and cognitive psychology and behavioral economics. Faculty advising students in this area are experts in a variety of topics such as

  • Status and luxury goods
  • Branding and consumers’ attachments to brands
  • Consumers’ strategies to maintain a positive self-evaluations
  • Emotions and their effects on consumers’ valuations of products
  • How the use of technology affects consumers’ enjoyment and memories of experiences
  • Consumers' responses to service and product failure
  • Budgeting and saving decisions
  • Consumer Creativity

Developing Marketing Scholars

The aim of the PhD program in marketing at USC is to develop outstanding researchers and prepare them for productive careers in academia. During their studies, students will transition from consumers of knowledge to producers and disseminators of knowledge.

Marshall’s PhD program in marketing is highly selective. The small size of the program allows for close collaborations between students and faculty and for students to tailor their program of study to fit their background and research interests.

From the beginning of the program, students have the opportunity to engage in different research projects and receive guidance and mentorship from faculty experts. Students are strongly encouraged to develop their own research program and have the freedom to pursue their own ideas.

Faculty members are experts in their areas and are highly committed to the training and guidance of PhD students.

Faculty Coordinator: Gülden Ülkümen, Professor of Marketing

REQUIREMENTS

During their first two years in the program, students are required to complete a series of classes in marketing as well as in other departments in Marshall and USC at large.

Within marketing, PhD students complete four marketing seminars (two in quantitative marketing and strategy, two in consumer behavior). These seminars cover the key areas of academic marketing research and provide students a broad perspective of the field of marketing.

Fall Semester — Even Years

MKT 613: Marketing Models in Consumer and Business-to-Business Markets

Spring Semester - Odd Years

MKT 616: Consumer Behavior Theory and Research

Fall Semester - Odd Years

MKT 615 Strategic and Marketing Mix Models

Spring Semester - Even Years

MKT 618: Consumer Behavior and Decision Making

In addition, students take classes in other departments in the business school (e.g., Management and Organizational Behavior, Data Science), as well as in departments across campus (e.g., economics, psychology, statistics, computer science).

First Year Summer Research Paper

The first year paper allows students to develop their own research interest and to demonstrate their research potential. Students develop an original research question and provide initial tests of their predictions. A faculty mentor and other marketing faculty form the first year research paper committee that guides the student’s process.

Qualifying Exam

Following the spring semester of their second year, students will take part in a qualifying exam that leads to the assessment of whether the student is ready for ascension to candidacy. The topics pursued in the qualifying exam often evolve into a substantial portion of the student’s dissertation. A faculty mentor and other faculty members from marketing and from outside the department form the qualifying exam committee that guides the student’s process.

After passing the qualifying exam, students are admitted to PhD candidacy and pursue their research, culminating in their dissertation.

Research Mentorship

Students work with different research mentors over the course of the program. In the first two years, students work with different faculty member each semester, in order to expose students to different researchers and research approaches. By the end of year two, students should have identified a primary research mentor who will guide them until completion of the dissertation, i.e., their faculty advisor.

Year 1: In year 1, the research mentor aims to advise the student with their courses, studies, and overall strategies in the program. Students may assist with a faculty research project if it offers a good learning experience and does not interfere with classes and other program requirements. In some cases, the relationship may involve the student working on their own research project, in which case the research mentor serves as an advisor. Further, the research mentor may be involved in guiding the development of the first-year paper.

Year 2: In year 2, the student should gain further research skills by assisting the faculty mentor with a research project that offers a good learning experience. Activities may include data collection, data cleaning, data organizing, coding, and estimation for empirical projects, and checking models and proofs for theoretical projects. In some cases, the relationship may involve the student working on their own research project, in which case the research mentor serves as an advisor. Further, the research mentor advises the student in developing the second-year paper.

Year 3: In year 3, the student will continue to gain research skills by working on research projects from previous years that should involve different faculty. If not yet done, the student will start developing their own research projects and agenda. The research mentor will primarily serve as an advisor.

Year 4: In year 4, the student will continue to improve their research skills, advancing research projects from previous years, and start new ones. The research mentor will continue to serve as an advisor.

Year 5: In year 5, the research mentor serves to advise the student on completion of the dissertation. In most cases, the advisor will serve as the student’s dissertation chair.

You will work hands-on in a thriving research culture with constant exposure to new and important ideas. Marshall is ranked 5th in the world in research for the years 2018–2022 by the UT-Dallas Research Rankings.

Our faculty regularly publish in the field’s top journals, such as:

  • Journal of Marketing
  • Journal of Marketing Research
  • Journal of Consumer Research
  • Marketing Science
  • Management Science

Our faculty also continuously publish in the premiere journals of related disciplines

  • American Economic Review
  • Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
  • Journal of experimental Psychology: General
  • Psychological Science
  • The Rand Journal of Economics

Selective List of Journal Publications With Students

From the very beginning of the program, students collaborate with faculty on research projects with the goal of producing research that will be published in the top journals. Below, please find a selection of recent articles that resulted from these collaborations. * denote current or former PhD students.

Ceylan*, Gizem, Kristin Diehl, and Wendy Wood (forthcoming), “To Imagine or Not to Imagine: A Meta-Analysis Investigating the Effectiveness of Mental Simulation of Positive Experiences on Behavior,” Journal of Marketing .

Ceylan*, Gizem, Kristin Diehl, and Davide Proserpio (forthcoming), “Words Meet Photos: When and Why Visual Content Increases Review Helpfulness,” Journal of Marketing Research .

