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noun as in academic degree

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  • Associate's
  • Associate's degree
  • Bachelor's
  • bachelor's degree
  • graduate degree
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  • master's degree
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noun as in doctor's degree

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noun as in postgraduate degree

  • advanced degree
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  • postgrad degree

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Words related to phd are not direct synonyms, but are associated with the word phd . Browse related words to learn more about word associations.

noun as in college degree

noun as in academic degree of highest rank

noun as in degree after bachelor's

Example Sentences

He also bragged about earning a PhD, a point Smerconish did not question.

Even his nametag played up his dweeby nature, labeling him “Mr. Gruber, PhD.”

Throughout her life, she faced public ridicule, legal persecution and, eventually, redemption through a PhD in clinical sexology.

“It is impossible by elections to choose normal people,” argues Yoram Gat, an Israeli software engineer with a PhD in statistics.

The son of Taiwanese immigrants, he grew up in California and earned his PhD in neuroscience at Stanford.

Damn few of them got it from me, I'm happy to say, and those that did, knew more about the subject than most PhD's.

It was a great diversion from the late nights working on my PhD.

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On this page you'll find 21 synonyms, antonyms, and words related to PhD, such as: associate's, associate's degree, bachelor's, bachelor's degree, degree, and graduate degree.

From Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

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abbreviation or noun

Definition of phd, examples of phd in a sentence.

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'PhD.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

New Latin philosophiae doctor

1839, in the meaning defined above

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“PhD.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/PhD. Accessed 22 Feb. 2024.

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  • Capella University Blog
  • PhD/Doctorate
  • From a to z: doctoral degree glossary

From A to Z: doctoral degree glossary

August 19, 2015

As you consider a PhD or professional doctorate program, you might find you need to learn a new language just to understand the doctoral degree process and outcomes. Here are the most common terms (and their definitions) you might encounter.

ABD: “All but dissertation.” An unofficial phrase which describes a PhD candidate who has completed all the requirements of the degree program except for the final dissertation—and without the dissertation, the PhD cannot be awarded. It is NOT a recognized credential.

Accreditation : A quality assurance process that certifies educational institutions or programs for achieving and maintaining commonly recognized high standards. There are several career areas where graduating from an accredited program can make a difference in the type of career and the rate of pay graduates can earn. Learning about industry standards in your chosen field and what accreditation(s) are available are important points of research.

Colloquia/colloquium: See Residency

Comprehensive exam (also called qualifying, general, preliminary, or major field exam): Comprehensive exams (often simplified as “comps”) allow students to demonstrate competency within their program, and serve to ensure they are prepared to move into the dissertation phase of the degree.

Programs may also require students to complete qualifying or preliminary exams. These may be similar to comprehensive exams and may be taken in lieu of or in addition to comprehensive exams. Comprehensive exams are generally distinguished by their breadth of focus, and are designed to ensure students can demonstrate knowledge and readiness for the dissertation.

Dissertation : The dissertation is the final step in the PhD process after successful completion of the comprehensive exams. The actual project depends on the program, but regardless of the field of study, there will be a large research component that is meant to be developed into a final degree deliverable that will increase the body of knowledge in the chosen field, either by adding new contributions or by expanding and deepening previous studies. It will take the form of a written project that evaluates and interprets the research the PhD candidate has completed, usually in a five-chapter format that can run several hundred pages. It’s an independent project that’s the most intensive form of research and writing a doctoral candidate will undertake.

Dissertation advisor: Students will have a dissertation advisor to turn to for help in overcoming obstacles, managing time, writing advice, and planning for the dissertation. Generally an advisor is assigned by the university early in the student’s doctoral process, although some universities allow the student to select their own advisor. The advisor can guide a student through selecting coursework that will be the foundation needed to approach writing a dissertation. The advisor can also assist in navigating university policies and processes, and providing career advice or resources.

Dissertation milestones (phases of research): There are generally three primary stages of writing a dissertation (although at Capella University, there are 16 milestones along these three stages, to keep the process in small, manageable pieces):

  • Proposal. By the time students complete coursework and colloquia, they should have selected a topic. Preparing the proposal involves developing the research plan and methodology; and obtaining approvals of the topic and research plan from the mentor, committee, and the Institutional Review Board (IRB).
  • Data collection and research. The student takes the approved research plan and begins research.
  • Writing. Once the research is complete, it’s time to write the dissertation. Generally, a dissertation will have five chapters: an outline of the full background of your study; a comprehensive literature review supporting your research; a discussion of your choice of research design, data collection, and analysis, and details of the research steps; the actual data analyses and results; and the final evaluation and interpretation of your results. (Some universities may require a sixth chapter of conclusions.)

