Drawing Conclusions

Drawing conclusions is an essential skill for comprehending fiction and informational texts. Passages with text-dependent questions, response activities, worksheets, and test prep pages provide practice through a variety of literary, science, and social studies topics at every grade level.

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Drawing conclusions

Figuring it out for yourself.

When we read we are constantly making inferences about things not explicitly said.  These worksheets give students practice in drawing conclusions from short texts.

drawing conclusion worksheets

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Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

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Reading Passage and Draw a Conclusion Activity

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Using Drawing Conclusions Graphic Organizers and Worksheets

When it comes to enhancing reading comprehension and critical thinking skills in students, drawing conclusion worksheets play a pivotal role. By engaging in drawing conclusions activities and using drawing conclusions graphic organizers, students learn to examine the details presented in a story or article and make a judgment based on the evidence they find. These exercises help students to identify the main idea, understand the consequences of events, and explain their thoughts using both words and pictures. Whether it's through drawing conclusion practice with a drawing conclusions passage or utilizing free drawing conclusion worksheets, students’ ability to support their conclusions with data from the text is crucial. Drawing conclusions activities not only help in understanding fiction and non-fiction narratives but also enhance skills in making inferences about what might happen next or why something occurred.

Starting with simpler tasks, drawing conclusions practice involves examining details and visual clues in a story or article to form a judgment. As they progress, students delve deeper into drawing conclusions activities where they write and explain their reasoning, backing it up with evidence. This practice is essential in understanding the main idea and the underlying narrative presented. Teachers often use a drawing conclusions passage as a first step to introduce the concept, followed by more complex draw conclusions activities where students can apply these skills in various contexts, such as fiction and non-fiction texts.

Draw Conclusions Activities and Worksheets

  • Mystery Bag Drawing Conclusions Activity: Place various items in a bag (e.g., a seashell, a leaf, a spoon). Have students pick an item without looking and use a drawing conclusions worksheet to write down what they conclude about the item's origin or use, using clues and their own knowledge.
  • Create Your Own Story Conclusion: Provide students with the beginning of a story using a drawing conclusion passage. Ask them to write or draw the ending based on the details given. Use drawing conclusions graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts.
  • “Detective Day” with Drawing Conclusion Worksheets: Turn the classroom into a detective scene where students have to solve a mystery using drawing conclusions activities. Each student gets a worksheet with clues and must use these to solve the mystery.
  • Comparing Fiction and Non-Fiction: Use a mix of free drawing conclusions worksheets based on both fiction and non-fiction texts. Have students identify the main idea and draw conclusions in both, noting the differences in how they form conclusions based on the type of text.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

Can drawing conclusions activities be integrated with other subjects.

Absolutely! Drawing conclusions is a skill that can be integrated across various subjects. For example, in science, students might examine data and draw conclusions about experiment results. In social studies, they could analyze historical events or societal trends. This multidisciplinary approach reinforces the importance and applicability of the skill in different contexts.

What are some interactive ways to teach drawing conclusions?

Interactive methods include group discussions where students share and debate their conclusions, role-playing activities where they act out scenarios and draw conclusions based on character actions, and detective-style games where they use clues to solve mysteries. These activities make the learning process engaging and thought-provoking.

How can drawing conclusions worksheets be used for different age groups?

For younger students, worksheets should focus on simple stories or pictures, encouraging them to draw conclusions based on visual clues and basic narratives. As students grow older, the worksheets can include more complex texts and require detailed analysis, teaching them to identify subtle hints and make informed judgments based on the evidence presented in the text.

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Drawing Conclusions

A conclusion is a reasonable decision you make based on the facts and details given in a text. An author may not clearly state a certain fact in the text…so you may need to draw your own conclusion when reading to figure out what is being implied by the author. Drawing conclusions helps you better understand the reading. Read More...

◂ English Language Arts Worksheets and Study Guides Fifth Grade. Drawing Conclusions

English Language Arts - Fifth Grade - Study Guide: Drawing Conclusions

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Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

Related ela standard: rl.4-6.1.

The goal and the purpose of reading for understanding is to come away with new information that you previously did not have. In order to do this we often have to find some that is implied by the text or we can infer from what has been presented to us. We often make inferences based on our own experiences. The inferences we see can have a huge impact on our knowledge level gained. The worksheets found below can used to help your students draw conclusions earlier from what they read. These worksheets will require you to use your own judgment; the answer isn't floated to you.