Chandrasekaran*, Deepa, Gerard J. Tellis and Gareth James (2022), “Leapfrogging, Cannibalization, and Survival during Disruptive Technological Change: The Critical Role of Rate of Disengagement,” Journal of Marketing.

D’Angelo*, Jennifer K., Kristin Diehl, and Lisa A. Cavanaugh. "Lead by Example? Custom-Made Examples Created by Close Others Lead Consumers to Make Dissimilar Choices." Journal of Consumer Research 46, no. 4 (2019): 750-773.

Donovan*, Leigh Anne and Priester, Joseph (2020). Exploring the psychological processes that underlie interpersonal forgiveness: Replication and extension of the model of motivated interpersonal forgiveness. Frontiers in Psychology.

Donovan*, Leigh Anne Novak, and Joseph R. Priester. "Exploring the psychological processes underlying interpersonal forgiveness: The superiority of motivated reasoning over empathy." Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 71 (2017): 16-30.

Dukes, Anthony and Yi Zhu* (2019) “Why Customer Service Frustrates Consumers: Exploiting Hassel Costs by a Tiered Customer Service Organization,” Marketing Science, 38(3): 500-515.

Hong*, Jihoon, Max Wei and Gerard J. Tellis (2022), “Machine Learning for Creativity: How Similarity Networks Can Identify Successful Projects in Crowdfunding,” Journal of Marketing .

Jayarajan*, Dinakar, S. Siddarth, and Jorge Silva-Risso. "Cannibalization vs. competition: An empirical study of the impact of product durability on automobile demand." International Journal of Research in Marketing 35, no. 4 (2018): 641-660.

Paulson*, Courtney, Lan Luo, and Gareth M. James. "Efficient large-scale internet media selection optimization for online display advertising." Journal of Marketing Research 55, no. 4 (2018): 489-506.

Pei*, Amy, and Dina Mayzlin (2021), "Influencing the Influencers." Marketing Science, forthcoming.

Proserpio, Davide, Isamar Troncoso*, and Francesca Valsesia* (2021) "Does gender matter? The effect of management responses on reviewing behavior." Marketing Science, Forthcoming.

Gerard J. Tellis, Ashish Sood, Nitish Sood, Sajeev Nair* (2023), “Lockdown Without Loss? A Natural Experiment of Net Payoffs from to Covid COVID-19,” Journal of Public Policy and Marketing .

Troncoso*, Isamar and Lan Luo (2023), “Look the Part? The Role of Profile Pictures in Online Labor Marketplace,” Marketing Science .

Valsesia*, Francesca and Kristin Diehl (2022), “Let Me Show You What I Did Versus What I Have: Sharing Experiential Versus Material Purchases Alters Authenticity and Liking of Social Media Users,” Journal of Consumer Research¸ Volume 49, October, p. 430-449.

Tellis, Gerard J., Deborah J. MacInnis, Seshadri Tirunillai*, and Yanwei Zhang*. "What drives virality (sharing) of online digital content? The critical role of information, emotion, and brand prominence." Journal of Marketing 83, no. 4 (2019): 1-20.

Valsesia*, Francesca, Kristin Diehl, and Joseph C. Nunes (2017), “Based on a True Story: Making People Believe the Unbelievable,” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 71, 105-110

Valsesia*, Francesca, Joseph C. Nunes, and Andrea Ordanini (2021), “I Am Not Talking to You: Partitioning an Audience in an Attempt to Solve the Self-Promotion Dilemma,” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 165, 76-89.

Valsesia*, Francesca, Davide Proserpio, and Joseph C. Nunes. "The Positive Effect of Not Following Others on Social Media." Journal of Marketing Research (2020): 0022243720915467.

Xu*, Zibin, Yi Zhu and Shantanu Dutta (Forthcoming), “Platform Screening Strategies And The Role of Niche Sellers on Service Provision”, International Journal of Research in Marketing

Xu*, Zibin and Anthony Dukes, (2021) “Personalization, Customer Data Aggregation, and the Role of List Price,” Management Science, forthcoming.

Xu*, Zibin, and Anthony Dukes. "Product line design under preference uncertainty using aggregate consumer data." Marketing Science 38, no. 4 (2019): 669-689.

Zhang*, Mengxia and Lan Luo (2023), “Can Consumer Posted Photos Serve as a Leading Indicator of Restaurant Survival? Evidence from Yelp,” Management Science , Vol. 69, No. 1, 25–50

Zhu*, Yi and Anthony Dukes (2017), “Prominent Attributes under Limited Attention,” Marketing Science, 36(5): 683-698.

Faculty Honors

The research of our faculty has been recognized repeatedly as innovative and highly impactful. Faculty members have been named fellows in the field’s leading professional organizations.

  • American Marketing Association IO Lifetime Achievement Award
  • Vijay Mahajan Lifetime Contribution to Marketing Strategy Award
  • Alpha Kappa Psi Award
  • Harold H. Maynard Award
  • William F. O’Dell Award
  • Donald R. Lehmann Award
  • John D.C. Little Award
  • INFORMS Society for Marketing Science Long-term Impact Award
  • Fellow of INFORMS Society for Marketing Science
  • Fellow of American Marketing Association
  • Fellow of Association of Consumer Research
  • Fellow of Society of Consumer Psychology

Proven Thought Leaders

Our faculty have a substantial role in shaping the discipline through their positions as editors, associate editors and editorial board members of:

  • Journal of Consumer Psychology

Our faculty also include former presidents of major professional organizations, such as the Association for Consumer Research, the Association for Consumer Psychology, and INFORMS Society of Marketing Science (ISMS).

