An 80,000 word PhD thesis would take 9 hours to present. Their time limit... 3 minutes.

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Brilliant ideas conveyed in three minutes or less.

What is the 3MT® Competition?

The  Three Minute Thesis  (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. This event challenges graduate students to present a compelling speech about their research and its significance to non-academic persons in just three minutes using only one presentation image. 3MT® commenced in 2008 and is currently held in over 900 universities across more than 85 countries worldwide. In 2020, the 3MT® competition moved to a temporary virtual format due to COVID-19 and continues to be held around the world in either a virtual or live format (depending on local COVID-19 restrictions).

The goals of the competition are to (1) highlight the excellent research conducted by graduate students and (2) improve graduate students’ communication of research to non-specialist and non-academic audiences. The judges of the competition are educated professionals in a variety of positions in corporate, government, and non-profit industries. 

3MT® Timeline

March-april.

Graduate students are invited to register for the 3MT® Competition.

Graduate students registered for the 3MT® Competition will be required to participate in workshops to prepare them for the competition.

The Preliminary Heats usually take place in the first week of November to determine the graduate students that will advance to the final round of the competition one week later.

The KU winner moves on to represent KU at the regional 3MT® Competition, which takes place in late March or early April during the annual meeting of the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS). 

RELATED LINKS

  • MAGS 3MT® Competition
  • University of Queensland 3MT® Competition

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PREVIOUS COMPETITIONS

  • 2022 KU 3MT® Competition
  • 2021 KU 3MT® Competition
  • 2020 KU 3MT® Competition

3MT® Competition @ KU

Purdue University

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Three Minute Thesis (3MT®)

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  • Three Minute Thesis®

Three Minute Thesis

Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland. The competition develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills and supports the development of students' capacities to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to an intelligent but non-specialist audience.

During each competition, graduate students will have three minutes to present a compelling discussion on their research topic, including its significance and relevance, to the general public. 3MT® is not an exercise in trivializing or "dumbing down" research, instead, it forces competitors to consolidate their ideas and crystallize their research discoveries. This is a fast-paced competition where the top 10 finalists compete by summarizing their two to three-plus years of research in only three minutes with only one slide.  Cash awards are given to the winner, runner-up, and People's Choice Award winner.

3MT® at Purdue

Enrolled graduate students in all disciplines at Purdue University are eligible to participate in 3MT®. Research presented must have been conducted at Purdue University, not from a previous degree, and should be in the final stages so students have some sound conclusions and impacts to present. Purdue Alumni are not eligible to participate.

Purdue holds its annual 3MT® competition early each spring. It is a celebration of the discoveries made by graduate students and will allow the broader community to learn about ongoing research at Purdue. It is free and open to the public. Cash awards are given to the winner, runner-up, and People's Choice Award winner.

2024 Competition Timeline

  • Friday, February 9, 11:59 PM -  Grad Student Video Submissions Due
  • Monday, April 8  - Rehearsal, Fowler Hall 5:00 p.m. EST
  • Tuesday, April 9 -  Competition, Fowler Hall, 7:00 p.m. EST

 Cash Awards

  • 1st place $5,000 
  • 2nd place $3,000 
  • People's Choice $2,000 

A panel of judges will select the first and second-place winners, while the People's Choice Award will be selected by the audience.

2023 Winners

First place: elina dawoodani, health and human sciences.

Second Place: Vamsi Krishna Bandaru, Engineering

People’s Choice: Isaiah Mensah, Agriculture

Graduate Student Submissions

The Graduate School welcomes submissions from all Purdue University disciplines. For help with presenting and visual aids please see the following free professional development workshops.

Please read the 3MT® competition rules in the drop-down button below.

Video Competitor Guide

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted (no slide transitions, animations or "movement" of any description).
  • No additional electronic media (e.g., sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g., costumes, musical instruments or laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to three minutes maximum, and competitors exceeding three minutes are disqualified.
  • The decision of the judging panel is final, and People's Choice voting results will not be released.
  • All presentations will be videotaped and will appear on the graduate school 3MT® website.
  • Students who are over the cost of attendance allowance may not be eligible for prizes.

Each 3MT® presentation will be judged based on communication style, comprehension, and engagement. Please view our archive of video presentations made by past winners .

Please email the program administrators at  [email protected]  if you have any questions!

/images/cornell/logo35pt_cornell_white.svg" alt="3mt thesis"> Cornell University --> Graduate School

Computer science and statistics ph.d. candidates win three minute thesis competition.

3MT winners Yurong You, Kim Hochstedler, and Lidia Komondy

For the first time in Graduate School history, two doctoral candidates tied for first place in the eighth Cornell Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, held on March 30, on Zoom.

Yurong You, a doctoral candidate in computer science, and Kim Hochstedler, a doctoral candidate in statistics, wowed the judges and took home co-first place for their presentations, “Can Autonomous Vehicles Learn from Their Own Memories?” and “The Heart of Misdiagnosis,” respectively. Each were awarded the top prize of $1,500.

Alongside six other finalists, Hochstedler and You presented their dissertation research in just three minutes to a panel of judges and a virtual audience from across campus and around the world. Presentations were judged by how clearly and compellingly students summarized their research to a general audience, using only one static slide.

Second place and $1,000 was awarded to entomology doctoral candidate Lidia Komondy for her presentation, “Seeing is Believing, if You Know Where to Look,” and after nearly 100 audience members cast their ballots, votes were tallied and the People’s Choice Award and $250 were also presented to You.

This year’s judges included Eldora Ellison, Ph.D. ‘94, a member of Cornell’s Board of Trustees; Kim Wagner ‘85, a member of Cornell’s Board of Trustees; Bruno Shirley, an Asian literature, religion, and culture doctoral candidate and 2022 first place winner; and Matt Ranieri ‘06, M.S. ’09, Ph.D. ‘13, president of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Alumni Association.

“The presentations were fascinating and came from finalists with expertise in so many impressive and diverse research topics. It was amazing to see how impactful these research projects were to the world,” said Komondy. “This experience helped me realize how important scientific research is outside the lab and how important it is to keep the public updated on the implications of our research findings.”

Kim Hochstedler, Yurong You, and Fangming Cui at the 3MT reception at the Big Red Barn.

Each of the winners agreed that participating in the 3MT was a great way to practice talking about their research in a way that engages and excites individuals outside of their fields and that the experience will influence the way they share their research going forward.

“The best way to explain things is to stand in the audience’s shoes and use simple words,” said You. “Participation in 3MT will undoubtedly shape my future presentations.”

Hochstedler said, “As I continue to communicate my research in future presentations and projects, I think these lessons of how to connect with an audience and explain my work succinctly will remain valuable. I now feel very prepared for the next family reunion when people ask me what I’m working on at Cornell!”

The 3MT competition was first held in 2008 at the University of Queensland and has since been adopted by over 900 universities in over 85 countries. 3MT challenges research degree students to present a compelling story on their dissertation or thesis and its significance in just three minutes, in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Cornell’s Graduate School first hosted a 3MT competition in 2015 and the event has grown steadily since that time.

“The 3MT is an excellent way for our doctoral students to practice communicating complex ideas to a broader audience, which is a skill beneficial not only for their time as students but for when they enter the professional world as well,” said Kathryn J. Boor, dean of the Graduate School and vice provost for graduate education. “We are so proud of each and every one of this year’s finalists.”

2023 3MT Finalists

Watch the 2023 three minute thesis competition finale..

Yurong You

Co-First Place and People’s Choice Award: Yurong You , computer science doctoral candidate

Watch Yurong You’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “Can Autonomous Vehicles Learn from Their Own Memories?”

Special Committee Chair: Killian Weinberger and Bharath Hariharan

Area of Research: Machine learning, computer vision

Biography: Yurong You is a Ph.D. candidate in computer science, advised by Prof. Kilian Q. Weinberger and Prof. Bharath Hariharan. Before he came to Cornell, he received his bachelor’s degree from Shanghai Jiao Tong University (ACM honors class). His Ph.D. research focuses on enhancing 3D perception for autonomous vehicles, particularly through innovative methods.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: Amazing people at Cornell!

Kimberly Hochstedler

Co-First Place: Kimberly Hochstedler, statistics doctoral candidate

Watch Kimberly Hochstedler’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “The Heart of Misdiagnosis”

Special Committee Chair: Martin Wells

Area of Research: Correcting for misclassification/misdiagnosis in medical studies

Biography: Kim Hochstedler is a Ph.D. candidate in statistics. She received her M.S. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan in 2020 and graduated with her B.S. in statistics and psychology from Carnegie Mellon University in 2018. Her research involves developing statistical methods for misclassified outcome data in healthcare and criminal justice settings.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: The ice cream.

Second Place: Lidia Komondy, entomology doctoral candidate

Watch Lidia Komondy’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “Seeing is Believing, if You Know Where to Look”

Special Committee Chair: Brian Nault

Area of Research: Precision agriculture, insect vector ecology, integrated pest management

Biography: Lidia Komondy is a Ph.D. candidate in the field of entomology. Her research focuses on the vector ecology of insect-transmitted plant pathogens and the use of precision agricultural tools to solve modern problems in the ecological sciences. She hopes that her research will help alleviate the escalating challenges that growers are facing.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: The Big Red Barn!

Fangming Cui, psychology doctoral candidate

Watch Fangming Cui’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “An Upside to Disappointment in Close Relationships: Evidence for a Motivational, Relationship-Promoting Role”

Special Committee Chair: Vivian Zayas

Area of Research: Close relationships, emotion, motivation

Biography: Originally from China, Fangming is a Ph.D. candidate in psychology with an emphasis on social psychology. Her research mainly focuses on the downstream consequences of diverse emotional expressions in close relationships. She is fascinated with the idea of the “positivity of negativity,” wherein negative emotional expressions can, at times, exert positive relational outcomes.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: Taverna Banfi brunch and salads at the Terrace restaurant.

Sharada Gopal

Sharada Gopal, biomedical and biological sciences doctoral student

Watch Sharada Gopal’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “Worming Our Way Through a Longer Life”

Special Committee Chair: Siu Sylvia Lee

Area of Research: Aging

Biography: Sharada Gopal am a third-year graduate student in Dr. Sylvia Lee’s lab, where she studies the molecular mechanisms that regulate aging. Originally from Bangalore, India, Gopal came to Cornell for her master’s degree before transitioning to the BBS program to pursue a Ph.D. Beyond her research, she enjoys swimming in Ithaca’s picturesque lakes, singing, and cooking.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: The BBS community.

Yuexing Hao

Yuexing Hao, design and environmental analysis doctoral student

Watch Yuexing Hao’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “AI-Enhanced Patient-Centered Clinical Shared Decision-Making (SDM): A ‘Black Box’ Study with Older Adults”

Area of Research: Health intelligence, human-computer interaction

Biography: Yuexing Hao is a Ph.D. student in design and environmental analysis with a concentration in human centered design at Cornell University. She earned two computer science degrees from Rutgers University (B.A.) and Tufts University (M.S). Currently, her research focus is on health intelligence and human-computer interaction.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: P.E classes! I took ice hockey, squash, water skiing, and yoga, all of which were fantastic experiences.

Sangwoo Park, biophysics doctoral candidate

Watch Sangwoo Park’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “Sugar Barrier on the Cancer Cells”

Special Committee Chair: Matthew Paszek

Area of Research: Glycobiology, immunotherapy, biophysics

Biography: Sangwoo Park is from Changwon, South Korea. His current research focuses on developing new immunotherapies targeting the cancer cell glycocalyx. He has developed an optical microscopy method to understand the physical properties of glycocalyx. The ultimate goal of his research is to find treatment methods to eradicate cancers.

Favorite Thing About Cornell: Wineries and hiking.

Susannah Sharpless

Susannah Sharpless , English language and literature doctoral candidate

Watch Susannah Sharpless’s presentation .