IRB (Institutional Review Board): An IRB is a standing committee at a university that examines potential research projects to ensure that humans involved in the research are protected and the appropriate safeguards are in place. Dissertation research is always subject to IRB approval.

Mentor : Depending on the university, a mentor is either assigned to a student or chosen by the student early in the PhD process and is the first point of contact for questions and concerns about the program. They’re able to advise the student as to his/her academic progress and recommend resources, but they also provide emotional support and resources for managing non-academic issues that may be obstacles for the student, such as work-life balance, family issues, etc. In many cases, the mentor may help with career advice as well as academic guidance. They will guide the student through the research and dissertation process, often providing a more personal relationship.

PhD : The most common type of doctoral degree awarded in the U.S. The PhD prepares students to conduct research and contribute new knowledge in their field, with career outcomes usually focused on continued high-level research or entry to academia.

Professional Doctorate : A doctoral degree with a primary focus on applied research; considered a more career-focused degree. Professional doctorates will apply knowledge in the field rather than continuing research or teaching, or they will conduct research that will solve real-world problems in their specific field.

Qualitative research: Qualitative research focuses on examining a topic via cultural phenomena, human behavior, or belief systems. This type of research utilizes interviews, open-ended questions, or focus groups to gain insight into people’s thoughts and beliefs about certain behaviors and systems.

Quantitative research: Quantitative research involves data-gathering across a wide range of participants in order to uncover relationships, trends, or other characteristics across groups. This type of research involves statistical analysis of demographic, survey, experimental, or similar numerical data.

Research methodology : Working towards a PhD requires a dissertation, which requires research that studies a problem or gap in knowledge. There are several research methodologies available, but the most commonly used are the qualitative and quantitative methods (see above).

Residency: A transition step between coursework and the dissertation, residencies are meant to prepare the student for the dissertation work. Residency formats vary from school to school, but in general, there’s an in-person component that’s different from regular coursework. The content varies depending on your degree program, but students will likely learn how to identify a research problem and topic, conduct a literature review, develop a well-formed research question, select the correct research methodology and design, and begin developing a research strategy.

NOTE: Some universities may call this step colloquia. Additionally, it’s important to know that, depending on the context, a “residency” may have an entirely different function (such as a PsyD residency, which has different goals and objectives and is likely to include hands-on training in the field).

Scientific Merit Review (SMR): For a researcher to conduct ethical research, the research must demonstrate potential benefits that can offset potential risks to participants. Part of the IRB process is to consider the scientific merit of the study and determine if it has a reasonable risk/benefit ratio. The greater the risk a study presents, the more attentive the IRB must be to study design and scientific merit.

A study lacking in clear design or scientific merit has little benefit to justify participant risk. In contrast, a carefully designed study with clear potential for benefit may justify some degree of participant risk, presuming such risk is disclosed and minimized to the extent possible.

There are three criteria a dissertation must meet to receive approval on scientific merit:

  • Will the research advance the scientific knowledge base?
  • Will the research contribute to research theory?
  • Does the research meet certain hallmarks of good research methodology?

Terminal Degree: A PhD or professional doctorate are considered a terminal degree—the highest academic achievement that can be attained.

Capella University offers PhD and professional doctorate degrees in programs ranging from business to education and health to technology. Learn more about Capella’s doctoral degree programs .

You may also like

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December 11, 2019

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The difference between a dissertation and doctoral capstone

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  • Guide to Applying for Graduate School

The process of preparing for and applying to a PhD program can be overwhelming. The University of Pennsylvania has created this webpage to help prospective PhD students think through the process so you can put together a strong application.

A Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is the highest degree one may obtain within a particular field of study. This ranges from studies in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields; Social Science fields such as Education, Economics, Political Science, and Sociology; as well as Humanities fields such as English, History, Music, Philosophy, and more. The PhD degree aims to prepare people to think critically, develop research, and produce scholarship that may be used for further research or implementation. The PhD historically prepared students to take on faculty roles in colleges and universities, and that is still the goal for many students pursuing the PhD. However, today the PhD is a sought-after degree in many other industries including pharmaceutical research, arts organizations and other nonprofits, publishing, government policy, big tech, finance, and more.