Drawing Conclusions Worksheets To Print:

What's Next? - See if you can determine the setup of what will happen in each of the reading passages. We cover a wide range of topics that are sure to engage students.

Conclusions from Visual Details - You are given three pictures that will need to read into. You might need to print this one out in color.

In the Articles - You will need to pick just about any article you would like. It is best if you have a very meaty article handy to get going here.

What Is Going On? - There are two sentence entries here that you will need to think about. Your mom is very busy in this one.

Where Is It? Settings - You are all about where each of these takes place.

The Eagle and the Fox - On the back of this page, write a short paragraph that describes the fox's personality.

What's the Neighborhood Like? - These are pictures from a nice neighborhood down the street from me.

Great and Little Bear - Why did the god Jupiter save Callisto and Arcas?

Only Three Words... - On the lines, write three words or phrases that you used as clues to arrive at your answer.

The Study of Botany - Plants can really keep people busy. There is a lot more than just sunlight, water, and soil involved.

About People... - What kind of person is the speaker in each sentence?

What's for Lunch? Using Visual Details - When is each kind of food being served? What can you conclude about the person that is going to eat it?

Size Matters! - Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

Three Conclusions - Cite evidence from the text to support your answers.

For the Cause of Freedom - What is Patrick Henry trying to convince his audience to do?

Read Into Passages - Read each passage below. What is about to happen? Write it on the line and explain your answer.

Mr. Potts - What do you think Mr. Potts is going to say? Why?

The Crystal Ball - What do you think Ellie will do?

Outlined - We examine how to include evidence into your process.

Lorenzo the Great - Put your magic to work.

Where You At? - Where is the passage taking place? Write it on the line and explain your answer.

On the Road and Couch - We show you a nice way to proceed with this.

The Season - What time of year is it?

Get After It - Read each paragraph, then answer the questions. On the lines, write three words or phrases that you used as clues to arrive at your answer.

The Obvious - Choose the answer that makes the most sense.

About People - Read each passage. What conclusions can you draw about the character? Write your answer on the line. Briefly explain your answer.

Letting Readers Go For It - This is often done to communicate things about character traits or the setting because it’s more interesting for the reader than just stating some facts.

Single Passage - Take your time to get your thoughts through on the paper.

Working It Well - What thoughts do you see in this work?

About Characters - Choose a character from a book you have recently read.

How Do You Draw Conclusions From What You Read?

It really depends on the type of piece you are reading as to whether the author states the information you are looking for. In most works of nonfiction the facts and events are clearly presented to you. In works of fiction and most forms of literature, the beauty of the work is that conclusions are not clear and the reader is left to come up with their own thoughts. You can often look at small implications made in the work and make solid inference from this with some basic evidence.

There is a simple process you can use to pull conclusions out of what you read. The first step to drawing a conclusion is to identify the overall plot. You should be able to explain to another person in less than a minute. Who is doing what? What is their motivation for doing this? Once you understand where the characters are going with the story, you can start to pinpoint where evidence lies within the reading to gauge this. The evidence is usually uncovered looking through context clues.

Writers often imply information about what they write just like when we communicate verbally our body language gives off more information than we are saying. Commonly facial expressions or hand movements give us plenty more information to digest. When we are drawing a conclusion from a written piece, you should be able to spot hints or clues that can help you have a good understanding of where it is going. Once you compile all of the information the author has given you, use your personal experience to see if you can put together a logical concept of what will happen. The more practice you get with this skill, the easier it will be for you.

Why This Skill Is Important

Being able to take action upon the information that you have dived into is the key to making solid and well thought out decisions. Making a conclusion is an opinionated choice but is often rooted in truth because it is covered in well known facts that are abundantly clear in the data or information that is available. The process that you take to reach this level of certainty is not vague or unclear. A level of clarity exists to make this level of decision and drives the person involved in the process to make a good choice. Make sure that you do not confuse a conclusion with an inference. They both involve you making a determination about what is not presented or stated, but a conclusion is more focus on understanding what the next rung in the ladder should be. This is the same basic process that an attorney takes to build case, but just on a smaller scale. Being able to substantiate an argument to others is a skill that takes years to get right. The process of doing this well requires a good level of experience to learn to piece sets of information together and present it a logical and easy to understand manner. The ultimate goal is to help sway the opinion of an audience in a convincing fashion.