Presentation Title: “How Did Maritime Trade Shape the Imaginations of American Women Writers?”

Special Committee Chair: Shirley Samuels

Area of Research: 19th-century American Literature

Biography: Susannah Sharpless is a Ph.D. candidate studying nineteenth-century literature. Her dissertation is titled, “‘Subtle Cargoes’: The Terraqueous Romantic in Nineteenth-Century Women’s Writing.”

2023 Final Round 3MT Competition

The live virtual Three Minute Thesis Competition Final Round took place at 3:00 pm ET on March 30, 2023. Eight finalists competed for first and second prize in the judging and People’s Choice Award winner. A post-event reception was held at the Big Red Barn starting at approximately 4:30 pm ET, and was open to the Cornell community and families and friends of the finalists and judges.

Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a competition to help doctoral students develop and showcase their research communication skills. Cornell’s 3MT challenges graduate students to present their dissertation as a compelling story in just three minutes, with one slide, in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Preliminary Round Events

  • All competitors submitted a recorded presentation of their talk by noon ET on Monday, March 13, 2023 in order to compete in the Preliminary Rounds that selected finalists.
  • We thank all of our wonderful preliminary round presenters for participation in the 2023 competition. Those who are still enrolled as doctoral students next year are welcome to enter the competition again.
  • Thank you also to our preliminary round judges, including Evelyn Ambríz, Merry Buckley, Anitra Douglas-McCarthy, Christine Holmes, Janna Lamey, Nathan Lindberg, Heidi Marshall, and Christian Miller.
  • Registration was opened from February – March 13, 2023, and an information was held on March 6. View the information session recording .
  • Need assistance recording your video submission? Timeslots were available on Thursday, March 9 to record your preliminary round video in the Big Red Barn greenhouse with the help of a Barn staff member. Recording equipment was provided.

If you should have questions or concerns regarding the 3MT Competition, please email us at:  [email protected]

Florida State University

FSU | The Graduate School

Main navigation Pulldown

The graduate school, three minute thesis (3mt™).

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT™) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland, Australia. The exercise develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills and supports the development of students' capacities to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to an intelligent but non-specialist audience.

Doctoral students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their dissertation topic and its significance. 3MT™ encourages students to consolidate their ideas and crystalize their research discoveries.

Congratulate the 2023 3MT Winners!

3mt thesis

1st Place:  Hyosoon Yim

Sport Management Promoting Sport Participation among Older Adults: Application of the Socioemotional Selectivity Theory

3mt thesis

2nd Place:  Tania Sultana

Biomedical Sciences ZIKV NS3 Drives Assembly of a Viroplasm-Like Structure (VLS)

3mt thesis

3rd Place:  Meng Tian

Communication The Stereotypes of Female eSports Players

3mt thesis

People's Choice:  John Akintola

Chemistry and Biochemistry Functional Polyelectrolyte Complexes

2023 3MT Competition Finalists!

3mt thesis

Sima Sabbagh

Neuroscience Unmasking the Architects of the Brain: Marvelous FMRP

3mt thesis

Art Education Art May Facilitate Community Building to Alleviate Chinese International Students' Alienation

3mt thesis

Andre Juliao

Condensed Matter Experimental Physics Nb3Sn for Axion Detection

3mt thesis

Hemant Goswami

Molecular Biophysics Development of an Ultrasensitive and Rapid Virus Detection Method Based on CRISPR-Cas Enzyme

3mt thesis

Toshiaki Kanai

Physics  Quantum Computer on Solid Neon 

3mt thesis

Qiushan Liu

Developmental Psychology Investigating Strategy Flexibility in Algebra

3mt thesis

Click here to read the FSU News Article

3mt thesis

Click here to see the 2023 3MT Competition Gallery

Your graduate research. 3 minutes. 1 slide.

Why Participate?

Skills development for research candidates Participating in 3MT develops academic, presentation and research communication skills, while developing research candidates’ ability to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

Building external relations for the university 3MT winners go on to represent FSU at regional and national competitions which provides an excellent networking and professional development opportunity. 

Are you eligible?

Currently enrolled doctoral students at Florida State University are eligible to participate in the 3MT™. 3MT® presentations must represent the primary research the student has conducted in their graduate program.

Master's students are not eligible.

What are the prizes?

  • 1st Place -  $1,000
  • 2nd Place -  $750
  • 3rd Place -  $500
  • People's Choice (selected by the audience): $250

What are the judging criteria?

At every level of the competition each competitor will be assessed on the judging criteria listed below. Each criterion is equally weighted and has an emphasis on audience.

Comprehension and content

  • Presentation provided clear background and significance to the research question
  • Presentation clearly described the research strategy/design and the results/findings of the research
  • Presentation clearly described the conclusions, outcomes and impact of the research

Engagement and communication

  • The oration was delivered clearly, and the language was appropriate for a non-specialist audience
  • The PowerPoint slide was well-defined and enhanced the presentation
  • The presenter conveyed enthusiasm for their research and captured and maintained the audience’s attention

What are the rules?

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted (no slide transitions, animations or 'movement' of any description), and the slide is to be presented from the beginning of the oration and remain in view for the duration of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum, and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • The decision of the judging panel is final.

Helpful Resources

  • Click here to view the Three Minute Thesis Virtual Competition Handbook.

3MT Recording/Editing Links

  • OpenShot Editing Video
  • Kapwing Website
  • 3MT Workshop Recording of Kapwing Editor: this video is a demonstration of the software
  • Kapwing Tutorial
  • FSU Canvas Support Center Tutorial : Best Practices for Student Video Production (iMovie and Movie Maker)
  • Vimeo Website

Past 3MT™ Competitions

3mt thesis

Fall 2023 3MT™

Doctoral student in Sport Management, Hyosoon Yim took first place at this year's 3MT competition and won $1,000. Read more .

3mt thesis

Fall 2022 3MT™

Doctoral student in Science Education, Dionne Wilson took first place at this year's 3MT competition and won $1,000. Read more .

3mt thesis

Fall 2021 3MT™

Doctoral student in Art Education, Chris Omni took first place at this year's 3MT competition and won $1,000.  Read more.

Fall 2020 3MT™

Mark Duslak (Educational Leadership & Policy Studies) and Matthew Martenson (Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences) finished first this year. Read more.

3mt thesis

Fall 2019 3MT™

Judges selected Alyssa Henderson (Physics)and Sara Jones (Biomedical Sciences) as this year’s first-place winners. Read more.

3mt thesis

Fall 2018 3MT™

Doctoral student in biological science, Eve Humphrey took first place at this year's 3MT competition and won $1,000. Read more.

3mt thesis

Fall 2017 3MT™

For the first time, a student from the College of Education, Shannon Gooden (Teacher Education), won the $1,000 prize. Read more.

3mt thesis

Fall 2016 3MT™

Madhuparna Roy (Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering)won first place in this year's competition. Read more.

3mt thesis

Fall 2015 3MT™

Aniket Ingrole (Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering) won first place in the 3MT™ competition. Read more.

3mt thesis

Fall 2014 3MT™

Kimberly Smith (Neuroscience) won first place in this year's 3MT™ competition. Read more.

View the past 3MT competition galleries

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  • Nov 21, 2022

How to write a winning 3MT script

That’s how many words are in a typical PhD thesis. Years of gruelling research, sleepless nights, and history-making breakthroughs… culminated into one VERY thick book. To present something of this scale would take you approximately 9 hours. 🤯

Scientist public speaking at a lectern in front of a giant book filled with text and graphs. Text reads: Thesis

But what do you do when you only have 3 minutes? ⏰

Well, that’s exactly what thousands of PhD students worldwide do each year in the 3 Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition. Not only do they explain their super complex research in the time it takes to make a coffee, but they do it in a way that can be understood by a non-specialist audience.

But we know what you’re thinking…

So, how do you even win a competition like that? Well first of all, you’re going to need a 3MT script. And we’re about to teach you how to write a WINNING one. 🏅

Not only that, but this blog post marks the beginning of a multi-part series that will cover all the important aspects of preparing a winning 3MT – from writing a captivating speech, to creating an effective slide, and of course, nailing your delivery.

What is the 3MT competition?

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition is an annual public speaking competition, where PhD candidates describe the impact and scope of their research in 3 minutes to a non-specialist audience. It was launched by the University of Queensland in 2008 and has since gained traction in over 85 countries around the world! 🌍

Put simply, it’s a fancy elevator pitch. Just imagine that it’s a really slow elevator.

Like any good competition, the 3MT has some rules. Here’s a run-down of some of the big ones:

Rules of the 3MT® competition:

You must use a single static PowerPoint slide with no transitions or animations.

You are limited to 3 minutes maximum. Competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.

Presentations are to be spoken word (e.g. no poems, raps or songs)… Sorry to all the aspiring rapper-researchers out there.

You can find a comprehensive list of the rules on the official UQ 3MT website.

Well, now that’s out of the way, let’s get into our tips on how to write a winning 3MT script! In this article, I’ll discuss some strategies that I used to craft my own winning 3MT script, but I’ve also watched lots of other award-winning 3MT presentations and identified some common features they share, so that you don’t have to. 😉

#1 : The hook 🪝

Every great 3MT presentation starts off with an attention-grabbing opener, otherwise known as ‘the hook.’ It’s a storytelling essential, and is undoubtedly one of the most important components of the 3MT script.

An orange fish looking enticingly at a worm on a fishing hook under water. The hook is tied to a label with text. Text reads: Attention Grabber.

One clever way to hook the audience in a 3MT presentation is to start off by asking a question , which creates a sense of open dialogue with the listener. For instance, these 3MT finalists began their presentations by asking:

Excerpts from 3MT examples. Text reads: “Did you grow up in a picture perfect family?” (Sarah Mokrzycki, 2021 Asia-Pacific Finalist, Victoria University) ”What does your breath say about you?” (Merryn Baker, 2022 Asia-Pacific Finalist, UNSW)

Full videos: Sarah Mokrzycki | Merryn Baker

You can see how the simple act of asking a question makes us reflect on our own personal views and encourages us to engage with the presentation. 💭 Another way to achieve a similar effect is to begin your talk by prompting the audience to act. An effective example of this is presented here:

Excerpt from 3MT example. Text reads: “I want you to tip your head back all the way… now swallow. It’s an uncomfortable, almost impossible feeling, isn’t it?” (Amanda Khamis, 2022 Asia-Pacific Runner Up, University of Sydney)

Full video: Amanda Khamis

Prompting the listener to act is a powerful way to immerse the audience into a particular scenario by making use of their senses. It can be easily achieved by asking the audience to look around the room, visualise a scene using their imagination, or simply taking a deep breath. 😮‍💨

Finally, several fantastic 3MT presentations also begin with a hook that startles the reader by making an unusual, interesting, or thought-provoking statement. This can be done numerous ways, such as through the use of:

Oxymoron: A figure of speech that combines two contradicting words (i.e., ‘deafening silence’ and ‘old news’).

Paradox: A self-contradictory statement that may actually be true (i.e., ‘less is more’).

Irony: Use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning (i.e., telling a rude customer to ‘have a nice day’).

Here are some good 3MT examples where the presenter has opened with a startling hook:

Excerpts from 3MT examples. Text reads: “The opposite of black is yellow.” (Sophie Jano, 2021, University of South Australia Runner-Up) ”I wonder why you’re listening, and what’s going to keep you listening for the next 2 minutes and 55 seconds of your life.” (Kylie Sturgess, 2020 Asia-Pacific Finalist, Murdoch University)

Full videos: Sophie Jano | Kylie Sturgess

The success of this technique arises from its element of surprise, which keeps the listener intrigued and curious. Basically, the more shocking or unexpected the hook, the better. 😲

However, with all this being said, there’s certainly no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ way to begin your 3MT, and that’s the beauty of creativity. But in case you’re stuck for ideas, here are a few sentence starters to give you some inspiration for creating a compelling hook for your 3MT script:

Sentence starter ideas for the 3MT Hook. Text reads: What if I told you… Think about the last time you… How many of you… Imagine that… Take a look at… Did you know…

Once you’ve got the crowd hooked, it’s a prime opportunity to reel them in for your story. 📖

#2 : Tell a story

An open book in front of a variety of scientific illustrations.