  • Who can apply to a PhD program?  PhD education is available to people from various educational, occupational, socioeconomic, and demographic backgrounds.
  • Who should get a PhD?  People interested in uncovering new ideas, solutions, processes, etc. within a specific area of study through conducting independent research.
  • Why is it important for diverse candidates to become PhD holders?  Our world thrives on heterogeneous ideas and experiences, which is why it is indispensable to include students with diverse perspectives in our PhD programs. These students will generate important and original research.

Most PhD programs are fully funded, meaning that for a specific number of years, the program will pay for your tuition and fees and health insurance, as well as provide you with a stipend for living expenses. The structure of this funding varies by field. Below is an outline of general funding information as well as trends according to field of study.

  • Funding packages provided by educational institution.
  • Funding packages provided through faculty research grants: Many STEM fields fund students through research grants awarded to faculty. In these cases, students perform research alongside the faculty. 
  • Teaching Assistantships or Research Assistantships: Part-time service that provides teaching and research training opportunities within your area of study.
  • Fellowships: Internal or external merit-based funding. Some fellowships require an application while others are given via nomination. Educational institutions typically have a resource listing fellowship opportunities. Winning a competitive fellowship looks good on your resume.
  • Grants: Requires an application with supporting materials of either your grades, scholarly work, and/or anticipated research. These are available through internal and external means. Grants greatly vary so be sure to always understand the requirements. Educational institutions typically have a resource listing grant opportunities. Winning a competitive grant looks good on your resume.
  • Employment: For example, serving as a residential advisor, on-campus jobs, etc. Some PhD programs restrict additional employment, so be sure to check before applying for jobs.
  • The funding opportunities described here often can be combined.

Choosing a school or program that provides the most potential funding may be a challenging decision. The value of the same amount of funding will differ depending on the cost of living in different geographic locations. Admitted applicants should investigate cost-of-living tools (available on the web) and be sure to understand how their funding will be structured. Ask questions when you are admitted, such as: 

  • Could you share more about your program’s funding mechanism?
  • For how long is funding guaranteed? How does that compare to the average time-to-completion? Historically, what percentage of students have received funding beyond the guaranteed funding package?
  • Does funding cover tuition, fees, books, etc.?
  • Does the funding rely on teaching, research, or other service? How much and for how long? 

Choosing a program for your studies is a personal decision that should reflect not only your research interests, but your work style, and interests outside of the classroom. Here we have identified five key tips to consider when selecting schools. 