Program Culture

The culture of the program is research focused, collegial, supportive, and highly interactive. PhD students are “junior colleagues” encouraged to participate in academic research with faculty from the very beginning. The low PhD student/faculty ratio coupled with the marketing faculty’s “open door” policy promotes frequent and meaningful interactions between faculty and students about research, careers and teaching. Students also serve as colleagues and mentors to each other and often develop papers together.

Research Environment Faculty and students attend weekly scholarly presentations from invited faculty from around the world. In addition internal brown bag seminars and reading groups allow students and faculty to exchange ideas and receive feedback on research topics.

Student Background Our students come from all of over the world. They have strong academic backgrounds and bring with them a variety of experiences prior to joining the program.

Awards Marketing Ph.D. students have contributed to the field by publishing in leading journals and winning numerous prestigious research awards, including the SCP Sheth Award and the William O’Dell Award for long term contributions to marketing for articles published in the Journal of Marketing Research. Students have been recipients of INFORMS Society for Marketing Science (ISMS) Doctoral Dissertation Competition Award, finalists for the John D. Little Award for best paper in Marketing Science, and early career achievement award in marketing. Student research proposals have been funded by the Marketing Science Institute (MSI) and the Institute for The Study of Business Markets (ISBM).

PHD STUDENTS

Stephan (steve) carney.

  • PhD Student in Marketing

Maansi Dalmia

Aparna jayaram, soohyun kim.

Our PhD graduates contribute to marketing research and practice throughout the world. We have a long history of mentoring PhD students who are on the faculty of top universities around the world.

Recent Placements (2023-2019)

Elisa Solinas (2023) Assistant Professor, IE, Spain

Wensi Zhang (2023) Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Dallas, USA

Gizem Ceylan (2022) Postdoctoral Researcher, Yale University

Ilya Lukibanov (2022) Data Scientist, AXS, USA

Sajeev Nair (2022) Assistant Professor, University of Kansas, USA

Isamar Troncoso (2022) Assistant Professor, Harvard Business School, USA

Chaumanix Dutton (2021) Assistant Professor, Arizona State University, USA

Jihoon Hong (2021) Assistant Professor, Arizona State University, USA

Mengxia Zhang (2021) Assistant Professor, Ivey Business School, Western University, Canada

Jennifer D'Angelo (2020) Assistant Professor, TCU, USA

Amy Pei (2020) Assistant Professor, Northeastern University, USA

Yao Yao (2019) Assistant Professor, San Diego State University, USA

APPLYING TO THE PhD PROGRAM

Dates + deadlines.

December 15, 2023: Application Deadline - Accounting, Data Sciences & Operations, and Management & Organization* 

January 15, 2024: Application Deadline - Finance & Business Economics and Marketing 

The link to the PhD Program application is available on the Admissions page and the next opportunity to apply is for Fall 2024 admission. Late applications may or may not be considered at the discretion of the admissions committee. 

Admissions decisions are made from mid-February to mid-April. You will be notified by email when a decision has been made.

ADMISSIONS CONTACT

Ph.D. Program USC Marshall School of Business 3670 Trousdale Parkway, BRI 306 Los Angeles, California 90089-0809 EMAIL

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PhD in Marketing

  • Joint Program in Financial Economics
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Develop your research skills in consumer behavior or economics/quantitative methods and prepare for a career at a leading research institution.

Our Marketing PhD Program gives you a strong theoretical foundation and builds your empirical skills.

You’ll have the flexibility to explore marketing through Chicago Booth while taking courses across the university in psychology , sociology , economics , computer science , and statistics . You’ll also have access to computer science courses at Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago (TTIC) .

The doctoral program defines marketing broadly as the study of the interface between firms, competitors, and consumers. This includes but is not limited to consumer preferences, consumer demand and decision-making, strategic interaction of firms, pricing, promotion, targeting, product design/positioning, and channel issues.

Our Distinguished Marketing Faculty

Chicago Booth’s marketing faculty serve as advisors, mentors, and collaborators to doctoral students.

Daniel Bartels

Daniel Bartels

Professor of Marketing

Pradeep Chintagunta

Pradeep K. Chintagunta

Joseph T. and Bernice S. Lewis Distinguished Service Professor of Marketing

Giovanni Compiani

Giovanni Compiani

Assistant Professor of Marketing

Sanjay K. Dhar

Sanjay K. Dhar

James M. Kilts, Jr. Professor of Marketing

Berkeley Dietvorst

Berkeley J. Dietvorst

Associate Professor of Marketing

Kristin Donnelly

Kristin Donnelly

Assistant Professor of Marketing and Stevens Junior Faculty Fellow

Jean Pierre Dube

Jean-Pierre Dubé

James M. Kilts Distinguished Service Professor of Marketing and Charles E. Merrill Faculty Scholar

Ayelet Fishbach

Ayelet Fishbach

Jeffrey Breakenridge Keller Professor of Behavioral Science and Marketing and IBM Corporation Faculty Scholar

Gunter Hitsch

Guenter J. Hitsch

Kilts Family Professor of Marketing

Andreas Kraft

Andreas Kraft

Assistant Professor of Marketing and Asness Faculty Fellow

Ann L. McGill

Ann L. McGill

Sears Roebuck Professor of General Management, Marketing and Behavioral Science

Sanjog Misra

Sanjog Misra

Charles H. Kellstadt Professor of Marketing and Applied AI

Bradley Shapiro

Bradley Shapiro

Professor of Marketing and True North Faculty Scholar

Stephanie Smith

Stephanie Smith

Avner Strulov Shlain

Avner Strulov-Shlain

Assistant Professor of Marketing and Willard Graham Faculty Scholar

quantitative marketing phd

Abigail Sussman

Professor of Marketing and Beatrice Foods Co. Faculty Scholar

Oleg Urminsky

Oleg Urminsky

Alumni success.