If you watch all the award-winning 3MT presentations, you’ll notice that they have one thing in common: they all tell a story. And they do it well.

But how do we turn our own complex, and often niche, research into a compelling story? Well, thankfully, we don’t have to reinvent the wheel. We can stand on the shoulders of SciComm giants... 👣

No one is more of an expert at the ins and outs of storytelling than Dr Randy Olson ; scientist-turned-filmmaker, and co-author of the book Connection: Hollywood Storytelling meets Critical Thinking ( a.k.a. our SciComm holy bible). Many of the principles discussed in this section come straight from this remarkable work, which made it to our top 5 must-read science communication books . 📚

As we know from pretty much every Hollywood blockbuster, all good stories have a beginning, middle, and end. In Connection , Randy further develops this idea by outlining what he calls the ‘ABT Template’, which stands for ‘And, But, Therefore.’ These represent the three key components that make up every good story. We’ve talked about the ABT template before , and how it can be used to elevate your storytelling. But, in case you missed it, I’ll use my own research as an example as we work through this concept.

Typically, in the beginning of a story, there’s some exposition. These are facts that help set the scene and ensure that the speaker and audience are all on the same page (pun intended). 😉 These facts can be connected using the word AND. For example:

“Cancer is deadly and traditional chemotherapy is one treatment option.”

Any statements we connect with ‘and’ are typically things that everyone would agree with, so you can quality-check your ‘and’ section by making sure you agree with all the facts you are connecting.

Okay, so we’ve set the scene. But this isn’t really a story yet, is it? The actual story doesn’t begin until there’s a source of tension or conflict , and the simplest word to make this happen is the word BUT:

“Cancer is deadly and traditional chemotherapy is one treatment option, but it comes with a lot of side effects.”

You can see that the ‘but’ is what makes things interesting. It’s what keeps the audience wanting more and makes them ask “Well, what happens next?”

It doesn’t have to be the word ‘but’ either – there are a lot of words that essentially do the same thing, such as however, although, except , and unfortunately, to name a few… (The thesaurus could be your best friend here). What these words have in common is that they create this critical sense of tension.

Following this, is the outcome , which is where the THEREFORE comes in.

“Cancer is deadly and chemotherapy is one treatment option, but it comes with a lot of side effects. Therefore , in our research, we load these drugs into tiny carriers called nanoparticles, which can help to reduce their adverse effects.”

‘Therefore’ is the word that brings everything together. It marks the beginning of a journey of discovery, which eventually leads to the resolution.

You can see how, by simply including these three key words: and, but and therefore , we have generated the foundations of a good story. Your 3MT script will obviously need to be longer than two sentences, but the ABT template provides a useful scaffold that you can build from to ensure that your story is compelling. If you’re interested in reading more on the ABT template and how it can be utilised, make sure to give Connection a read. 📖

To help you shape your story using the ABT template, here are some questions you can aim to answer in the beginning, middle, and end of your 3MT script:

A checkpoint roadmap for the 3MT structure according to the ABT Template, including question prompts.

Hopefully this outline can help you create a captivating and persuasive story to communicate your research effectively. Because, in the wise words of Dr Randy Olson, “Tell a good story and the whole world will listen.”

So, we’ve got our story. But what other strategies can we use to make it a little more interesting? Let’s unpack our storytelling toolkit to see how we can spice things up. 🌶

#3 : Your storytelling toolkit: analogies, humour & creation of a character

Top-down view of an open toolbox with three spanners inside, each labelled with bold text. Text reads: Analogies, Humour & Character

In addition to using the ABT template to write a compelling narrative structure, there are also several other tools that you can use to connect with your audience and make your story as easy to understand as possible.

One powerful way to do this is to relate your research to a more common experience by using an analogy . Analogies allow us to compare similarities between two seemingly different things. For instance, when I did the 3MT, I used an analogy to compare nanoparticles – a topic that’s not very common – to cars, something that almost everyone is familiar with:

Left: A blood vessel with an enlarged section to show a diagram of a drug-loaded nanoparticle. Right: A road with an enlarged image of passengers in the car.

Full video: Cintya Dharmayanti

As you can see, this works because the analogy serves to provide a simpler, more easily understood explanation using concepts and examples from everyday life. 🚗

Besides analogies, another useful tool to create a captivating story is the use of humour . Because who doesn’t like a good laugh, right? 😂 Comedic relief can help you create a bond with the listener and provide some emotional reprieve for what may otherwise be a serious presentation.

Humour is used well in this winning 3MT presentation:

Excerpt from 3MT example. Text reads: “Which is stronger: the land, or the sea? The sea of course! It has so many mussels.” (Trevyn Toone, 2022 Asia-Pacific Winner, University of Auckland)

Full video: Trevyn Toone

In this example, humour helps to keep us engaged with the presentation and gives us a good impression of the presenter. However, some care does need to be taken with the use of humour, so as to not devalue the presentation. Don’t worry if you’re not a comedian though (or if your research topics are too grim to joke about), there are still other effective ways to make your story shine.

Yellow caution sign with text. Text reads: CAUTION. Care must be taken with the use of humour in the 3MT.

Some of the most immersive 3MTs are those that introduce a character , fictional or not, and follow that character’s story. This is a particularly useful tool if your research involves a topic that strikes a strong emotional response. The following example executed this well, where the speaker refers to a photo of an adorable young infant with a feeding tube:

Excerpt from 3MT example. Text reads: “I bet you’re wondering who this little cutie is. This is James. James has cerebral palsy and dysphagia. My PhD is testing which treatments best help babies like James to eat and drink.” (Amanda Khamis, 2022 Asia-Pacific Runner-Up, University of Sydney)

This is so effective because it encourages us to empathise with the character and persuades us to see the importance of the presenter’s research. Whether it’s analogies, humour, or the creation of a character, there are lots of ways to make your story relatable and more easily understood.

Now that we’ve got some ideas from our storytelling toolkit, let’s move on! 🙌

#4 : Goodbye technical jargon 👋

Open trash can surrounded by flies and examples of technical jargon.

Imagine being in a different country, where you don’t speak the native language. You’re chatting with a local, but they can’t speak your language very fluently. The conversation is interspersed with foreign words that you can’t quite understand, so the meaning of the exchange ultimately becomes lost.

Confused woman surrounded by mathematical expressions meme..

That’s what it’s like trying to understand complex research when it’s filled with terminology and jargon only an expert in that field would know. 🤓

Remember that the 3MT is for a non-specialist audience, which is very different to a conference presentation that’s mostly filled with experts in the field. As scientists, it’s our job to make sure that we are speaking the same language as our audience, and for the 3MT, that means avoiding the use of language that’s too niche or technical. We can still explain complex concepts using language that’s easy to understand!

But how do you do that, when you’ve spent years in academia doing the opposite? 😅

The best way to avoid the overuse of jargon is to simply seek the help of a non-specialist. Ask someone that’s not in your field of research to listen to your presentation and provide feedback. Perhaps this is a friend, family, or fellow student from a completely different department. Does your story make sense to them? If not, it probably won’t make sense to many people in the 3MT audience.

I remember when I was preparing my 3MT script, I went through this exact process! Reading it aloud to my mum, sister, and pretty much anyone who would listen, to make sure each sentence was easy to follow and understand. It’s actually what helped me come up with the idea of the car- analogy in the first place! So, keep iterating and tweaking your presentation until it makes sense to the mailman, the bus driver, and the neighbour down the road.

Also, make sure to keep your story focused on the big picture, rather than getting bogged down in the details and data. Not only will this make your presentation hard to understand, but it’s also more likely to make it B.O.R.I.N.G. and lead to blank stares !

When you’ve ticked all these boxes – great! You’re ready to move on.

#5 : The finisher: Coming full circle

Good job! You’re almost done. Time to add the finishing touch. We can all agree that a strong finish makes for a more memorable presentation. One trend that’s very common amongst winning 3MT presentations is the way that they finish: by bringing their story full circle. As the name suggests, this essentially means that the presenter refers back to the beginning of the story, especially if a particular character, scenario, or analogy is used.

A circular diagram describing the 3MT story structure.

For instance, in this winning 3MT example, the presentation begins with:

Excerpt from 3MT example. Text reads: “I love the moon. Wouldn’t it be cool to live there? I want to build a house, with a deck, and a decent view… the Earth.”

Then, as the presentation comes to a close, the final segment ends by referring back to the opening sentence:

Excerpt from 3MT example. Text reads: “So… next time you’re out at night, I want you to look for the. moon. It’s normally up,  sometimes slightly sideways, and just think about what you’re seeing… Think about the intense sunlight up there, the lack of air, the vacuum… and the fact that despite those things, maybe we could live there. Maybe in a house, maybe with a deck, with what is, let’s be honest, a pretty awesome view.” (Matthew Shaw, 2021 Asia-Pacific Winner, Swinburne University of Technology

Full video: Matthew Shaw

By bringing the story full circle, the audience gains a sense of satisfaction and closure as the cycle returns to its beginnings and the status quo is restored.

Take-away messages

The thought of distilling years of research down to just 3 minutes can be daunting, especially when it’s a competition. 😰 However, if you:

Create an attention-grabbing hook

Tell a captivating story using the ABT template

Use tools such as analogies, humour, and characters

Get rid of technical jargon, and

Bring your story full circle

You’re well on your way to writing a fantastic 3MT script! So, what are you waiting for? Let’s tell your story. Time is ticking. 😉⏰

And remember – if you want to further master your storytelling and public speaking skills, we’d love to show you how in one of our online or in-person science communication workshops .

Feel free to contact us to find out more!

Cintya Dharmayanti

Dr Juan Miguel Balbin

Dr Tullio Rossi

Illustration

Alvin Yanga

3mt thesis

Related Posts

What does it mean to be a science communicator?

5 tips for improving your public speaking skills as a researcher

How to write effective analogies for communicating research

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How to Design an Award-Winning Scientific Poster - Animate Your Science Online Course

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Penn Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

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Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a competition for doctoral and research students to develop and showcase their research communication skills through brief, 3-minute presentations.

Penn's annual 3MT competition is sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Education, with co-sponsorship and support from Career Services, the Graduate Student Center, and GAPSA. 

Penn 3MT is a University-sponsored speaking competition designed to showcase graduate student research in three-minute talks to a general audience. This is a terrific opportunity for graduate students engaged in substantive original research to develop communication skills and share their work with faculty, students, and staff from across the University.

  • 3MT Information Sessions : November 2023 & January 2024
  • Research Communications Workshops : October - November 2023 &  February 2024 (optional)
  • Practice and Feedback Sessions: February 2024 (optional)
  • First Round Video Submissions Due: Saturday, March 2, 2024
  • Finalists announced: March 7-8, 2024
  • Finalist Feedback Sessions: March 8-21, 2024
  • In-person Competition : Friday, March 22, 2024

In addition to bragging rights, a prize of $1000 will be awarded to the first-place winner and $500 to both the second-place and audience choice winners. Winners will also have the opportunity to participate in regional and national 3 Minute Thesis competitions!

Meet the Finalists & Winners!

First place, $1000, kritika jha.