  • Ask about which programs are strong in your area of interest, which have high completion rates, which have career outcomes that align with your goals, etc. 
  • Conduct a general internet search with terms related to your research interest.
  • Determine your geographic and personal preferences. Does the area meet your community needs? Is it important that the university aligns with your sociopolitical values? Do you prefer a large city or a smaller/college town? Is there a particular region(s) that has better access to resources needed to conduct your research?
  • Access your current or former university career center. These services are often still available for former students!
  • As you narrow your choices, try to identify at least 3 faculty in the programs of interest with whom you’d like to study. Also note how many of them have tenure. If relevant, research which of those faculty are taking on advisees in your year of matriculation.
  • Read articles from faculty with similar research interests.
  • Note the number of awards, publications, and service activities of faculty.
  • Identify research opportunities funded by both your program and university at large.
  • Connect with current and former students in the program for informational interviews.
  • Connect with campus Diversity Offices.
  • Whenever possible, before submitting your applications, make an appointment to visit the campuses and department(s) that interest you.
  • Use  LinkedIn  to see what graduates of your program are doing and how they are involved in their communities.
  • Estimate your feasible cost of living by geographic location and compare to the funding package offered.
  • Consider availability of health insurance, childcare, housing, transportation, and other fringe benefits.
  • Connect with a local bank or your prospective university’s financial services office for budgeting, savings, and other financial wellness advice.
  • Your First Year in a Ph.D. Program
  • What Does Academic Success Mean and How to Achieve it?  (STEM)
  • Pathways to Science  (STEM)
  • 7 Advantages PhDs Have Over Other Job Candidates  (Industry)
  • During your undergraduate/master’s education, you should pursue coursework and/or research that will prepare you for the higher expectations of a PhD program; for example, taking a research methods course, pursuing a summer research experience, or conducting research with a professor at your home institution.
  • Identify instructors who could write a letter of recommendation. Ask them to write letters even if you do not intend to apply to PhD programs immediately. Their letter will be stronger if they draft it while their memory of you is fresh.
  • Experiences outside of higher education can also strengthen your PhD application. These may range from project management to volunteer work.
  • Develop soft or hard skills. A soft skill that is most useful from the first day of your PhD program is networking. This is necessary not only for meeting other students but also to find collaborators with similar research interests and selecting faculty for your dissertation committee. Learning how to negotiate will also serve you well when approaching collaborative projects. Hard skills related to your field might include learning statistical analysis software, economic theory, a foreign language, or search engine optimization. In short, identify a few soft and hard skills that you can familiarize yourself with prior to your program’s start date.
  • Finally, prepare by identifying leading researchers and practitioners in your field, exploring peer-reviewed literature and/or publications, and gain familiarity with research methods.
  • Be sure to address all the specific questions/topics in the personal statement prompt. 
  • Clearly state why you want to pursue a PhD.
  • Propose your research interest.
  • Identify the faculty you’d like to study under. 
  • Discuss the unique qualities/experiences you offer to the program/school.
  • Outline what you hope to do with your degree.
  • Ask for recommendation letters early in the process, at least 2-4 weeks before the deadline. A good letter takes time to write!
  • Provide recommenders with your resume, information about the program, your personal statement and/or information about your research interests and research goals.
  • Consider your current/former instructors, supervisors, colleagues. These should be people who can speak to your work ethic, academic abilities, and research interests.
  • Test scores (i.e. TOFEL, GRE, GMAT, etc.) may or may not be required.
  • All transcripts including those for coursework completed abroad and transfer credits. Some programs require official transcripts, which take longer to procure.
  • Writing sample (field dependent): Include a graduate-level sample and update any statements, statistics, etc. as needed. It is highly encouraged that you edit your previous work.
  • Diversity statement: Many institutions offer an optional short statement where students can expand on their diverse backgrounds and experiences that may contribute to the diversity interests/efforts of the school.
  • Typically, PhD applications are due 10-12 months in advance of the program’s start date (i.e. apply in November to start the following September). A good rule of thumb is to begin your application process 6 months before the deadline. 
  • The availability of reduced application fees or fee waivers varies and sometimes depends on financial status and/or experiences (AmeriCorps, National Society of Black Engineers, attending certain conferences, etc.). If you are interested in a reduced fee or waiver, reach out to the program coordinator for details.
  • Dress professionally, even if the interview is virtual. You don’t necessarily need to wear a suit but dress pants/skirt and a blouse/button down shirt would be appropriate.  
  • Develop an engaging elevator pitch, a 30-60 second summary, of your research interests and what you hope to gain by becoming a student at that particular university. Practice your pitch with friends and ask for honest feedback.
  • Prepare 2-3 questions to ask during the interview. These could include questions about program expectations, the experience and success of their PhD students, and (academic/financial/mental health) support for PhD students.
  • Some interview programs will include multiple activities including a social event. Be sure to maintain a professional attitude: do not drink too much and keep conversation on academic/professional topics.
  • This is also your opportunity to decide whether this campus is a good fit for you.
  • Academia Insider  is a good resource. 

Unlike undergraduate and master’s level education, coursework is just one component of the degree. A PhD comes with additional expectations: you must independently conduct scholarly research in your field of study, train in specific activities such as teaching or lab/field research, pass “milestone” requirements along the way, such as comprehensive exams, and complete the process by writing a dissertation. Furthermore, some fields require you to write multiple articles (number varies by field/program) for conference presentation and/or peer-reviewed publication.