PhD alumni in marketing go on to successful careers at top institutions of higher education across the world. 

Akshina Banerjee, PhD '23

Assistant Professor of Marketing University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, Ross School of Business Akshina studies linguistic influence on consumer decision-making, hierarchical choices, and mental accounting. Her interests are, thus, inherently interdisciplinary, with overlaps in marketing, linguistics, economics, and psychology. Her PhD is in behavioral marketing.

Olivia Natan, PhD ’21

Assistant Professor of Marketing Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley Olivia Natan studies how limited information affects consumer demand and firm behavior. Her empirical work focuses on settings with large product assortments. Her PhD is in marketing.

A Network of Support

At Booth, you’ll have access to the resources of several research centers that help to fund marketing PhD research, host innovative conferences and workshops, and serve as focal points for collaboration and innovation.

James M. Kilts Center for Marketing The Kilts Center facilitates faculty research, supports innovations in the marketing curriculum, funds scholarships for MBA students, and creates engaging programs aimed at enhancing the careers of students and alumni.

Center for Decision Research Devoted to the study of how individuals form judgments and make decisions, the CDR supports research that examines the processes by which intuition, reasoning, and social interaction produce beliefs, judgments, and choices.

Scholarly Journals

Chicago Booth is responsible for the creation and leadership of some of the most prestigious academic journals today. Quantitative Marketing and Economics , for example, which focuses on problems important to marketing using a quantitative approach, was founded in 2003 by Peter E. Rossi, MBA ’80, PhD ’84.

See the full list of academic journals at Booth .

Spotlight on Current Research

Our faculty and PhD students continually produce high-level research. The Chicago Booth Review frequently highlights their contributions in marketing.

Your Spending Habits Are All in Your Head

The way our minds organize mental accounts is a professional interest for Bartels. He and Booth PhD [grad] Lin Fei have been examining how mental representation and the categorization of expenses are crucial to people’s budgeting approaches.

Walter Zhang's BFI Industrial Organization Initiative Award

The Becker Friedman Institute will fund Zhang's research project, "Targeted Bundling" (coauthor: Olivia Natan). This project studies the pricing of digital goods and the potential for increased price targeting in differentiated product markets.

Can a Fictional Ad Man Help Sell Real Cigarettes?

How do depictions of tobacco use affect sales off-screen? Chicago Booth’s Pradeep K. Chintagunta and Sanjay K. Dhar, along with their coauthors Ali Goli (Booth PhD grad) and Simha Mummalaneni from the University of Washington, brought together several datasets to examine this question.

The PhD Experience at Booth

Rima Toure-Tillery, PhD ’13, talks about the Booth faculty’s open-door approach to PhD students.

Rima

Video Transcript

Rima Toure-Tillery, ’13: 00:00 I am assistant professor at Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management. And I am a motivation scholar. I study questions related to factors that influence people's motivation to persist in various types of goals.

Rima Toure-Tillery, ’13: 00:21 I think the PhD's very different from an MBA. You expect to be doing very different things when you're done. With a PhD most of us expect to conduct research, continue to ask deep questions, and just work on finding answers to those questions.

Rima Toure-Tillery, ’13: 00:35 Booth PhD Program is extremely rigorous. You're going to learn from the best. There's a good mix of letting you be in charge of your career and being independent, but also being extremely supportive. Most faculty have an open-door policy so you could just email someone, go to their office and start talking about a research idea. They're really going to help you develop the whole research approach, and thinking about ideas, and taking them from that really half-baked stage to something more advanced. Being able to approach whatever faculty I'm most interested in working with, I think that really permeated my whole time here.

Rima Toure-Tillery, ’13: 01:13 Being in the program really helped me see things in a different light. I really developed some new research interests as I learned more about what I didn't know. You can't solve problems that you don't even know existed. It's been a really amazing experience.

Meet Our Students

PhD students in marketing choose Chicago Booth because our multidisciplinary approach gives them the tools and training for a successful career. Recent dissertations have examined everything from customer retention and consumer purchasing decisions to the economics of retail food waste. Recent graduates have accepted positions at leading research institutions, including UCLA and Columbia University, and have gone on to data science careers in industry.

Current Students

Vanessa Alwan

Salman Arif

Soaham Bharti

Samuel Borislow

Shweta Desiraju

Sara Drango

Fatemeh Gheshlaghpour

Nicholas Herzog

Stephanie Hong

Quoc Dang Hung Ho

Minkwang Jang

Daniel Katz

Xinyao Kong

Juan Mejalenko

Natalie Moore

Timothy Schwieg Andrew Sharng

Semyon Tabanakov Sophie (Jiarui) Wang

Ningyin (Ariel) Xu

Shuqiong (Lydia) Zhao Grace Zhang

Walter Zhang

Program Expectations and Requirements

The Stevens Program at Booth is a full-time program. Students generally complete the majority of coursework and examination requirements within the first two years of studies and begin work on their dissertation during the third year. For details, see General Examination Requirements by Area in the Stevens Program Guidebook below.

Download the 2023-2024 Guidebook!

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Quantitative Research in Marketing

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PhD Program

The Wharton doctoral program offers students an unmatched interdisciplinary environment within which to generate creative ideas and hypotheses and to develop the analytic skills to evaluate them.