Kritika is a material chemistry Ph.D. student at the SAS and has dedicated her research to sustainable and intelligent packaging solutions. She is also a great fan of cooking, so she’s always cooking up a storm both in the lab and the kitchen,  with a mission to whip up eco-friendly packaging solutions. So, just think of her as a chef-scientist, where her ingredients aren't just spices and veggies, but also the stuff that could make tomorrow's packaging as compostable as an apple core, with a sprinkle of creativity and a dash of science. Now she’s going to tell you more about all that in her talk title “Nanosuperheroes: Who Can See the Unseen Dangers” 

Second Place, $500, Grace Simon

Grace is a PhD Candidate in the Management Department. Before embarking on her PhD journey, Grace spent five years working in the financial services industry. From supporting employees through bank robberies to leading a crisis communications team during the pandemic, Grace realized the central role of emotions in the workplace. In her research, she explores when and why supportive intentions at work can go right and wrong.  When she's not working on research, you can find her searching for the best ice cream in Philadelphia or perfecting her soft pretzel recipe. Now she’s going to tell you about her research in her talk titled “Putting Feelings into Words” 

Audience Choice, $500, Talayah Johnson

Talayah is Bioengineering Ph.D. student here at the University of Pennsylvania. Her journey started at Penn State University where she received her B.S in biology and Masters in biomechanics. Outside of research she enjoys volunteering at Philadelphia high schools as a way of encouraging minority students to pursue STEM degrees.  Now she’s going to tell you about her research in her talk titled “The Tendon’s Achilles Heel: How Reduced Loading Affects Limb Growth” 

Shelvey Swett

Shelvey is a second year PhD student in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering department. Her work focuses on carbon capture and storage. Outside of research, Shelvey loves reading, watching video essays, and doing hot yoga. Now she’s going to tell you about her research in her talk titled ‘Carbon capture? I hardly know her! Critical Mineral Supply and Carbon Dioxide Storage from Mining Waste’ 

Maya Moritz

Maya is a PhD student in the Criminology department at Penn. She grew up in New Jersey and studied labor and historical economics in Scotland, Canada, and Germany. During her studies, she listened to way too many true crime podcasts and, as a result, decided to return home and examine a different labor market- crime. As a PhD student in criminology she tries to keep her work on the brighter side by studying the crime-fighting effects of art, lighting, and the power of community. Now she’s going to tell you about her research in her talk titled “A Picture Worth A Thousand Words: The Effects of Murals on Crime ” 

Chris Johnson

Chris is a doctoral candidate in chemical and biomolecular engineering, with a focus on deciphering the physics behind new materials for energy technology. He has had work published in scientific journals such as Polymer, Advanced Materials Interfaces, and Chemical Communications. He was the 2020 winner of the Elda Wollaeger Gregory poetry award at the University of Delaware, and spends his free time playing with his cat Poe. Now he’s going to tell you about his research in his talk titled “Mission Ion-possible Charges in Motion" 

Natalia (Nati) Aponte Borges

Natalia is a graduate researcher, bilingual STEM educator, and artist. She obtained her B.S. in Biology from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras and is currently a Biology PhD Candidate in the Schmidt Lab. She is broadly interested in the neurobiology of behavior, known as neuroethology. Her work focuses on the neural mechanisms that control courtship behaviors in songbirds. She studies brown-headed cowbirds, which have an elaborate song and display during courtship. Outside of research, she is passionate about community, science literacy, disability justice, and teaching. Along with birds, she loves photography, sewing, and going to the beach. Now she’s going to tell you about her research in her talk titled “The Neural Command of Courtship: How the Bird Brain Orchestrates an Elaborate Wingspread” 

Pulkit Khandelwal

Pulkit is a 5th year PhD student in the department of Bioengineering. Previously, he completed his masters in computer science at McGill University in Montreal. Pulkit's research interests lie in biomedical image analysis using artificial intelligence and shape analysis to understand how neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, spread in the brain using postmortem human brain MRI. In his spare time, he likes to read poetry, literature, listen to Greek mythology podcasts, nerd out on coffee, enjoy foreign language independent movies, and lately he has been interested in rare books and book binding! Now he’s going to tell you about his research in his talk titled “Alzheimer's disease: cutting the brain open, literally!” 

To enter, students must register below and submit a video of their three-minute talk to Penn 3MT (details below) by Saturday, March 2. From those first-round submissions, up to 10 finalists will be chosen to compete in the campus-wide, live competition on Friday, March 22.

Register for Round 1 Video Submission

The 3MT competition will teach you how to communicate effectively to specialists and non-specialists alike, preparing you to present your research at scholarly conferences and to take part in both academic and professional job markets.

Professional Development:  Penn 3MT is a great opportunity for graduate students to practice sharing their original research to general audiences. Participants have the opportunity to attend workshops and receive group and one-on-one coaching to  develop oratorical skills, dynamic deliveries, and compelling content  when presenting their academic research.

Networking:  3MT participants will have an opportunity to meet and engage with new faculty, staff, and students from across the University.

Impact:  Participants have the opportunity to make the importance and relevance of their research visible to a non-specialist audience. Participants can elect to have their presentation shared online, promoting both your own work and the value of graduate student research to a much wider audience.

Prizes:  Everyone who submits a video will receive prizes from GAPSA and the Grad Center! Please register at the blue button at the top of the page  if you plan on submitting a video so we can collect your contact information. Judges will select a first-place ($1000) and second-place ($500) winner at the live competition. There will also be an audience choice ($500) winner.

Active PhD, Professional Doctorate Research (program composed of at least 2/3 research and eligible for Research Training Program (RTP)), and full-time Masters candidates who have successfully passed their confirmation milestone (including candidates whose thesis is under submission) by the date of their first presentation are eligible to participate in 3MT competitions at all levels. Graduates are not eligible.

Please Note : Students enrolled in any of the following programs are not eligible to enter the 3MT Competition:

Professional Masters

Professional Doctorate (less than 2/3 research)

Entries from all disciplines are welcome and encouraged.

In cases of presentation of a collaborative research project, the presenter’s contribution to the project must be salient and clearly specified.

If you are unsure of your eligibility or would like more information about 3MT, please contact [email protected] . You can also check the Graduate Catalog for your Penn School to see if your program is listed under the PhD and Research Master's Programs.

To enter, you must submit a three-minute video of your presentation by 11:59 p.m. (local time) on March 2, 2024.

Please register at the blue button at the top of the page  if you are interested in participating . Be sure to read through the Rules and Guidelines also before submitting your videos!

Competition Process

Students may submit their slide and video anytime before Saturday, March 2, 2024  for feedback. You can also request a 1:1 session during this time for immediate feedback or to go over your presentation with the Associate Director.

Research Communications Workshops offered by the Graduate Student Center will occur October - November and January - February. See our Events page for details.

Student videos submitted by the deadline of  Satur day, March 2 at 11:59 p.m., EST  are reviewed by a panel of staff for compliance with the eligibility requirements.

10 Finalists are selected for the online competition by March 7-8, 2024.

A  campus-wide competition between the finalists will be held March 22, 2024. A reception will be held after the competition.

On the basis of these presentations, winners will be selected by the panel of judges and a “people’s choice” by audience members.  

Judging and Selection

A panel of non-specialist faculty and staff judges will evaluate student presentations. Presentations will be evaluated based on clarity, comprehension, content, engagement, and communication.

Everyone who submits a video will receive a gift for participating! Please fill out the interest form above if you plan on submitting a video so we can collect your contact information. Judges will select a first ($1000) and second-place ($500) winner at the live competition. There will also be an audience choice ($500) winner.

All decisions of the judging panel are final.

Video submission:   

  • Your video and slide should be submitted using the button below.  Please register at the blue button at the top of the page  if you are interested in participating .
  • All video files should be named: “Title_of_talk.mp4” or “Title_of_talk.mov”.  Please do not include your name or any other identifying information in the name of the video file.
  • You do not need to include your slide in your video. A video of you speaking is enough. You will upload your slide alongside your video.
  • At the very beginning of your video, please state your full name, graduate program, and the title of your presentation. The time it takes to do this will not be counted against the three minutes to present your research.
  • You will not be judged on your skills as a videographer, and you do not need to use professional video equipment. As long as the judges can see you and the audio is clear and understandable, that is sufficient. You can record yourself using the Panopto interface in Canvas. You can also record yourself in Zoom. You may ask a friend or colleague for help creating your video, or you can get assistance and borrow equipment from the Vitale Digital Media Lab . You can also follow these tips for recording a presentation in Zoom . Here is one demonstrated on a Mac .

Visual submission :

  • Presenters may use a single image or static PowerPoint slide (no Prezi or other presentation formats) to enhance their presentation.
  • Students must create their slides themselves – they cannot ask someone else to design the slides. Use of PowerPoint templates is allowed.
  • Slides can include visual elements (charts, visualizations, photos, clip art, etc.) created by someone other than the student, as long as the slide credits the original creator.
  • Embedded audio, animations, and/or video clips (including but not limited to .gif, .avi, .mp4, .mp3, and .wmv file types) are NOT permitted.
  • Powerpoint slides should be named "Title_of_talk.ppt". Please do not include your name or any other identifying information in the name of the PowerPoint file.

Powerpoint slides and videos can be uploaded below. If you are having difficulty, please upload it to Microsoft, Box, or Google Drive and email jomcb at upenn.edu the link to download.

Upload Your Video & Slide

Length and Timing: Presentations should be a maximum of three (3) minutes in length, commencing from the moment the speaker starts the presentation through movement or speech.

  • The presentation  begins  at the moment the speaker engages with the audience (if they start with a hand clap, a gesture, or any other such engagement, prior to speaking, the clock begins at that time; if there is no such engagement the clock starts when the student begins speaking).
  • If the speaker continues past three minutes, points will be deducted from the final score, beginning with one point at 3:03, and one point every two additional seconds thereafter.
  • No props of any kind are permitted, and notes cannot be used during the presentation.

Want some help getting started? In need of Inspiration? Check out the resources below!

3MT® Resources

  • Three-Minute Thesis Showcase :  Watch winning 3MT presentations from around the world.
  • Three Tips to Help You Prepare a Winning Presentation
  • 3MT: The Three Most Common Mistakes
  • Sample 3MT Coaching Session

Past Penn 3MT ® Competitions and Workshops

Research Communications Workshops

Additional Resources

  • Nature MasterClass: Effective Science Communication (PennKey login required)
  • Alda Center for Communicating Science Creating Connections Workbook
  • XKCD Simple Writer
  • Dejargonizer
  • TED Talks :  Short talks on “ideas worth spreading.” 
  • PhD Comics Two-Minute Thesis  Competition
  • Berkeley Grad Slam Competition

Graduate Student Center University of Pennsylvania 3615 Locust Walk Philadelphia PA 19104 215-746-6868

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3MT - 3 Minute Thesis

University 3MT Participants

2024 3MT University Competition Participants

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is a research presentation competition that originated at the University of Queensland in 2008. Since then, the program has spread to universities worldwide. Students participating in the 3MT competition have three minutes to give an oral presentation based on their research. The presentation should avoid discipline-specific jargon and be presented so a lay audience can understand the significance of the research. 

Competitions are held in graduate departments and at the college level to determine which graduate student will advance to the university-wide competition. The competitor who wins first place will receive $2,000, second place will receive $1,500, third place will receive $1,000, and the Presenter's choice will win $500. The remaining participants will each receive $250.

For video examples of past 3MT presentations, visit the official 3MT website .

The following are the competition rules as given directly from 3MT:

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted. No slide transitions, animations, or 'movement' of any description are allowed. The slide is to be presented from the beginning of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to a maximum of 3 minutes and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (eg. no poems, raps, or songs).
  • Presentations are to commence from the stage.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through either movement or speech.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

For a complete list of rules and more information on judging criteria, please visit the 3MT website .

Congratulations to the winners from our 2024 3MT Event!