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Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

Yes Or No

Jenny’s Morning Routine

Setting Detective

Setting Detective

Magnifying The Clues

Magnifying The Clues

What Season Is It?

What Season Is It?

Clues To Conclusions

Clues To Conclusions

Picking A-B-C

Picking A-B-C

Personality Puzzle

Personality Puzzle

Inferring Frank

Inferring Frank

Billy And Coco

Billy And Coco

Scene Sleuth

Scene Sleuth

Picture It

The Beeping Sound

Unlocking The Time Of Year

Unlocking The Time Of Year

Discovering The Implied

Discovering The Implied

Choosing The Right Fit

Choosing The Right Fit

Characterization Revelation

Characterization Revelation

Getting Into Context

Getting Into Context

Conquering Mount Fairmont

Conquering Mount Fairmont

Evidential Insights

Evidential Insights

Making Deductions

Making Deductions

Make Them Wonder

Make Them Wonder

Beyond The Surface

Beyond The Surface

The Process Of Presumption

The Process Of Presumption

From Explicit To Implicit

From Explicit To Implicit

Back It Up With Proof

Back It Up With Proof

Persona Sketch

Persona Sketch

Deconstructing What You Know

Deconstructing What You Know

Factual Foundations

Factual Foundations

Anticipate The Next Thing

Anticipate The Next Thing

All about these worksheets.

These worksheets can be used to help students practice and improve their inferential thinking and comprehension skills. The ability to draw conclusions is an important aspect of understanding a text, whether it’s a narrative, an article, or any form of written content. It requires students to use clues or information from the text and combine them with their own knowledge to make an inference or a reasonable judgment.

Types of Problems

Direct Inferences – These questions ask students to make a direct inference from information provided in the text.

Example: After reading a passage about a girl wearing a raincoat and carrying an umbrella, a question might ask, “What is the girl preparing for?” The conclusion: She is preparing for rain.

Predictions – Students will need to use given information to make a guess about what might happen next.

Example: “John was studying hard for weeks. Tomorrow is the big test. What do you think John is preparing for?” The conclusion: John is preparing for his test.

Cause and Effect – Identifying reasons why something happened or predicting outcomes based on a cause.

Example: “Every time it rained, Mary’s old roof leaked. What can you conclude?” Conclusion: Mary’s roof is in bad condition.

Character Analysis – Drawing conclusions about a character’s feelings, motives, or characteristics based on their actions or words.

Example: “Sam always gave half of his lunch to his friend who forgot his. What can you say about Sam?” Conclusion: Sam is generous and caring.

Theme or Moral – For stories, students might be asked to infer the overall message or lesson.

Example: After reading a story about a boy who lied and faced consequences, “What is the lesson of the story?” Conclusion: Lying can lead to negative consequences.

General Comprehension – Sometimes, students will need to draw conclusions about main ideas, settings, or other elements of a text.

Example: “After reading about various landmarks and cultural elements, where do you think this story is set?” Conclusion: The story is set in France.

Using Pictures or Diagrams – Some worksheets might incorporate visual elements, requiring students to draw conclusions based on images combined with text.

Example: A picture of a wilted plant next to an empty watering can might lead to the question, “What does the plant need?” Conclusion: The plant needs water.

In all these cases, the aim is to encourage students to think critically and inferentially, rather than just recalling explicit details from the text.

How to Draw a Conclusion About What You Read

Drawing a conclusion about a reading passage requires careful analysis, critical thinking, and synthesis of information. Here are some steps to help you effectively draw a conclusion:

Read the passage carefully: Thoroughly read and understand the passage, taking note of important details, themes, and arguments. Make sure to comprehend the author’s main points and purpose.

Identify the main idea: Determine the central theme or message of the passage. This can usually be found in the thesis statement, topic sentences, or in recurring ideas throughout the text.

Look for supporting evidence: Examine the evidence, examples, and arguments the author provides to support their main idea. This can include data, anecdotes, quotes, or expert opinions.