Faculty members are active in diverse research areas that connect to initiatives and centers both within Wharton more broadly, and other departments within the university. Recent research topics include such areas as: cognitive processes of consumers; consumer preference measurement; marketing decision support systems; design and adoption of new products and services; and social media and consumer inter-dependencies.

Recent graduates have received offers of faculty positions at leading business schools, including Columbia, Duke, LBS, MIT, Northwestern, NYU, University of Michigan and University of Chicago.

The department offers two degree program options: the Marketing program, which allows students to pursue a Consumer Behavior or Quantitative Track; and a joint degree program in Marketing and Psychology .

Please make sure to look at the Frequently Asked Questions for additional information and links.

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Quantitative Marketing Recent Graduates and Current Students

The Ph.D. program in marketing has an outstanding and impressive track record in terms of quality of placements and research. Below are a list our graduates, placements and awards for dissertation research.

Recent Graduates

Thomas Steenburgh (2004) Initial Placement at Harvard Business School

Jackie Luan (2006) Initial Placement at Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth

Sumon Datta (2009) Initial Placement at Krannert School of Management, Purdue University Awards Winner, 2008 Alden G. Clayton Doctoral Dissertation Award, MSI

Sachin Sancheti (2009) Initial Placement at Cornerstone Research

Hema Yoganarasimhan (2009) Initial Placement at University of California at Davis Awards Winner, 2008 Alden G. Clayton Doctoral Dissertation Award, MSI Winner, Frank M. Bass Outstanding Dissertation Award Finalist, John D.C. Little Best Paper Award

Doug Chung (2012) Initial Placement at Harvard Business School Awards Winner, 2011 ISMS Doctoral Dissertation Competition Winner , ISBM Doctoral Support Award Runner Up, 2011 Mary Kay Doctoral Dissertation Competition

Boudhayan Sen (2012) Initial Placement at McKinsey & Company

Michelle Lu (2015) Initial Placement at McGill University

Navid Mojir (2017) Initial Placement Harvard Business School Awards Winner, 2016 Alden G. Clayton Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Competition, MSI Winner, 2016 ISMS Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Competition Winner, 2015 ISBM Doctoral Support Award

Beomjoon Shim (2017) Electronic Arts

Jai Subrahmanyam (2018)

Jungju Yu (2018) City University of Hong Kong

Minkyung Kim (2019) University of North Carolina Awards Winner, 2021 Don Lehmann Award, Best Dissertation-based article published in Journal of Marketing Research Honorable mention, 2019 John A. Howard / AMA Doctoral Dissertation Award Winner, 2018 ISMS Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Competition

Ishita Chakraborty (2021) Wisconsin School of Business

Minkyu Shin (2021) Initial Placement City University of Hong Kong

Hortense Fong (2022) Initial Placement Columbia Business School

Ankit Sisodia (2023) Initial Placement Purdue Business School

Jason Duan (2008) Initial Placement at University of Texas at Austin

Yaniv Dover (2012) Initial Placement at Dartmouth College

Guofang Huang (2013) Initial Placement at Carnegie-Mellon University

Nathan Yang (2015) Initial Placement at McGill University

Current Students

Richard Archer Peter Sangwoo Lee Seung Yoon Lee Zikun Liu Siddartha Pilla Michael Robinson Ankit Sisodia Fei Teng Chi-Ying Wang (Chi Ying's website ) Ian Weaver Keyan Zhu

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Top 10 Best PhD in Marketing Programs in the US [2024]

Lisa Marlin

How deep do you want to dive into the ever-growing marketing field? A marketing background is a lucrative education choice that brings you applicable expertise for any industry. These days, marketing managers  make upwards of $130,000 per year. A master’s in marketing  is a great start.

But a PhD in marketing takes your career to the highest levels, though not only for individual businesses. You can take that expertise and dive deeper into research or pursue a teaching career in academia.

What are the best marketing PhD programs, and where can you find them? We’ve put together a solid list that even includes online marketing PhD programs for you to choose from!

Table of Contents

Best Marketing PhD Programs and Schools

Arizona state university, w. p. carey school of business, phd in marketing.

Arizona State University logo

ASU was ranked no. 1  by the US News and World Report on its list of the most innovative schools. In this PhD marketing program, you can choose between three tracks: consumer behavior, quantitative marketing models, and service strategy. There are also core courses shared by all streams, which cover research methods and marketing models.

  • Duration: 5 years
  • Tuition : $11,720 per year
  • Acceptance rate: 88.4%
  • Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Harvard University, Harvard Business School

Harvard University logo

Harvard University is a world-renowned Ivy League  university known for its strength in research. This program draws on various disciplines, such as research methods, statistics, computer science , machine learning, and field seminars. After the first two years, students can embark on their dissertation. Although the Harvard Business School offers this program, doctorate candidates can also collaborate with other Harvard schools and MIT.

  • Courses: 13
  • Tuition : $50,928
  • Acceptance rate: 5%
  • Location: Boston, Massachusetts

The University of Wisconsin, Wisconsin School of Business

University of Wisconsin logo

The Wisconsin School of Business has a strong reputation for its excellent faculty and reasonable tuition. The school’s core research areas for their marketing PhD are quantitative modeling, marketing strategy, and consumer behavior. Interested in a research position at a university, or teaching a specialized course? You’ll find many network opportunities if you enroll in this prorgam.

  • Tuition: Refer tuition page
  • Acceptance rate: 57.2%
  • Location: Madison, Wisconsin

Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business

Phd program in marketing.