Jared Steele Life Sciences Leveraging SuperShoe Technology for Clinical Care 1 st place winner

Luke Taylor Engineering Improving Medical Capsule Localization 2 nd place winner

Khiara Cardoza Family, Home, and Social Sciences Exploring Gender Differences in Infertility 3 rd place winner and Presenter's Choice

2024 3MT University Competition Winners

2024 3MT Winners

How do we get kids to eat their vegetables? Mayra Hernandez attempted to answer this age-old question in her research. Her research focused on finding ways to increase vegetable consumption in school meals in kids ages 7- 13 years old. Her approach was to use potatoes, either season diced potatoes or Potato Smiles and and combine them with vegetables in either the same or separate bows. The results? When kids were served vegetables in the same bowl as as Potato Smiles, overall vegetable consumption increased. Therefore we may be getting closer to helping children eat more of their vegetables and help them meet their nutritional needs so that kids may grow physically, in strength, in knowledge and in helping them prepare for a bright future ahead of them.

Even though inhaled corticosteroids (like rescue inhalers used to treat asthma) are known to cause voice disorders in otherwise vocally healthy individuals, it is unknown whether those damaging effects can be reversed by taking a break from treatment. In our study, we investigated the reversibility of these negative vocal effects by exposing 18 white New Zealand rabbits to inhaled corticosteroid treatment. We compared the aerodynamic measures of rabbit vocal folds given a recovery period to rabbits vocal folds tested directly following treatment. Excitingly, the results showed vocal improvement in the rabbit groups afforded a recovery period, thus providing preliminary evidence that the damaging vocal effects of inhaled corticosteroids are, indeed, reversible.

"Tremor affects millions of people, many of whom are not satisfied with current front-line treatment options. New suppression techniques that focus on suppressing tremor at the muscle or joint level are becoming available, but we don't currently know which muscle most contributes to someone's arm tremor. My research aims to answer this question by measuring the electrical signal in the muscles and the motion of the joints and hand in tremor patients. Using a frequency-dependent correlation between muscle activations and joint movement, we can start to get an idea of which muscles are most responsible for tremor. Initial findings point toward elbow flexors (like your biceps) and wrist extensors as being most likely to contribute to tremor. Additionally, I am using this same data to validate a mathematical model of the upper-limb. Once validated, the model can also answer the question of which muscles are most responsible for tremor and why, as well as provide insight into new suppression sites or techniques, such as physical therapy. With the knowledge gained from my research, existing suppression methods can be optimized with minimal side effects, giving tremor patients the freedom to perform daily tasks that we take for granted."

Though black boards and white boards have been a fundamental tool in the classroom for over a century, little research has been done on how to best design and present information using these boards. My study takes visual design principles and applies them to boardwork in a mathematics classroom to better organize and clarify the content. This research shows that students notice boardwork, have strong opinions on what makes boardwork good, and that the application of design principles on boards has a significant impact on students and the teacher. Students felt their cognitive load was lightened and that they were receiving higher quality instruction and the teacher felt that using the design principles during the planning stages of the lesson reduced their cognitive load while teaching. Findings from this study can inform teachers on best practices for organizing their boardwork, serve as a template for professional development workshops, and inform curriculum for pre-service teacher education programs.

Finances remain a key struggle for couples in romantic relationships. This research explored the way in which individuals were taught by parents about money and how that impacts their feelings of capability with managing money. In addition, this research looked at how people's feelings of capability with money impacts their financial communication in romantic relationships. Findings showed that knowing better helps us do better.

Are you willing to take a risk to outperform your peers? I look at the interaction of prospect theory's loss aversion effect and social comparison bias. Loss aversion tells us that individuals on average are unwilling to incur potential losses even when an equal potential gain is associated. I predict individuals will be willing to take on more risk when their performance is compared against that of their peers.

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Three Minute Thesis Competition: Start

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3mt thesis

2024 3MT Competition

Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an internationally recognized competition that challenges Ph.D students to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance in just 3 minutes, in language that anyone can understand. 3MT is not an exercise in trivializing or ‘dumbing-down’ research but requires students to consolidate their ideas, crystallize their research discoveries and capture the imagination of their audience.

Who's Eligible to Compete? All CMU Ph.D Students regardless of year in program. Whether it's your first year or last year, Come one - come all!

Why Compete? 3MT offers CMU doctoral candidates of any level the opportunity to gain early career recognition, connect with the campus community, and win prizes of up to $3,000. It's a great way to practice sharing your research with a non specialist audience and get listeners excited about your area of study. Students get to hear from fellow Ph.D. students across campus, which can spark interdisciplinary collaboration. They also get to present before staff, faculty, and alumni from a wide range of departments, as well as an extensive alumni network. Preliminary round winners receive $250 cash.

What Happens Next? Start practicing! All 3MT registrants will be scheduled to compete in preliminary rounds between January and February.

Then What? Winners of preliminary rounds go on to compete in-person in the CMU 3MT Championship, on Thursday, March 14, 2024 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm EST. Finalists will compete for an additional $500-$3,000 in cash prizes in the Three Minute Thesis Championship. Prizes are given for 1st ($3,000), 2nd ($2,000), and 3rd ($1,000) as well as the live audience-votes for People's Choice ($500) and virtual-vote for the Alumni Award ($750).

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  • Last Updated: Mar 20, 2024 3:43 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.cmu.edu/3mt

Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia.  While the original competition was for graduate students, a number of colleges are now sponsoring undergraduate competitions. The Writing Center sponsored Harvard's first undergraduate Three-Minute Thesis competition in April 2019. 3MT offers seniors the opportunity to create an accessible and interesting presentation of their senior thesis research for an audience of non-specialists. All finalists were offered the opportunity to work with a writing tutor and a public speaking tutor to craft their final presentations.

If you are a senior interested in entering this year's 3MT, you can find information on this page.  

First Prize

Meera Nair (MCB): ""M2 Macrophages: The Bodyguards of Metastasis."  (video unavailable)

Second Prize

Harrison Ngue (Biomedical Engineering): ""Beating Cancer Twice: Understanding How "Sleeping" Cancer Cells Become Resistant to Chemotherapy

Third Prize

Nour Khachemoune, "Animals, Diet, and Societal Collapse at the Maya Site of Copán, Honduras"

Alison Chen (Philosophy/History) "Where Mind Meets Body: Descartes on Knowledge in Everyday Life"

Yousuf Amiel Bakshi (Government): "Block to the Future: Understanding Why Certain Countries Use Blockchain for e-Government"

Henry Cerbone (Ontology of Autonomous Systems): "Running on Water: A Multi-Disciplinary Look at Basilisk Lizards"

Nikhil Dharmaraj (History and Literature/Comp Sci): "System Update: Historicizing Facial Recognition Technology in Hindutva India"

Laura Murphy (English): "The 1918 Influenza Pandemic: Fiction, Journalism, and Personal Journals of the Plague"

Jeromel Dela Rosa Lara (Social Anthropology/Comparative Religion): "Smugglers of Faith": The Enduring Presence of Filipina Migrant Domestic Workers in the Middle East"

Isha Puri (Applied Mathematics): "Shifting Paradigms of AI Explainability and Reasoning"

Sam Saba (NELC/Government): "Digitalization & Divide: Global Divides in the Digital Age"

Aristotle Vainikos (Government): "Thinking Outside the Disciplinary Box: The Role of Designers in Military Technology Innovation"

Michael Wallace (History): "How the National Park Service Created Environmentalism"

Zoe Weiss (Molecular and Cellular Biology): "RNA in a Haystack"

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Graduate School Updates>

The latest COVID-19 news and information is available at  Penn State's Coronavirus Information website . 

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update

On March 11 th  the University announced that beginning March 16 th  instruction for all students will be moving to a remote delivery format. Graduate students enrolled in resident courses should plan on participating remotely, and not coming to campus specifically for face-to-face instruction. Learn more at gradschool.psu.edu/covid19 .

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Three Minute Thesis

  •  /  Career and Professional Development
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three minute thesis logo

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an academic research communication competition developed by the University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. Through the competition, graduate and professional students can hone their academic and research presentation skills and their ability to effectively explain their research to a general audience. Each competitor has three minutes to speak and can use only one presentation slide.

The Graduate School will be hosting the 2024 Three Minute Thesis competition in partnership with the Graduate and Professional Student Association and the Graduate School Alumni Society .

Watch the Final Round

3MT at Penn State in 2024 

Penn State’s first University-wide 3MT Competition will take place over two rounds. To compete, graduate students must upload a video presentation during the submission period (January 8–February 9) and be available for the final, in-person round on Saturday, March 23, on the University Park campus.

Competitor Information

Learn more about eligibility requirements, the upcoming timeline, prize money, and more.

Judge Information

Learn about remote judging for the opening round, who can be a judge, judging criteria, and more.

Essex Three Minute Thesis competition

Prizes 

  • First Place: $1,000
  • Second Place: $500
  • People's Choice: $500

Competition Format

Opening Round — Video Format expand_more

Open call to any Penn State graduate or professional student conducting research to submit three-minute videos. Submissions will be judged by alumni, graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, faculty, staff, and others. The top 10 students get invited to the final round as well as a free lunch at Penn State’s annual Doctoral Alumni Recognition Luncheon hosted by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Final Round — In-Person Format expand_more

Saturday, March 23  10:00-11:15 a.m.  Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center 

The final round will be live streamed from the University Park campus and will include a people’s choice prize selected by virtual and in-person audience ballots. Winners will be announced shortly after the competition.

Regional and National Competitions expand_more

The top-scoring Ph.D. student from Penn State’s final round will be invited to the regional 3MT competition hosted by the Northeast Association of Graduate Schools in April 2024 (exact date to be determined). Winners of the regional competition are invited to the national competition hosted by the Council of Graduate Schools. Students in master's and professional degree programs are eligible to participate in Penn State's competition but are not eligible for the regional or national competitions.

Why participate?

Megan Rossi, past 3MT winner at the University of Queensland, discusses how the 3MT competition helped her career.

Contact  

Direct all questions about Three Minute Thesis at Penn State to: [email protected] .  

Three Minute Thesis, Graduate Exhibition, or Both?

In spring 2024, Penn State graduate students can participate in two major research and scholarship communication events, the Three Minute Thesis and the  Graduate Exhibition . Students are welcome to participate in both but should be aware that each event has its own application process and deadlines.

Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

Can you explain your research in three minutes?

The UND Three Minute Thesis (3MT) celebrates research being done by students at the University of North Dakota. The competition culminates students' academic, presentation and research communication skills, as each must effectively explain their research in three minutes with only one PowerPoint slide.

Three Minute Thesis Competition

January 31, 2024 | Memorial Union Ballroom, Room 214D

  • Preliminary Round 1: 8:30 a.m.
  • Preliminary Round 2: 10 a.m.
  • Preliminary Round 3: 11:30 a.m.
  • Final Round: 2 p.m. |  Awards ceremony to follow, refreshments will be served.

Guests may attend all or parts of the program as their schedules allow. Please arrive for the start of a round. Guest will not be permitted to enter the room during a presentation. The program will be livestreamed via Zoom webinar. Registration required to obtain livestream link. 

WATCH LIVESTREAM RECORDING HERE

3MT logo

About the Competition

The 3MT competition is based on the rules and guidelines set forth by the University of Queensland, 3MT's founding institution.

  • Students will compete in a preliminary round with no more than 10 students per heat (the final number of students per heat will depend on the total number of participants). The top two from each heat will move on to the Finals.
  • The finalists from the preliminary competition will compete again in the final round. Judges will select First, Second, and Third Place winners.
  • This year's overall winner (first place) will continue on to the regional competition hosted by the Western Association of Graduate Schools in March 2024. 

Scholarships

  • $750 | First Place In addition, this year’s first place winner will continue on to compete in the regional competition hosted by the Western Association of Graduate Schools.
  • $500 | Second Place
  • $250 | Third Place

Nominate a Student

Students must be nominated by their graduate program director to participate. All nominated students must be in the final stages of their degree, with a graduation date set for May, August, or December of 2024.

Ian Foerster

Ian Foerster, who won UND's 2018 competition, took first place at the regional 3MT competition in Las Vegas, Nev. 