Consider the author’s tone and perspective: Analyze the author’s tone and perspective, considering whether they are objective, subjective, persuasive, or informative. This can provide insights into the author’s intentions and help you better understand their conclusion.

Examine the structure and organization: Evaluate how the passage is structured and organized. Look for logical connections, transitions, and coherence between ideas, which can indicate a well-reasoned argument or conclusion.

Make connections: Connect the information presented in the passage to your prior knowledge or other relevant sources. This can help you identify patterns, similarities, or differences that may be significant to the conclusion.

Synthesize the information: Summarize the main points and evidence, and consider how they relate to each other. This synthesis will help you draw a well-informed conclusion.

Formulate your conclusion: Based on your analysis and synthesis, formulate a conclusion that reflects the main idea, evidence, and overall message of the passage. Your conclusion should be concise, clear, and supported by the text.

Reevaluate and refine: Revisit your conclusion to ensure it is accurate and supported by the passage. Consider alternative interpretations or viewpoints, and refine your conclusion if necessary.

By following these steps, you can effectively draw a conclusion about a reading passage, demonstrating a deep understanding of the text and its purpose.

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Drawing Conclusions

Drawing conclusions worksheets, language arts categories, free weekly worksheets, worksheets by email, how to draw conclusions based on what you read.

Drawing conclusions based on reading is not always a walk in the park. You have to be vigilant and have your mind open to tracking the nitty-gritty that constructs a piece of writing. However, if you have been struggling to write conclusions, you may follow the tips below. Chances are, you might find the outcomes rejoicing. Notice the Detailing in the Writing - While you are reading, ensure you are not missing any details. In the case of a creative piece of literature, the author may have added some crucial details of a story in the depths of the book without keeping them apparent at all. However, as a reader and a writer, constructing a concluding piece, you may dig deep in the nitty-gritty of the book so that you don't miss anything. Write Pointers - Let's face it; you can't always remember the most crucial details. In case you are only memorizing them; you'll only struggle while you write the conclusion. So, ensure you are adding pointers as you read through the text so that you may have no chance of missing any details. All in all, the process of concluding might smoothen out to quite an extent.

drawing conclusion worksheets

What's Happening?

Read each passage below. What is about to happen? Write it on the line and explain your answer.

drawing conclusion worksheets

What Do You Think?

Read the story. Then answer the questions. Is Mrs. Keppler going to hire Molly?

drawing conclusion worksheets

Francine Makes a Plan

Does Francine have self-confidence? What do you think Francine is going to do?

drawing conclusion worksheets

What Evidence Do You Have

Draw three conclusions from the reading. The conclusions could have to do with what happens to the people in the passage or a prediction about what will happen next. Cite evidence from the text to support each conclusion.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Read the beginning of each story. Draw a conclusion about what is happening.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Where Is That?

Read each passage. Where is the passage taking place? Write it on the line and explain your answer.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Reading Into It

Millie goes out into her backyard to get into her swimming pool. She has just gotten into the water when she hears thunder in the distance. What is about to happen?

drawing conclusion worksheets

Time of Year

Read each passage and draw a conclusion about the season.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Three Phases

Read each paragraph, then answer the questions. On the lines, write three words or phrases that you used as clues to arrive at your answer.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Obvious Conclusions

Choose the answer that makes the most sense.

drawing conclusion worksheets

About People

Read each passage. What conclusions can you draw about the character? Write your answer on the line. Briefly explain your answer.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Past Participles

Writers don't always explicitly say everything that they want a reader to know. Sometimes they include details which allow the readers to draw their own conclusions about what is going on.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Using Supporting Details

List at least three details from the passage that support your answers.

drawing conclusion worksheets

Three Thoughts

Read the assigned text. Then draw three conclusions from what you have read. Cite evidence from the text to support your answer.

drawing conclusion worksheets

About Characters

Choose a character from a book you have recently read.

drawing conclusions worksheets

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Free Printable Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions Worksheets for 9th Grade

Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions with these free printable ELA worksheets for Grade 9 students! Enhance their critical thinking skills and help them discover hidden meanings in texts. Ideal for ELA teachers.