There are other important elements as well:

  • Student/Advisor relationship. This is one of the most valuable relationships you can have as a PhD student. Your faculty advisor not only assists you with learning how to approach your research topic, but also typically serves as the lead supervisor of your dissertation research and writing, and ideally mentors you throughout the PhD experience. The selection process of choosing your advisor varies so be sure to know what is expected of you as a student and what is expected of the faculty member. Whenever possible, it is important to align your personality and work style with that of your faculty advisor. Many universities publish expectations for the PhD student/faculty advisor relationship;  AMP’ed  is Penn’s guide.
  • Other relationships: Your faculty advisor is far from the only important person during your PhD career. Other faculty members will also serve on your dissertation committee and be potential mentors. Other students in your program can also provide good advice and guidance along the way.
  • Coursework: Most programs have a number of required courses all students must take regardless of research interests. Once you have finished this requirement, the classes you choose should closely align with your research topic. Choose courses that will help you learn more about your dissertation topic and research methods. It is a good idea to discuss elective course selection with your advisor. 
  • The dissertation is a large-scale, written document that explores a narrow research topic of your choice. It is the final step before receiving your degree and must be presented and “defended” to your dissertation committee (made up of faculty members) for approval. Defending means that you have to answer in-depth questions about your topic. While this might sound daunting, the dissertation is simply a demonstration of all the knowledge and expertise you have acquired through your PhD education. 
  • Networking comes in many forms and includes connections with your fellow classmates, faculty members, and scholarly community. Formal networking events typically take place at academic conferences, where scholars and students present research. Increasing your academic circle will not only allow you to have study buddies, but offer you the opportunity to collaborate on articles or even gain employment. Your school’s career center can provide best practices for effective networking. 

Explore  graduate programs at the University of Pennsylvania  and click on the programs that interest you to learn more about admissions and academic requirements.

Upcoming Penn recruitment events include:

  • Fontaine Fellows Recruitment Dinner (by invitation only): Friday, March 22, 2024
  • IDDEAS@Wharton  (Introduction to Diversity in Doctoral Education and Scholarship): April 18-19, 2024. Deadline to apply is January 31.
  • DEEPenn STEM  (Diversity Equity Engagement at Penn in STEM): October 11-13, 2024. Application opens in March 2024.
  • DivE In Weekend  (Diversity & Equity Initiative for Mind Research): Fall 2024

National conferences to explore:

  • The Leadership Alliance  supports students into research careers
  • McNair Scholar Conferences
  • SACNAS , the largest multidisciplinary and multicultural STEM diversity event in the U.S.
  • ABRCMS , the annual biomedical research conference for minoritized scientists
  • The PhD Project  for students interested in business PhD programs

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Can’t decide between the MD, the PhD, or the combined MD-PhD program? Join the Director of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania MD-PhD Program, Dr. Lawrence “Skip” Brass, to explore whether MD-PhD training is the right path for you and to learn how to be a competitive applicant.

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PhD Career Pathways Program Info Session - Summer 2024

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Join us to learn more about the NEW Summer 2024 Ph.D. Career Pathways Fellowship program, a professional development, and project-based internship opportunity for Ph.D. students in the humanities, social sciences, and arts where fellows are selected to work in community and professional organizations. During this session, you will learn about the various sites and hear from current fellows! 

Fellows are paired with a dedicated Ph.D. career advisor and participate in professional development seminars throughout the academic year where they: 

  • Build a community with fellow graduate students from different departments who are exploring similar options
  • Learn how to translate their skills into different professional contexts 
  • Explore career options outside of academia

Register on Handshake . 

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Research and Research Impacts Resources for PhD Students

Icon of a magnifying glass looking at a gear.

Research in your discipline is an important skill you will develop throughout your program. The professional development skills in research that you gain in your degree program will be unique to your discipline. You will cultivate discipline-specific research skills through completing courses, degree requirements, research roles, and through more applied experiences like internships or field rotations.

Graduate students typically take research methods classes as part of their degree program at UB and have research requirements like producing a master's thesis, project or doctoral dissertation.

But, there are multiple skills to learn, disciplinary research and research skills beyond your discipline. How can you gain research skills or build upon your current skills?

1.

Write a fellowship.

2.

Write a grant.

Grant writing skills are critical to completing and disseminating your research and a mark of success in academic and professional careers. To gain these important skills, students can assist faculty with grant proposals, attend a grant writing workshop hosted by the Graduate School or submit a grant on their behalf.

Graduate Professional Development offers  grant writing workshops  for graduate students in STEM disciplines and Social Sciences/Humanities. Workshops are offered online and live twice yearly and recorded for additional access.

1.

Complete training in responsible conduct of research.