Three Minute Thesis Rules

  • Spoken word
  • Three minutes or less
  • Movement/gestures
  • Formal/professional clothing
  • Commence from the stage
  • A single static PowerPoint

Not Permitted (Will Disqualify)

  • Exceeding three minutes
  • Poems, raps or songs
  • Props (pointers, instruments, lab equipment, costumes)
  • Slide transitions, animations, sound, or video
  • No additional electronic media are permitted within the recording (e.g. sound and video files)

Presentations commence when the presenter begins through movement or speech. The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

Three Minute Thesis Judging

Each competitor will be assessed by three to five judges balanced by age, gender, academic/professional positions, and discipline. Judges may not participate in scoring for one of the heats when there is a conflict of interest, including 1) knowing one of the competitors, or, 2) having expertise in one of the presented topics

Judging Criteria

Judging will focus on the presentation, ability to communicate research to a non-specialist audience, and 3MT PowerPoint slide.

Comprehension and Content

Engagement and communication, comprehension and content ( open this section).

Did the presenter:

  • Provide an understanding of the background to the research and its significance?
  • Clearly describe the key results of the research including conclusions and outcomes?
  • Follow a clear and logical sequence?
  • Communicate in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience (for thesis topic, key results and research significance and outcomes)?
  • Avoid jargon, explain terminology, and provide adequate background info to illustrate points?
  • Spend adequate time on each presentation element - or was it too long on one aspect or was it rushed?

Engagement and Communication ( Open this section)

  • Make the audience want to know more?
  • Take care not to trivialize or generalize their research?
  • Convey enthusiasm for their research?
  • Capture and maintain their audience’s attention?
  • Have sufficient stage presence, eye contact and vocal range; maintain a steady pace, and have a confident stance?
  • Have a slide that enhanced the presentation – was it clear, legible, and concise?

Competitors

2024 ( open this section), 2024 winners.

  • The Future of EVs is LESS COBALT!
  • Effects of Feedback on Eyewitness Accuracy
  • Predicting Disease Spread in Deer

2024 Competitors

  • Mansurat Abdulmalik Ali, Environmental Engineering
  • Monique Anair, Educational Practice & Leadership
  • Kaden Bollinger, Forensic Psychology
  • Sarah Daman, Biology
  • Alireza Hasani, Civil Engineering
  • Jacob Haugen, Biomedical Sciences
  • Eberechi Ichi, Civil Engineering
  • Temitayo Ikuerowo, Energy Engineering
  • Violet Ingeborg, English
  • Shereen Ismail, Computer Science
  • Ann Landreville, Occupational Therapy, Grand Forks Campus
  • Anne Marques Catarin, Music Education
  • Victor Moreno Lozano, Biomedical Engineering
  • Michelle Pahlen, Public Administration
  • Tiffany Sonterre, Communication
  • Caleb Strom, Aerospace Sciences
  • Wen Sun, Chemistry
  • Musabbir Talukder, Chemical Engineering
  • Glavic Tikeri, Chemical Engineering
  • Makayla Tucker, Occupational Therapy, Casper WY Campus
  • Danielle Villano, Teaching & Leadership
  • Sierra Ward, Chemistry

2023 ( Open this section)

2023 winners.

  • Food for Thought: Depression, Food Allergy, and the Histamine Hypothesis
  • How does soil bacteria change during grassland restoration?
  • The El Nino Southern Oscillation & Climate Change in the Northern Great Plains

2023 Competitors

  • Moones Alamooti, Energy Engineering
  • Hussain Almalki, Communication
  • Samuel Amendolar, English
  • Zinat Ara, Geography
  • Gbolahan Bamgbose, Biomedical Sciences
  • Hyunsuk Choi, Mechanical Engineering
  • James Cooley, Aerospace Sciences
  • Taylor Dolan, Atmospheric Science
  • Chrys Folden, Communication
  • Danielle Germundson-Hermanson, Clinical and Translational Science
  • Cody Ingle, Public Health
  • Hyungwoo Jo, Higher Education
  • Sierra Johnson, Public Administration
  • Lydia Kantonen, Biology
  • Shabaz Khan, Energy Engineering
  • Ahmed Essam Hassan Mohammed, Chemical Engineering
  • Jaya Preethi Mohan, Computer Science
  • Duncan Oteki, Civil Engineering
  • Hadjar Ould Slimane, Electrical Engineering
  • Devarshi Patel, Data Science
  • Danielle Piggott, Clinical Psychology
  • Dario Schor, Aerospace Sciences
  • Joseph Useldinger-Hoefs, Civil Engineering
  • Xin Zhang, Chemical Engineering

2022 ( Open this section)

2022 winners .

  • Preventing falls in Parkinson's disease 
  • Oxygen vs. Salt: A scientific fight  
  • Water under the bridge! 

2022 Competitors

  • Rijana Adhikari, Applied Economics & Predictive Analysis
  • Lotfi Allam, Petroleum Engineering
  • Vida Atashi, Civil Engineering
  • Abelmalek Bellal, Energy Engineering
  • Cody Boyle, Biomedical Sciences
  • Simon Cohn, Petroleum Engineering
  • Maharshi Dey, Mechanical Engineering
  • Rabie Fadil, Biomedical Engineering
  • Emily Gibbens-Buteau, Communication
  • Kaylee Husarik, Biomedical Engineering
  • Madison Jochim, Biomedical Sciences
  • Zachary Meduna, Chemical Engineering
  • Dominic Nkemngong, Chemistry
  • Jessica Passini, Public Health Program
  • James Sullivan, Civil Engineering

Competition Recording

2021 ( Open this section)

2021 winners.

  • 1st place: Nidhal Badrouchi, Petroleum Engineering
  • 2nd place: Pavan Challa, Civil Engineering
  • 3rd place:  Regan Lawrence, Biomedical Sciences

2021 Competitors

Tyler Achatz, Biology - FINALIST

Connecting the spots: revealing the true diversity of parasites causing "black spots" on fish

Moones Alamooti, Geology and Geological Engineering

How to Survive North Dakota Winters?

Youness Arjoune, Electrical Engineering

It's Jamming Time

Nidhal Badrouchi, Petroleum Engineering - 1st PLACE

Green Gain Solution: Reversing the impact of CO2 on the planet

Pavan Challa, Civil Engineering - 2ND PLACE

Destruction of "Forever" Chemicals

Amrita Chatterjee, Computer Science

Uncertainty Resilient Cyber-Physical Systems

Justin Germann, Space Studies

Understanding Solar System Formation Through Asteroid Reflections

Regan Lawrence, Biomedical Sciences - 3rd PLACE

All About Fats--But Not Another Diet

Susan Locklin, Linguistics - FINALIST

Demetrius Maxey, Petroleum Engineering

Reducing Methane Greenhouse Gas

Amanda Moreno, Music Education - FINALIST

Body Mapping: A GPS for Musicians

Christian Nairy, Atmospheric Science

Observations of Chain Aggregates in Florida Cirrus Cloud Anvils

Smruthi Rudraraju, Biomedical Sciences

The Future of Chemo

Paul Schell, Music

Convergent Scales

Max Seippel, Communication

Let's Talk About Porn

Miranda Shanks, Geology - FINALIST

Finding the Oldest Ice on Earth

Nicholas Smith, Clinical and Translational Science

Allergy, Behavior, and Cytokines: How Food and Immunity Affect How We Feel

Niroop Sugunaraj, Electrical Engineering - FINALIST

Securing Communications for Small Scale Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS)

Trevor Taylor, Chemical Engineering

Future of Water Resources

Tanya Trotter, Nursing

Stroke Survivors' and Caregivers' Perception of Depressive Symptoms after Stroke

2020 ( Open this section)

  • Loren Been, Music
  • Marie Bergelin, Geology/Geological Engineering - 2ND PLACE
  • Brittney Christy, English -  FINALIST
  • Andrew Kohler, Chemical Engineering - FINALIST
  • Kaela Lucke, Atmospheric Sciences
  • Anjo Mate, Civil Engineering
  • Robeam Melaku, Civil Engineering
  • Joshua Oluwayomi, Petroleum Engineering - FINALIST
  • Edirisuriya Siriwardane, Physics/Astrophysics - FINALIST
  • Melissa Sisson, Biology
  • Mona Sohrabi Thompson, Biomedical Sciences - 1ST PLACE & PEOPLE'S CHOICE
  • Xincheng Wan, Petroleum Engineering
  • Jeffrey Widner, Social Work

2019 ( Open this section)

  • Adedoyin Adeyilola, Geology/Geological Engineering.
  • Karthik Balaji, Petroleum Engineering
  • Marie Bergelin, Geology/Geological Engineering
  • Jeremy Lewis, Chemical Engineering.
  • Johannes Van der Watt, Chemical Engineering.
  • Furkan Altincicek, Physics/Astrophysics
  • Sayantani Ghosh Dastidar, Biomedical Sciences
  • Pragalv Karki, Physics/Astrophysics
  • Natalie Midzak, Atmospheric Sciences - 2ND PLACE
  • Brian Teske, Aerospace Sciences
  • Srikanth Vijjamarri, Chemistry
  • Mark Williamson, Biology - 1ST PLACE & PEOPLE'S CHOICE
  • Olga Abramova, English
  • Zsofia Barandi, Accounting
  • Renee Colsch, Nursing
  • Emily Dougherty, Higher Education
  • Jeremy O’Keefe, Physical Therapy
  • Haseon Park, Communication
  • Debra Radi, Higher Education
  • Kristina Syversen, Education Foundations & Research.
  • Ian Watson, Public Health

2018 ( Open this section)

  • Peter Brandt, Geography
  • Lauren Clarke, Chemical Engineering - FINALIST
  • Ian Foerster, Chemical Engineering - 1ST PLACE & PEOPLE'S CHOICE
  • Peter Halcrow, Biomedical Sciences
  • Catherine Kohs, English
  • Ning Li, Earth Systems Science and Policy
  • Chris Mark, Experimental Psychology - FINALIST
  • Ryan Menath, History - 2ND PLACE
  • Kayla Michelson, Biology
  • Intisar Rizwanihaque, Biomedical Engineering
  • Afshin Shabani, Earth Systems Science and Policy
  • Muneer Shaik, Chemistry
  • Madina Sultanova, Physics and Astrophysics - FINALIST
  • Trevor Waagen, Counseling program - FINALIST
  • Susanne Watts, History
  • Paul Wren, Space Studies - FINALIST
  • Jin Zhang, Geology and Geological Engineering - FINALIST

2017 ( Open this section)

  • David Apostal, Computer Science
  • Kristen Black, Biology
  • Carolyn Broner, Special Education
  • Nick Cilz, Biomedical Sciences
  • Lauren Clark, Chemical Engineering
  • Sara Faraji Jalal Apostal, Computer Science
  • Matt Fuka, Mechanical Engineering
  • Brooke Hagenhoff, Atmospheric Sciences
  • Laurie Johansen, Nursing
  • Ted Krmpotich, Clinical Psychology
  • Rain Li, Chemistry
  • Kouqi Liu, Petroleum Engineering
  • Kavya Manyapu, Space Studies
  • Sean McCloat, Space Studies
  • Talus McCowan, Biomedical Sciences
  • Riley McGlynn, Biology
  • Adnan Quadri, Electrical Engineering
  • Mohsen Riahimanesh, Electrical Engineering
  • Roy Roach, Higher Ed
  • Charles Schneider, Biomedical Engineering
  • Reem Shadid,Biomedical Engineering
  • Bahareh Shoghli, Civil Engineering
  • Bridget Tetteh-Batsa, English
  • Hannes van der Watt, Chemical Engineering

Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is proudly co-sponsored by UND School of Graduate Studies and the Division of Research & Economic Development. 3MT® is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland.

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Three Minute Thesis header

The Three Minute Thesis Competition  

An 80,000 word ph.d. thesis would take 9 hours to present. their time limit...3 minutes. special thanks to our sponsor riverstone for supporting this event.  .