Carnegie Mellon University logo

Carnegie Mellon University is based in Pittsburgh but has campuses all over the world. Their marketing PhD program covers topics like brand-choice models, marketing/operations interface, and theories of consumer behavior. Students are supported by excellent faculty to pursue quality research in specialty areas like behavioral and experimental economics , high-tech marketing, and two-sided market pricing.

  • Duration: 4 to 5 years
  • Tuition : $47,000 per year
  • Acceptance rate: 17.3%
  • Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

The University of Colorado Boulder, Leeds School of Business

University of Colorado logo

The University of Colorado Boulder is the flagship institution of the University of Colorado system and has nine schools and colleges offering around 150 programs. Its PhD in marketing is an advanced degree covering experimental and statistical methods, predictive modeling, quantitative marketing, and theory building, with crucial courses built around consumer behavior and quantitative modeling.

  • Tuition : $2,811 per credit
  • Acceptance rate: 84.2%
  • Location: Boulder, Colorado

The University of Missouri, Robert J. Trulaske Sr. College of Business

University of Missouri logo

The University of Missouri is a public land-grant university that offers high-quality but affordable education. Its PhD program in marketing focuses on developing teaching and research skills and helps students prepare for careers in various research settings. The program offers small class sizes and promotes a collaborative environment.

  • Semester hours: 72
  • Tuition : $414.60 per credit hour
  • Acceptance rate: 81.8%
  • Location: Cornell Hall | Columbia, Missouri

Florida International University, College of Business

Phd in business administration (marketing).

Florida International University logo

FIU College of Business is a world-renowned institution that falls within the top 5% of elite business schools globally and has been ranked second  in the nation for international business programs. Its PhD in Business Administration with a focus on marketing equips students with the knowledge necessary to establish successful careers in academics and research. The program’s key courses include marketing research methodology, advanced data analysis, and statistical methods in consumer research.

  • Duration: 4 years
  • Tuition : $10,935.36 per year
  • Location: Miami, Florida

Drexel University, LeBow College of Business

Drexel University logo

Drexel University is a well-known private research institution and center of higher learning that emphasizes experiential learning. Its PhD in marketing program covers both the macro and micro aspects of marketing, though with a greater focus on the microelements. You can also choose between electives in economics-oriented or behavior-oriented subjects. Economics-oriented courses include econometrics and advanced microeconomics, while behavior-oriented includes multivariate analysis, and behavioral science research.

  • Tuition : $2,000 per credit hour
  • Acceptance rate: 77.2%
  • Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Liberty University

Online doctor of business administration (dba) – marketing.

Liberty University logo

Looking for online marketing doctoral programs? Liberty University offers various fully online programs flexible enough for working professionals. Its DBA program in marketing includes strategic marketing management, supply chain management, marketing research, and marketing promotions. As one of the only fully-online marketing PhD programs available, it is ideal for working professionals who want to keep a balance between work and study. The program also lets you transfer up to 50% of credits from previous degrees.

  • Credit hours: 60
  • Duration: 3 years (average)
  • Tuition : $595 per hour
  • Acceptance rate: 50.1%

Grand Canyon University, College of Doctoral Studies

Doctor of business administration (dba): marketing (quantitative research).

Grand Canyon University logo

Grand Canyon University is the largest private Christian university with almost 100,000 students. Unlike a qualitative DBA, which attempts to analyze topics using insights into how and why people think and behave, this quantitative DBA focuses on analysis by interpreting numeric data. This online doctorate in marketing includes courses about quantitative data collection and analysis, the complexity of marketing, and digital technology (a PhD in digital marketing is a great specialty!) and consumer behavior.

  • Credits: 60
  • Tuition : $702 per credit
  • Acceptance rate: 80.7%

Should I Get a Doctorate in Marketing?

With a doctorate in marketing, you’ll be eligible for various high-level roles in academia, business, and research. These positions can offer salaries anywhere from $55,000 to $155,000, making the degree a valuable qualification for your CV.

Of course, like any discipline or program, a marketing PhD has advantages and disadvantages.

Advantages of Having a PhD in Marketing:

  • Excellent career prospects:

A PhD in marketing will qualify you for roles at the highest levels of business management, which you otherwise might not access with a master’s alone. Alternatively, you use this degree to pursue a career in academia and research.

  • Job opportunities in academia:

A PhD is a prerequisite if you want to teach marketing at a post-secondary level or pursue certain research career paths.

  • Scope for innovation:

A PhD in marketing helps you contribute to advances in the field, especially in cutting-edge areas like artificial intelligence and natural language processing. In contrast, a master’s degree has a smaller scope for research.

Drawbacks of a PhD in Marketing:

  • You have to wait to launch your career:

Studying a PhD is a serious time investment: it takes around five years to complete for most people. Of course, this is after you’ve already completed your bachelor’s and master’s degrees, so it will take you an average of 11 years before the degree brings you higher on the career ladder.

  • It’s a balancing act:

By the time you start your PhD, you might have a family to take care of. As a result, managing your studies, research, and family could be a challenge.

How to Choose a Marketing Doctoral Program?

With so many options, you might have trouble picking from the top marketing PhD programs. Here are some essential factors to consider before deciding:

1. Your career goals

You might be able to build a worthwhile career in marketing with a master’s degree . But for heavy research and academic or teaching work, you’ll need a PhD. If you’re not interested in teaching or research, you might reconsider the time and financial commitment needed to complete a marketing PhD.

2. Accreditation

Check each school you’re considering for their regional accreditation. Some marketing programs may even have programmatic accreditation to look out for. This is an important factor in picking a reputable program that’s attractive to potential employers.