All students admitted to a PhD program for the fall 2009 semester or thereafter are required to document successful completion of Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training when they submit their PhD Application to Candidacy form for their PhD degree. This training requirement may be fulfilled by either (1.) Enrolling in and passing with a grade of B (3.00) or better LAI 648 Research Ethics or RPG 504 Responsible Conduct of Research or BMS 514 Intro to Scientific Investigation and Responsible Conduct or RSC 602 Research Ethics for the Health Sciences or (2.) Completing a Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) online Responsible Conduct of Research course with an average score of 80 percent or higher, or (3.) Successfully completing UB's Responsible Research micro-credential . Students opting to complete the CITI online course or the Responsible Research micro-credential must supply proof of completion with their PhD Application to Candidacy.

4.

Serve as a Research Assistant (RA).

Faculty with research grants or contracts hire graduate students as research assistants (RA). The RA assignment and funding are tied to the faculty member's work. Discuss research assistantships with your faculty mentor or director of graduate studies. 

5.

Present your research.

Any time you present your research you improve your communication skills. Present in your research group, at department talks, and to groups outside of your discipline. Each type of research talk is valuable to your professional development.

Every year in April the University at Buffalo hosts a campus-wide student showcase of research as part of the  Celebration of Academic Excellence . Departments nominate graduate students to present their research posters for the showcase. Attend the showcase to learn about the research happening across the university and apply to present your research.

6.

Attend research talks in and out of your department.

Take advantage of all the public research talks in and out of your department. Even if the research is not something you're familiar with, you can learn about the wider research in your discipline and pick up communication tips. Asking questions of experts and getting to network with the speaker and attendees is also important for professional development.

7.

Think about how your research fits into diverse career paths.

Your research does not necessarily lead you into one specific career path. Take time to explore how your research interests and skills can be applied to multiple career paths, both inside and outside of academia. Online Individual Development Plans (IDPs) and platforms, such as MyIDP for STEM disciplines and ImaginePhD for humanities and social sciences, give you a way to assess your skills and see how they match to opportunities. UB also subscribes to Beyond the Professoriate , which helps graduate students and postdoctoral fellows understand and articulate how their research skills match with career and job opportunities.

Through UB's Social Impact Fellows program , MBA and MSW students from the School of Management and School of Social Work, along with graduate students from the College of Arts and Sciences create social innovation in Western New York. Together, students collaborate, address pressing issues and make an impact.

Fellowships and scholarships are among the most valuable forms of aid you can receive during your college career and are designed to support students who have exceptional academic records and potential. Meet with the Office of Fellowships and Scholarships to discuss scholarship opportunities. 

University Libraries offer an outstanding array of information resources, technologies, services and people to support the academic and creative achievements of our students.

Other Research Training Opportunities

  • Research Bootcamp—Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Research Design (BERD)
  • SUNY Office of Research, Innovation and Economic Development
  • Build Your Research Community is a free course consisting of five modules offered by the Science Communication Lab. This course guides science trainees through identifying mentors and building and maintaining strong mentoring relationships.
  • The University Libraries offer research support. They have compiled Research Guides by discipline, Research Tips on locating materials, and Workshops to assist students, including Endnote, Microsoft Excel, database searching and more.

External Resources

  • Google Scholar Profiles  is a way to showcase your academic publications. If your profile is public, you will appear here when people search for your name.
  • Research Gate  is a free platform that connects science and research communities. Connect with experts in your field.
  • Research Rabbit  is an innovative citation-based literature mapping tool available online.
  • Connected Papers  is a tool to help researchers and applied scientists find and explore papers relevant to their field of work in a visual way.

Stay Informed

The graduate brief.

Every Wednesday during the semester, the Graduate School emails the "Graduate Brief" to all graduate and professional students, which is a weekly selection of news and happenings within the Graduate School and its partnering offices. If you would like to be added to the mailing list, please contact [email protected] .

Upcoming Events

Understanding Pathological Narcissism

Dissertation in One Minute

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Ellen Finch, a PhD student in psychology at Harvard Griffin GSAS, is on a mission to destigmatize and help people understand pathological narcissism, a personality style characterized by an elevated, but unstable, sense of self. Finch explores how this controversial and often misunderstood condition is developed and maintained through certain behaviors, including grandiose fantasizing and self-bolstering memory recall and future thinking. Finch’s research provides valuable insights that contribute to clinicians' ability to understand and treat this complex condition.