The 2024 3MT Competition is taking place in February and April! Thirty applicants will be selected to compete. Applications are now closed.

3MT Overview

Three Minute Thesis (3MT ® ) celebrates the exciting research conducted by PhD students around the world. Developed by  The University of Queensland (UQ) , the competition cultivates students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills. Presenting in a 3MT competition increases their capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes , in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience. Competitors are allowed one PowerPoint slide , but no other resources or props.

The 8 th  annual 3MT competition took place in March 2023. We had 32 students compete and witnessed some fantastic presentations. We can't wait to see what our new and returning participants bring in 2024. To help students prepare for the 3MT we offer a workshop series that will guide students through the whole process-- developing the talk, creating the slide, and practicing the presentation. view all the 2023 preliminary and final round presentations

Past Participants

The UNH Graduate School Media Channel hosts videos of the 3MT competitions from every year! Browse the channel at the link below to find 3MT presentations from participants across a range of disciplines and subjects. You can find direct links to the videos of our award winners from each year in the "Past 3MT Winners" section on this webpage as well.

UNH Graduate School Media Page Official 3MT Website

2023 3MT Winners

Melanie Smith First Place

2024 3MT Competition Schedule

Preliminary Round 1 - February 27th from 3-5pm, MUB Theater I Preliminary Round 2 - February 28th from 3-5pm, MUB Theater I 3MT Final Round - April 8th from 4-6pm, MUB Theater II (followed by a reception from 6-7pm)

Preparing for your 3MT

Upcoming workshop open to all UNH graduate students and postdocs

Introduction to the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Come for an overview of what the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition is and what makes a good 3MT, from content to audience to the way you present your research, orally and visually. Attendance can be in-person or virtual. 

When : December 13, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Where : Hamel Recreation Center room 107C or via Zoom

Register here

Past 3MT Winners

  • 1 st place: Melanie Smith ,  Master's Student in Marine Biology
  • 2 nd place: Manjot Rekhi , PhD Student in Earth and Environmental Science
  • 3 rd place: Diana Reyes Gomez , PhD Student in Agricultural Sciences
  • People's Choice Award: Ava Boutilier , Master's Student in Biochemistry
  • 1 st place: Sathya Jagadeesan ,  PhD student in Chemical Engineering
  • 2 nd place:  Nikolai Matukhno , Master's Student in Mechanical Engineering
  • 3 rd place & People’s Choice Award:  Nick Pollak , PhD candidate in Chemistry
  • 1 st place: David Heit , Msc Wildlife and Conservation Biology
  • 2 nd place: Via D'Agostino , MFA Fiction Writing
  • 3 rd place: Hannah Lightcap , PhD Psychology
  • People’s Choice Award: Jess Flarity , PhD English Literature
  • 1 st place: Jordan Pierce , MS Oceanography
  • 2 nd place: Allison Giannotti , PhD Composition & Rhetoric
  • 3 rd place: Isaiah Paolo Atienza Lee , PhD Molecular and Evolutionary Systems Biology
  • People’s Choice Award: Danial Mirzaiyanrajeh , PhD Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • People’s Choice Runner Up: Kerry Dykens , MS Oceanography
  • 1 st place: Sidney Birch , PhD Molecular & Evolutionary Systems Biology
  • 2 nd place & People’s Choice Award: Zane Relethford , PhD Chemistry
  • 3 rd place: Katherine Ineson , PhD NRESS
  • 1 st place: Jovana Milosavljevic Ardeljan , PhD Education
  • 2 nd place: Devon O'Rourke , PhD Molecular and Evolution Systems Biology
  • 3 rd place & People’s Choice Award: Kaitlyn Belknap , M.S. Genetics
  • 1 st place: Drummond Biles , PhD, Mechanical Engineering
  • 2 nd place: Meagan Wengrove , PhD Ocean Engineering
  • 3 rd place: Ryan Stevens , PhD Natural resources
  • People’s Choice Award: Rev. Holland Prior , MFA Creative Nonfiction
  • People’s Choice Runner Up: Jovana Milosavljevic Ardeljan , PhD Education
  • 1 st place & People’s Choice Award: Lesley Atwood , PhD Agroecology
  • 2 nd place: Susan Deily Swearingen , PhD History
  • 3 rd place: Maria Marin Jarrin , PhD Oceanography
  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted. No slide transitions, animations, or "movement" of any description are allowed. The slide is to be presented from the beginning of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g., sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g., costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment, etc.) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (e.g., no poems, raps or songs).
  • Presentations are to commence from the front of the theater.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through either movement or speech.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

Judging Criteria

3 Minute Thesis presentations are judged using the following criteria:

Comprehension and Content

  • Did the presentation provide an understanding of the background to the research question being addressed and its significance?
  • Did the presentation clearly describe the key results of the research including conclusions and outcomes?
  • Did the presentation follow a clear and logical sequence?
  • Was the thesis topic, key results and research significance and outcomes communicated in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience?
  • Did the speaker avoid scientific jargon, explain terminology and provide adequate background information to illustrate points?
  • Did the presenter spend adequate time on each element of their presentation - or did they elaborate for too long on one aspect so that other aspects of the presentation felt rushed?

Engagement and Communication

  • Did the oration make the audience want to know more?
  • Was the presenter careful not to trivialize or generalize their research?
  • Did the presenter convey enthusiasm for their research?
  • Did the presenter capture and maintain their audience's attention?
  • Did the speaker have sufficient stage presence, eye contact and vocal range; maintain a steady pace, and have a confident stance?
  • Did the PowerPoint slide enhance the presentation - was it clear, legible, and concise?

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Nevada Today

2024 three-minute thesis competition finalists announced, graduate students will compete in the final event on april 11.

Seven people stand on a stage holding large checks and smiling.

2023 3MT winners from left to right: Keely Rodriguez, Kendra Isable, Candi Block, Isabel Penaloza, Fatema Azmee, Yu Rong and Justice Best.

The buzz is back with the Graduate School’s annual Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition this spring! Earlier this month, 42 graduate students rocked the stage in front of a live audience all vying for a chance to advance to the final round and win cash prizes.

A panel of esteemed University faculty and postdocs had the challenging task of judging this year’s preliminary event, evaluating students’ presentation skills and research content. If you are unfamiliar with 3MT, it is an annual spectacle where master’s and doctoral students are tasked with condensing their research into a lightning-fast, three-minute presentation with only a single slide. It is an adrenaline-fueled sprint through the world of academia!

Since 2015, the Graduate School has hosted this event, showcasing the power, beauty and brilliance of graduate education at the University. In addition, recent winners of this competition have gone on to compete, and place, in regional 3MT competitions putting the University on the map as a hotbed of intellectual prowess.

We are thrilled to announce this year’s 16 finalists (see below) and cannot wait for the final showdown. The 3MT final round of competition is set to take place on Thursday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in the Wells Fargo Auditorium at the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center. Students, family, faculty and community members are invited to join us and witness firsthand the awe-inspiring brilliance of our scholars. For those who cannot attend in person, the event will be live-streamed via Zoom so please register here on Formstack to receive the information.

Congratulations to the 2024 3MT finalists! Good luck on April 11.

(The finalists below are listed alphabetically by last name.)

Master’s Category:

  • M.A. Criminal Justice 
  • "What do our phones teach us about incarceration? A social media content analysis"
  • M.S. Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology
  • “Sustaining the beating heart of Cambodia: Fisheries management in southeast Asia's largest lake”
  • “Zeroing in on gun violence”
  • M.S. Biochemistry
  • “May the pericytes be with you: Transport engineers you never knew existed!”
  • M.S. Chemistry
  • “Chemically recyclable dithioacetal polymers”
  • M.A. History
  • “Pushed to the limit: How the 1998 China floods revolutionized the relationship between China and the natural world”
  • M.S. Teaching History (M.A.T.H.)
  • “Dust in the wind dude: The Owens Valley everywhere except, in the Owens Valley”
  • “Winterfat restoration in a changing climate”  

Doctoral Category:

  • Ph.D. History
  • “Creating the Enemy: The origins of the inter-American Cold War in the 1940s”
  • Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering
  • “Electrifying the fight-or-flight response: Nanosecond electric pulses for neuromodulation “
  • Ph.D. Education - Literacy Studies
  • “P re-service teachers experiences teaching K-8 Multilingual Students' (MLS) writing”
  • Ph.D. Clinical Psychology
  • “Identifying predictors of racial trauma to inform treatment development “
  • Ph.D. Cell and Molecular Biology
  • “Lighting the way: Tools to prepare for future pandemics”
  • Ph.D. Education - Equity, Diversity and Language
  • “Bridging the gaps: Evaluating the intervention programs to overcome academic disparities”
  • Ph.D. Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • “Accelerating bridge construction connections behavior during near fault motions”
  • Ph.D. Political Science
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Research & Innovation

Senators Rosen, Cortez Masto worked with University President Brian Sandoval to secure more than $4 million for research programs at the University of Nevada, Reno

The funding will support research initiatives across the state

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Start-up company Atlas Magnetics ‘graduates’ from University, moves to larger facility

Expecting to make $30M+ of revenue in 2025, modern electronics company sees big growth within two years with equipment, space, other resources supported through NCAR

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NSF CAREER Award recipient Jihwan Yoon is developing device prototype to help patients with mental health conditions

Yoon is creating more accessible neurological treatment options

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University of Nevada, Reno and Arizona State University awarded grant to study future of biosecurity

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Registration now open for more than 20 camps to be held on campus June and July

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A recap of success in innovation

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TEDxReno: Spreading ideas, inspiring action, and building community

The independently organized event is on April 6 in Lawlor Events Center and offers $25 tickets for students

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  • 3MT (3 Minute Thesis)

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3 Minute Thesis Competition

Three Minute Thesis   (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by   The University of Queensland   (UQ). Graduate students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance. 3MT is not an exercise in trivializing or “dumbing down” research, but rather challenges students to consolidate their ideas and research discoveries to present concisely to a non-specialist audience. 

Whether you're trying to raise capital, cold call or network, it's essential to have an elevator pitch, especially when describing your research. 3MT® is a competition that helps graduate students develop their verbal communication skills and helps all people understand the importance of research and how it positively affects our lives. Students, you have 3 minutes to content, clarity, and cash. Ready, set, go…

3MT® is a competition that challenges graduate students to present a compelling verbal presentation of their thesis /dissertation topic and its significance in just three minutes. 3MT® develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills and supports the development of graduate students' capacity to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to a public audience.

3MT® is not an exercise in trivializing or ‘dumbing-down' research but forces students to consolidate their ideas and crystalize their research discoveries.

Students compete by presenting their thesis/dissertation topic in three minutes or less. Competitions are judged by a panel comprised of a diverse group of professionals (academic and non-academic) with a wide range of expertise.   Watch 3MT Showcase.  

Watch Sam Houston's own, Dr. Erica Pasquini, People's Choice award winning 3MT  presentation   at the University of Southern Mississippi.

By competing in the 3MT® competition at Sam Houston State University, graduate students have the opportunity to sharpen their communication skills, promote their field of research to the campus and the general public, and help all people understand the importance of research and how it positively impacts their lives.

The winners will be awarded cash prizes from the Graduate School and graduation regalia credit (full master's coverage or master's credit towards doctoral) courtesy of the Vice President for Student Affairs Office.

  • Grand Champion: $1,000 and credit towards graduation regalia
  • Runner Up: $750 and   credit towards   graduation regalia
  • People's Choice Award: $500 and   credit towards  graduation regalia
  • The top twelve finalists will receive $100 courtesy of the Vice President for Student Affairs Office.

* Prize money greater than $100 will post to the student’s SHSU account in the form of a scholarship. If the student has an outstanding balance, the scholarship will be applied towards that balance. Any remaining funds from the scholarship will then be credited to the student’s billing account.