3. Mode of delivery

If you’re already a working professional, full-time, on-campus study might not be an option for you. In this case, you must look for a PhD in marketing online that offers remote learning and flexibility.

These are just a few ideas to keep in mind. Weigh all your options and listen to your gut feeling in the end.

Alternatives to a Marketing Major

Marketing is a specialized discipline with well-defined objectives, needing specific skillsets. However, in today’s interconnected world, various disciplines share many of the same concepts.

You can still build a high-level career in marketing with qualifications in different fields, like:

  • Advertising
  • Data analytics
  • Strategic management
  • Analytical management
  • Production management

Careers with a PhD in Marketing

A PhD in marketing can open doors to various top-level roles.

Here are some of the most common roles for professionals with a marketing doctorate, with the median annual salaries for each:

  • Marketing Manager ( $67,696 )
  • Market Research Analyst ( $55,742 )
  • Chief Executive Officer (CEO) ( $156,413 )
  • Professor (Marketing) ( $89,181 )

What Do You Need to Get into a Marketing Doctoral Program?

Every marketing PhD program has specific admission requirements. Always double-check by referring to the admission webpage or contacting a school representative. Usually, a master’s degree in a related field is required for admission.

Most programs will also require:

  • A statement of purpose , research proposal, or both
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Academic resume
  • GRE/GMAT scores may or may not be required

PhD Marketing vs. Master’s Degree: Which is Better?

A master’s degree in marketing is a career-oriented qualification that can propel you into a meaningful marketing career for a variety of corporations or small businesses. On other hand, marketing PhD programs are generally research-based and will give you more specialized knowledge that equips you for a career in the academic sphere.

PhDs also require a much more significant time and financial commitment.

PhD in Marketing FAQs

What can you do with a phd in marketing.

Popular career choices for marketing PhD grads include market research analysts, chief marketing officers, and marketing professors. This advanced degree will not only equip you for roles in senior management, but also the fields of research and academia.

How Many Years is a PhD in Marketing?

A PhD in marketing typically takes five years to complete. However, some universities allow you to earn your doctorate in as little as three years, though usually only if you have enough transfer credits. At the other end of the scale, your PhD may push out to up to seven years.

Is There a PhD in Marketing?

Yes. Many universities offer a PhD degree in marketing, as well as online marketing doctorate programs for working professionals. Some schools also offer a comparable DBA (Doctor of Business Administration)..

Can I Do a PhD in Marketing After an MBA?

Yes, you can do a PhD in marketing after completing an MBA. In fact, you might consider completing a DBA to be more in line with your studies.

Key Takeaways

You can access a wealth of career opportunities available with an MBA or another master’s degree . But if you want to open more doors in research and academia, a PhD in marketing is the way to go. With so many online study options, it’s easier now than ever to complete a remote degree while juggling work or a family.

If you want to explore more options for excellent advanced degrees, take a look at our guides for:

  • Best online PhD in Psychology programs
  • History PhD programs
  • Best PhD programs in California

Lisa Marlin

Lisa Marlin

Lisa is a full-time writer specializing in career advice, further education, and personal development. She works from all over the world, and when not writing you'll find her hiking, practicing yoga, or enjoying a glass of Malbec.

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California Quantitative Marketing Ph.D. Student Conference

Stanford Graduate School of Business, 29 April 2023.

The 1st California Quantitative Marketing Ph.D. Conference at Stanford University will bring together Ph.D. students and faculty across five California schools in the field of quantitative marketing. The conference provides a forum for the presentation and discussion of student research. Student presenters will have the opportunity to share their work and receive feedback from peers and faculty members. Student discussants will get a chance to present a careful discussion of a paper, talking about its strengths and its contribution to the literature while also providing suggestions for improvement. The conference program also includes a panel discussion with faculty and a social event at the end of the day, allowing for casual conversations and the development of new friendships. Overall, the conference aims to provide early opportunities for Ph.D. students to engage in research discussions and forge connections across the five California schools.

Faculty Coordinator

quantitative marketing phd

Sridhar Narayanan

Ph.d. student organizers.

ameeqa_ali

Christy Kang

Headshot

Irina Yakovetskaya

Registration.

This event is by invitation only. Registration will end on Thursday, April 20, 2023.

If lodging needed, please click here for suggestions: Stanford Area Lodging Search

Participants

jpg

Giselle Alvarez

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IMAGES

  1. PhD Seminar in Quantitative Marketing Research

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  2. Give a compressive guide to quantitative Market Research. And explain

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  3. Quantitative Market Research: The Complete Guide

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  5. Quantitative Marketing: Data-Driven Strategies and Challenges

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  1. Marketing Research

  2. Quantitative market research / Marketing Application using regression

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COMMENTS

  1. Quantitative Marketing

    The PhD degree in Marketing is a research degree that prepares students for academic positions at top research universities. Students can specialize in either the behavioral (psychology-based) or quantitative (economics, statistics and machine learning-based) approaches to marketing.

  2. Marketing Requirements: Quantitative Track

    Practicum Students are required to sign up for either research or teaching practicum each quarter of enrollment. Below is a description of the practicum requirements for quantitative marketing students. Year 1: Regularly attend and participate in the Marketing and Work-in-Progress (WIP) seminars.

  3. Marketing

    In the quantitative marketing track, students are exposed to the fundamentals of economics (microeconomics, industrial organization, econometrics, etc.) and how to use them to address marketing problems such as mathematical modeling of buyer-seller interactions, consumer choice processes, the allocation of marketing resources into components of ...