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Explore printable Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets for 9th Grade

Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets for Grade 9 ELA are essential tools for teachers looking to enhance their students' reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. These worksheets provide a variety of engaging texts and activities that challenge students to analyze information, make connections, and draw well-supported conclusions. By incorporating these worksheets into their lesson plans, teachers can help Grade 9 students develop the ability to read between the lines, understand implied meanings, and make educated guesses based on textual evidence. As students work through these activities, they will gain valuable practice in using context clues, making predictions, and evaluating the validity of their conclusions. Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets for Grade 9 ELA are an invaluable resource for teachers seeking to improve their students' overall literacy skills.

In addition to traditional worksheets, teachers can also utilize digital platforms like Quizizz to provide interactive and engaging learning experiences for their Grade 9 ELA students. Quizizz offers a wide range of pre-made quizzes and activities that cover topics such as making inferences and drawing conclusions, allowing teachers to easily integrate these critical skills into their curriculum. Furthermore, Quizizz allows teachers to create their own custom quizzes, enabling them to tailor the content to their specific learning objectives and classroom needs. By combining the use of Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets for Grade 9 ELA with the interactive features of Quizizz, teachers can create a dynamic and effective learning environment that fosters the development of essential reading comprehension and critical thinking skills.

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Common core math, math worksheet generators, printable game generators, free making inferences and drawing conclusions worksheets.

Few writers spell everything out clearly in their writing. In order for students to become strong readers and critical thinkers, they must learn to read between the lines. These worksheets encourage students to make inferences and draw conclusions using a variety of high-quality texts.

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Making Inferences/Drawing Conclusions Practice Worksheets

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Grades 10-12

Making inferences/drawing conclusions reading passages.

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Determine and state the conclusion of the story on the completion of reading.

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Drawing Conclusion

Reading Worksheets, Spelling, Grammar, Comprehension, Lesson Plans

Draw a Conclusion: Visual Details

About this worksheet:.

Life is in the details! This worksheet shows your student three pictures, then asks questions about each one. The worksheet is great inference practice for middle school Common Core Standards for Reading Literature or Reading Informational Text. Other grades may also find it helpful.

Drawing Conclusions Worksheet Activity for Middle School

COMMENTS

  1. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

    These drawing conclusion worksheets ask the student to evaluate details and make a judgment. Learning to draw conclusions as they read is an important tool for students, as it aids in comprehending text. Click on the worksheet title to view the details and download a free, printable worksheet activity. Be sure to check out all of our reading ...

  2. Conclusions & Inferences Worksheets

    Choose your grade / topic: Grade 1 - Drawing conclusions worksheets. Choose the conclusion that "makes the most sense" based on the short text. Grade 2 - Conclusions & inferences worksheets. Use what the story says and what you already know to pick the best answer to each question. Grade 4 - Drawing conclusions and making inferences worksheets.

  3. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

    Drawing Conclusions Worksheets. Home > English Language Arts Worksheets > Drawing Conclusions. These worksheets work on developing both your writing and reading skills. You will read a passage and either be asked to infer or guess where it is going. We will provide students with these passages, but we also have two worksheets that can be ...

  4. Practice Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions

    Grade 1 conclusions worksheets. In grade 1 we introduce drawing conclusions. These worksheets start with sentences and move onto paragraphs from which students need to draw conclusions. Grade 2 conclusions and inferences practice. Grade 2 students also start to practice making inferences. We've created six worksheets for students to practice ...

  5. drawing conclusionsDrawing Conclusions Worksheets & Free Printables

    Our drawing conclusions worksheets give kids practice with asking questions and making inferences about text. The ability to draw conclusions is essential for developing reading comprehension skills. These worksheets are tailored to meet readers at their level. They include visual stories for emerging readers, visuals plus text for early ...

  6. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets & Lesson Plans

    Drawing conclusions is an essential skill for comprehending fiction and informational texts. Passages with text-dependent questions, response activities, worksheets, and test prep pages provide practice through a variety of literary, science, and social studies topics at every grade level.

  7. Drawing conclusions worksheets for grade 1

    These worksheets give students practice in drawing conclusions from short texts. Sentences: Worksheet #1 Worksheet #2. Paragraphs: Worksheet #3 Worksheet #4. Similar: Story elements Cause and effect.

  8. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets for Students

    Each student gets a worksheet with clues and must use these to solve the mystery. Comparing Fiction and Non-Fiction: Use a mix of free drawing conclusions worksheets based on both fiction and non-fiction texts. Have students identify the main idea and draw conclusions in both, noting the differences in how they form conclusions based on the ...