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Photo of laughing girls dividing up a cake with their bare hands

How Politicians Can Draw Fairer Election Districts

New research from Yale Professor Kevin DeLuca, PhD '23, and colleagues proposes a new method of electoral redistricting that delivers fairer results and requires neither cooperation between members of the two major parties nor an independent arbiter to resolve disputes.

What Happens When a Wind Farm Comes to a Coal Town?

On National Public Radio, PhD student Eleanor Krause says coal mines can't always be replaced with wind turbines to provide alternative sources of energy production and alternative sources of jobs.

 View of some ridgetop wind power turbines from the summit of Blue Knob

Women, Men, and Time: Reframing Workplace Practices

The pioneering research of Lotte Bailyn, PhD '56, connects organizational priorities and employee well-being in a way that is foundational to work practices today.

Illustration of Lotte Bailyn, PhD '56

'Russia Will Always Matter'

Fiona Hill, PhD '98, warns U.S. against losing focus on Ukraine and Russian President Vladimir Putin amid Israel-Hamas war.

Fiona Hill, PhD '98, speaking at Harvard Kennedy School

IMAGES

  1. GRADUATE: Synonyms and Related Words. What is Another Word for GRADUATE

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  2. Graduate synonyms

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  3. GRADUATE: Synonyms and Related Words. What is Another Word for GRADUATE

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  4. 44 Graduate student Synonyms. Similar words for Graduate student

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  5. University Degree synonyms

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  6. Know The Differences Between Professional Doctorate And PhD

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  5. What Does 'PhD' Stand For?

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  13. From a to z: doctoral degree glossary

    PhD: The most common type of doctoral degree awarded in the U.S. The PhD prepares students to conduct research and contribute new knowledge in their field, with career outcomes usually focused on continued high-level research or entry to academia. Professional Doctorate: A doctoral degree with a primary focus on applied research; considered a ...

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    Need synonyms for PhD student? Here's a list of similar words from our thesaurus that you can use instead. Noun. A student engaged in a postgraduate course. postgraduate. student. graduate. postgrad. graduate student.

  19. Career Management and Self-Development Resources for PhD Students

    Attend department talks and events to get to know faculty, guests and fellow graduate students. Go to conferences in your discipline. You'll be able to meet speakers, fellow graduate students and people in your field. Participate in university-wide clubs and organizations. You'll connect with other graduate students who share similar interests.

  20. Graduate Professional Development for PhD Students

    Graduate professional development topics for doctoral students at the University at Buffalo including research and research impacts, teaching and mentoring, communication, career management & self-development, leadership, entrepreneurship & innovation, wellness & life balance and equity & inclusion.

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  22. Communication Resources for PhD Students

    Individual consultations can support graduate students working in a language outside their native language. The CEW holds dissertation retreats, dissertation cafés, writing groups and more throughout the year. Be sure to subscribe to the Graduate Writing Support listserv to receive emails about graduate writing and dissertation support programs.

  23. Wellness and Life Balance Resources for PhD Students

    Every Wednesday during the semester, the Graduate School emails the "Graduate Brief" to all graduate and professional students, which is a weekly selection of news and happenings within the Graduate School and its partnering offices. If you would like to be added to the mailing list, please contact [email protected].

  24. MD-PhD and Physician Scientist Career Pathways

    Join the Director of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania MD-PhD Program, Dr. Lawrence "Skip" Brass, to explore whether MD-PhD training is the right path for you and to learn how to be a competitive applicant. ... Tags: MCS Programs & Workshops, Apply to Graduate or Professional School, Class Year, Expand Your ...

  25. PhD Career Pathways Program Info Session

    Join us to learn more about the NEW Summer 2024 Ph.D. Career Pathways Fellowship program, a professional development, and project-based internship opportunity for Ph.D. students in the humanities, social sciences, and arts where fellows are selected to work in community and professional organizations. During this session, you will learn about ...

  26. Research and Research Impacts Resources for PhD Students

    Graduate students typically take research methods classes as part of their degree program at UB and have research requirements like producing a master's thesis, project or doctoral dissertation. ... All students admitted to a PhD program for the fall 2009 semester or thereafter are required to document successful completion of Responsible ...

  27. Understanding Pathological Narcissism

    Ellen Finch, a PhD student in psychology at Harvard Griffin GSAS, is on a mission to destigmatize and help people understand pathological narcissism, a personality style characterized by an elevated, but unstable, sense of self. Finch explores how this controversial and often misunderstood condition is developed and maintained through certain ...