  4. Marketing, PhD < University of Pennsylvania

    View the University's Academic Rules for PhD Programs. The Ph.D. program in Marketing is based on the completion of the dissertation as well as a minimum of 15 graduate level course units. The degree and major requirements displayed are intended as a guide for students entering in the Fall of 2023 and later.

  5. Marketing

    Quantitative Marketing This program provides excellent training in all the skills and perspectives necessary for success as an academic researcher. Starting with a rigorous foundation in economics and statistics, students learn how to identify, develop, and implement research ideas that advance theory and practice.

  6. Program Requirements

    Harvard Business School → Doctoral Programs → PhD Programs → Marketing → Program Requirements Marketing Program Requirements Below please find the program requirements for a students in Marketing. Doctoral students in Marketing generally complete the program in five years. Coursework A minimum of 13 semester courses at doctoral level are required.

  7. Marketing

    Quantitative Marketing The PhD degree in Marketing is a research degree that is focused on developing cutting-edge skills that are needed to do research on the frontiers of marketing. Behavioral Marketing The PhD program in Behavioral Marketing at Yale focuses on how individuals think and behave in consumer-relevant domains.

  8. Marketing

    The quantitative marketing faculty at Stanford emphasize theoretically grounded empirical analysis of applied marketing problems. This line of inquiry draws primarily on fundamentals in applied microeconomic theory, industrial organization, and econometrics and statistics. Questions of interest include:

  9. Curriculum

    BA961: Seminar in Quantitative Research in Marketing BA962: Seminar in Consumer Behavior BA963: Marketing Models Seminar BA964: Experimental Design and Analysis Seminar BA965: Automaticity BA966: Social Cognition BA991: Selected Topics (recent special topics seminars have included Consumer Research, Marketing Strategy, and Research Methods)

  10. Program Design

    Students can learn about substantive research areas of marketing in several ways. They include: taking the required doctoral seminars in marketing, attending and participating in workshops, working with the faculty, and reading research papers. The Marketing area offers doctoral courses in both the quantitative and behavioral areas of marketing.

  11. Marketing Department

    Stern's Marketing Ph.D. program is extremely selective and, once accepted, students benefit from the faculty's dedication to ensuring a positive and productive doctoral experience. The department fosters a nurturing environment with close collaboration between doctoral students and faculty members.

  12. PhD Program Marketing

    Within marketing, PhD students complete four marketing seminars (two in quantitative marketing and strategy, two in consumer behavior). These seminars cover the key areas of academic marketing research and provide students a broad perspective of the field of marketing.

  13. Marketing PhD

    PhD in Marketing Develop your research skills in consumer behavior or economics/quantitative methods and prepare for a career at a leading research institution. Our Marketing PhD Program gives you a strong theoretical foundation and builds your empirical skills.

  14. Quantitative Research in Marketing

    Course Code MKT 897 Hours 1.5 hours Type Elective Offered Quantitative Research in Marketing --- This Doctoral-level course covers current research in Marketing that utilizes the tools and techniques of microeconomics, econometrics, multivariate statistics, game theory, or other relevant source disciplines.

  15. PhD in Marketing

    Students complete four PhD seminar courses in marketing from the core areas of research: quantitative modeling, consumer behavior, and marketing strategy. These seminar offerings vary from year to year.

  16. PhD Program

    The department offers two degree program options: the Marketing program, which allows students to pursue a Consumer Behavior or Quantitative Track; and a joint degree program in Marketing and Psychology. Please make sure to look at the Frequently Asked Questions for additional information and links.

  17. Quantitative Marketing Recent Graduates and Current Students

    Recent Graduates. Thomas Steenburgh (2004) Initial Placement at Harvard Business School. Jackie Luan (2006) Initial Placement at Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth. Sumon Datta (2009) Initial Placement at Krannert School of Management, Purdue University. Awards.

  18. Top 10 Best PhD in Marketing Programs in the US [2024]

    Doctor of Business Administration (DBA): Marketing (Quantitative Research) Should I Get a Doctorate in Marketing? Advantages of Having a PhD in Marketing: Drawbacks of a PhD in Marketing: How to Choose a Marketing Doctoral Program?

  19. 93 Quantitative Marketing Phd Jobs

    Research Scientist Intern, Graph Science and Statistics Research (PhD) Meta Seattle, WA. $7,500 Monthly. Internship. Currently has, or is in the process of obtaining, a PhD degree in a quantitative field such as Statistics, Computer Science, Information Science, Data Science, Quantitative Marketing or relevant ...

  20. Quantitative marketing PhD jobs

    Quantitative marketing PhD jobs. Sort by: relevance - date. 253 jobs. JP Morgan Chase Institute Research Lead - Small Business and Local Economies. JPMorgan Chase & Co. Washington, DC 20005 ... Masters or PhD in a quantitative field (e.g., ...

  21. Quantitative Marketing PhD Alumni Conference

    The Quantitative Marketing PhD Alumni Conference brings together Stanford PhD graduates — who are now faculty in marketing departments — to present their work to current faculty, PhD students, and more senior alumni from the PhD Program. This year's conference was held on April 15-16, 2022, at Stanford GSB.

  22. California Quantitative Marketing Ph.D. Student Conference

    Stanford Graduate School of Business, 29 April 2023. The 1st California Quantitative Marketing Ph.D. Conference at Stanford University will bring together Ph.D. students and faculty across five California schools in the field of quantitative marketing. The conference provides a forum for the presentation and discussion of student research.