  9. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets for 4th Grade

    This worksheet features three situations. Your student will answer the questions based on the clues in the text. It's a great way to practice inference, especially for 4th grade Common Core Standards for Reading Literature or Reading Informational Text. It's a good activity for other students as well. Your student will draw a conclusion ...

  10. Reading for Comprehension: Drawing Conclusions

    Experienced readers are able to draw conclusions based on hints, or evidence, found elsewhere in the book or passage. In this reading comprehension worksheet, children read six short passages and draw a conclusion about each one based on context clues. Designed for third and fourth graders, this worksheet offers valuable practice for students ...

  11. Drawing Conclusions. 5th Grade ELA Worksheets and Answer Key

    Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts. (NCTE) Drawing Conclusions. Home schooling. 5th Grade Printable English Language Arts Worksheets and Answer Key, Study Guide. Covers ...

  12. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

    The inferences we see can have a huge impact on our knowledge level gained. The worksheets found below can used to help your students draw conclusions earlier from what they read. These worksheets will require you to use your own judgment; the answer isn't floated to you.

  13. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

    These worksheets can be used to help students practice and improve their inferential thinking and comprehension skills. The ability to draw conclusions is an important aspect of understanding a text, whether it's a narrative, an article, or any form of written content. It requires students to use clues or information from the text and combine ...

  14. Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

    Draw three conclusions from the reading. The conclusions could have to do with what happens to the people in the passage or a prediction about what will happen next. Cite evidence from the text to support each conclusion. View Worksheet. Answers.

  15. Drawing a Conclusion Worksheets

    About this Worksheet: In this fun worksheet, your student will decipher the clues in the text to reach the correct conclusion. He'll also have to write the ending of the story. You'll find this useful for Common Core Standards for Reading: Informational Text and Reading Literature for grades 5 through 7. It may also be appropriate for other ...

  16. 50+ Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets on Quizizz

    These worksheets are designed to cater to different grade levels, ensuring that teachers can find the perfect resources to suit the needs of their students. With a wide range of topics and formats available, Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets are a valuable addition to any teacher's toolkit.

  17. Results for drawing conclusions worksheets

    Drawing Conclusions Worksheet Packet! These worksheets teach inferencing skills and common vocabulary used in everyday life. The multiple choice questions are supplemented with a creative writing assignment at the end of each page. This is an ideal tool for teaching inference skills in reading for elementary students.

  18. Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions Worksheet

    These three worksheets on making inferences and drawing conclusions are a useful teaching tool for any primary English Lesson. Each page includes a short passage and an image for students to make inferences about. The stories are full of relatable elements your class should be familiar with. Then, there is a section for students to write their ...

  19. 50+ Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets for 9th Grade

    Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions worksheets for Grade 9 ELA are essential tools for teachers looking to enhance their students' reading comprehension and critical thinking skills. These worksheets provide a variety of engaging texts and activities that challenge students to analyze information, make connections, and draw well-supported ...

  20. Free Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions Worksheets

    In order for students to become strong readers and critical thinkers, they must learn to read between the lines. These worksheets encourage students to make inferences and draw conclusions using a variety of high-quality texts. Worksheets labeled with are Common Core Standards aligned and accessible to Pro subscribers only.

  21. Drawing Conclusions from Pictures

    Drawing Conclusions from Pictures. About this Worksheet: Can your student discover the answers to the questions just by looking at the picture? If he can, then he's making good inferences! This worksheet is a good way to work on Common Core Standards for Reading Literature or Reading Informational Text for 4th and 5th grades, although you may ...

  22. Drawing Conclusion worksheet

    Level: Grade 1. Language: English (en) ID: 108700. 18/04/2020. Country code: BS. Country: Bahamas. School subject: Reading Comprehension (1061649) Main content: Drawing Conclusion (1861739) Determine and state the conclusion of the story on the completion of reading.

  23. Draw a Conclusion: Visual Details

    Life is in the details! This worksheet shows your student three pictures, then asks questions about each one. The worksheet is great inference practice for middle school Common Core Standards for Reading Literature or Reading Informational Text. Other grades may also find it helpful. Your student will use visual clues to make inferences about a ...