The Graduate and Professional School at Sam Houston State University is excited for the upcoming 2024 3 Minute Thesis Competition. There will two preliminary rounds. The final round will be on the Huntsville campus on April 1, 2024. The top participants and one people's choice winner from each event will advance to the finals dependent upon final participant numbers.

Important Dates:

Must be registered by: January 31, 2024

Preliminary 1: February 19, 2024 @ The Woodlands Center Preliminary 2: February 20, 2024 @ Huntsville Campus - College of Business Haney Auditorium

2024 3MT Finals

April 1, 2024- Huntsville Campus - College of Business Haney Auditorium

For any questions send an email to [email protected]   

Virtual Competition Rules:

• presentations are limited to 3 minutes and competitors exceeding 3 minutes will be disqualified. • presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts their presentation through speech (timing does not include the 3mt title slide and commences from when the competitor starts speaking, not the start of the video). videos must meet the following criteria: • filmed on the horizontal • filmed on a plain background • filmed from a static position • filmed from one camera angle • contain a 3mt title slide • contain a 3mt powerpoint slide (top right corner/right side/cut to) • a single static slide is permitted in the presentation (no slide transitions, animations or ‘movement’ of any description). this can be visible continuously, or ‘cut to’ (as many times as you like) for a maximum of 1 minute or submitted via email if not included in the presentation. • the 3 minute audio must be continuous – no sound edits or breaks. • no additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment and animated backgrounds) are permitted within the recording. • presentations are to be spoken word (e.g. no poems, raps or songs). • no additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted within the video recording. • the decision of the adjudicating panel is final. • submissions via video format (only video link provided to event coordinators). files sent in other formats will not be accepted. please note: competitors *will not* be judged on video/ recording quality or editing capabilities (optional inclusions). judging will focus on the presentation, ability to communicate research to a non-specialist audience, and 3mt powerpoint slide., in person competition rules.

  • A single static PowerPoint slide is permitted. No slide transitions, animations or 'movement' of any description are allowed. The slide will be presented from the beginning of the oration.
  • No additional electronic media (e.g. sound and video files) are permitted.
  • No additional props (e.g. costumes, musical instruments, laboratory equipment) are permitted.
  • Presentations are limited to 3 minutes maximum and competitors exceeding 3 minutes are disqualified.
  • Presentations are to be spoken word (eg. no poems, raps or songs).
  • Presentations are to commence from the stage.
  • Presentations are considered to have commenced when a presenter starts his or her presentation through either movement or speech.
  • The decision of the adjudicating panel is final.

Once a student begins his or her presentation, the clock begins to run. The timekeeper will hold up a warning sign. A bell chimes at the end of the 3-minute period. If a competitor continues to speak after the bell chimes, he or she is disqualified from the competition.

Eligibility

  • Student must be enrolled in master's or doctoral level classes for the semester of competition.
  • Working on major project, capstone, thesis or dissertation research with some preliminary data complete
  • Did the oration make the audience want to know more?
  • Was the presenter careful not to trivialize or generalize their research?
  • Did the presenter convey enthusiasm for their research?
  • Did the presenter capture and maintain their audience's attention?
  • Did the speaker have sufficient stage presence, eye contact and vocal range; maintain a steady pace, and have a confident stance?
  • Did the PowerPoint slide enhance the presentation - was it clear, legible, and concise?
  • Did the presentation provide an understanding of the background to the research question being addressed and its significance?
  • Did the presentation clearly describe the key results of the research including conclusions and outcomes?
  • Did the presentation follow a clear and logical sequence?
  • Was the thesis topic, key results and research significance and outcomes communicated in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience?
  • Did the speaker avoid scientific jargon, explain terminology and provide adequate background information to illustrate points?
  • Did the presenter spend adequate time on each element of their presentation - or did they elaborate for too long on one aspect or was the presentation rushed?

– Please note: The judging panel will not judge the presentation based on the video/recording quality or editing capabilities (optional inclusions). Judging will focus on the presentation, ability to communicate re-search to a non-specialist audience, and 3MT PowerPoint slide. – People’s Choice element - number of votes received (via link survey on The Graduate School website). – Winners announced online and via social media and will be notified via email.

  • Guide to the 3MT
  • Preparing_Your_3MT_Presentation

All information sessions are listed below. If you were not able to attend one then contact Ricky Saiz at [email protected] who will schedule a special session for your group. Last day to sign up for the 3MT competition is January 31st and all information sessions must be completed prior to this date. An information session is not required in order to compete as long as the student and faculty sponsor feel comfortable about competing. 

2024 Information Sessions 

October 19, 2024 @ 6pm via Zoom

October 20, 2024 @ 6pm via Zoom

October 26, 2024 @ 6pm via Zoom

November 1, 2024 @ 6pm via Zoom

November 8, 2024 @ 5:30pm In-Person

Spring 2024 practice sessions will be scheduled after registration has closed. All sessions will be scheduled once a coach is assigned. If a student chooses their faculty as a coach, then scheduling will be between the student and faculty sponsor. 

3 Minute Thesis Presentations

3MT Winner 2023

Winners will be announced at The Graduate and Professional School 2023 Spring Awards Banquet

Grand Champion Damilola Oladimeji

Runner Up Jennifer Snedeker

People's Choice Razaq Jinad

  • 2023 Finalists Sarah Vickery Kristina Block Razaq Jinad Holly Moore Taylor Robinson Sarah Hernandez AE Fonsworth Jennifer Snedeker Kushi Gupta Damilola Oladimeji
  • Preliminary Presenters & Presentations Cesar Cantu Cesar I. Garza Sanchez Damilola Olademji Holly Moore Jared Estevanes Jennifer Snedeker Kristina Block Taylor Robinson Aileen "AE" Fonsworth Destiny Little Razaq Jinad Khushi Gupta Kiara Osbourne-Willis Liza Allen Sarah Vickery Sarah Hernandez Seth Castillo

Spring 2023 Prelims

Woodlands Prelim

Graduate Education

Office of graduate and postdoctoral education, 12 grad students named as finalists for 2024 three minute thesis competition.

3mt thesis

Mar 26, 2024

After six intense preliminary rounds, twelve exceptional scholars have emerged from a pool of 65 talented candidates, earning their place as finalists in Georgia Tech's highly anticipated annual Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition. On Friday, April 5, 2024, these finalists will hit the stage, harnessing their research expertise, to deliver compelling presentations in a three-minute format.

Congratulations to the following twelve finalists:

Karina Bhattacharya MID Industrial Design 

Vinodhini Comandur, Ph.D. Aerospace Engineering 

Mo Jarin, Ph.D. Environmental Engineering 

Anamik Jhunjhunwala, Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering 

Valeria Juarez, Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering 

Alexandra Patterson, Ph.D. Bioengineering 

Jeffrey Pattison, Ph.D. Aerospace Engineering 

Kantwon Rogers, Ph.D. Computer Science 

Mallika Senthil, MS Biomedical Engineering 

Wenting Shi, Ph.D. Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Shreyas Srivathsan, Ph.D. Aerospace Engineering 

Raghav Tandon, Ph.D. Machine Learning 

This year’s 3MT competition takes place on Friday, April 5, 2024, at 5:30 p.m. in the Atlantic Theater in the John Lewis Student Center. The entire Georgia Tech community is encouraged to attend the competition, which occurs as the finale of the 2024 Grad Student Appreciation Week. 3MT will also be streamed online and can be viewed at https://gatech.zoom.us/j/98696536715 .  Audience members and online viewers can vote for their favorite presenter to win the People’s Choice Award.  

Ph.D. winners can win up to $2,000 in research travel grants. The master's winner will receive a $1,000 research travel grant.   

Tech’s 3MT competition is coordinated by the Office of Graduate Education in partnership with the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL), The Naugle Communications Center, and the Language Institute.  

For more information, visit grad.gatech.edu/3mt . 

Brittani Hill | Marketing and Communications Manager 

Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Education 

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Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition for graduate students: April 9, 2024

Come out and support your fellow graduate students in the 3MT Competition on Tuesday, April 9, 2024 from 9a.m. to 4p.m. in Alumni Auditorium, CAW student centre:

The Three-minute Thesis (3MT®) is a skills development activity which challenges graduate students to present their research and its wider impact to a non-specialist audience in just three minutes using only one slide.

UWindsor graduate students will compete in the UWindsor competition, to be held on April 9, 2024 in Alumni Auditorium, 2nd floor of CAW student centre, with two heats held in the morning and the finals held later in the afternoon at 3p.m.. 

The winner will go on to represent the University of Windsor at the provincial final to be held at the Lakehead University campus in Orillia on May 8, 2024.

For more information visit the  UWindsor competition webpage .

— Published on Apr 4th, 2024

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PGR Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition Deadline – 2pm, Monday, 8 April

Three Minute Thesis

The Three-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition was developed by the  University of  Queensland  to celebrate the exciting research conducted by doctoral research students. ​

Since the inaugural event at the University of Queensland in 2008 the popularity of the competition has reached global heights with 900 universities holding events across 85 countries.​

In 2024, The Academy will host the competition to decide who will represent the University of Liverpool at the national 3MT® competition run by  Vitae .​ The deadline to submit your 3MT® entry for the Faculty Heats is 2pm on Monday 8 th April 2024. The first ten submissions will each receive a prize of Presentation Clickers. The Registration Form is available by clicking here .

It is increasingly important to be able to communicate your research in an accessible and succinct style suitable for a range of audiences. The 3MT® is a fantastic way to develop these presentation and public-engagement skills whilst also competing for prizes and the prestige of becoming a 3MT® winner.

You can find out more about the competition rules, eligibility requirements and the entry process for the University of Liverpool 3MT® Competition 2024 by visiting this page . Here you will find a link to the recent online introductory session, delivered by The Academy Researcher Development team. You can read about the experience of last year’s winner in this blogpost

An online drop-in is scheduled for 3 rd April from 2pm-3pm . This is to offer practical help and support in submitting your application. No booking is required and a Zoom link to join the session is available on Canvas.

Further events and information

Starting Postgraduate Research events:

There are three online faculty forums coming up for PGRs who have recently started their PGR programmes. These sessions are tailored by Faculty and provide an opportunity, for those who are in the first year of their postgraduate research programme, to understand the typical structure of a postgraduate programme identifying what to expect and how to deal with challenges, consider different approaches to planning their research and to identify key relationships.

An experienced academic colleague from the Faculty will be in attendance to answer questions. Dates and booking links are as follows:

  • 15 th April, 2pm, Starting Postgraduate Research in Humanities and Social Sciences
  • 17 th April, 2pm, Starting Postgraduate Research in Health and Life Sciences
  • 18 th April, 10am, Starting Postgraduate Research in Sciences and Engineering

You may also be interested in our upcoming Introduction to Public Engagement workshop. This will be facilitated by Laura Winters, who is the Public Engagement Officer for the Faculty of Health of Life Sciences. This session is aimed at people who are new to public engagement and will include:

  • An introduction to public engagement and why it’s important
  • An overview of all the key things you need to think about in order to create a successful public engagement activity
  • Examples of activities and events that have been run in the past
  • Opportunities to get involved in public engagement here at UoL

Details for how to book on are available here:

  • 18 th April, 2pm, Introduction to Public Engagement

The Academy’s Researcher Development and Culture Team is committed to offering support for all researchers, academics, research-enabling staff and postgraduate researchers at all career levels, providing opportunities and developing initiatives that meet their career aspirations. Colleagues are encouraged to regularly access the  Researcher Hub  for a range of on-demand development opportunities to support professional practice, supplementing the live  upcoming researcher development activities

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Graduate Students Compete at 3MT - Elmore Family School of Electrical and Computer Engineering - Purdue University

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SFU Education Heat 2023 Results

The Faculty of Education's Graduate Studies is delighted to announce the results of the  2024 3MT: Faculty of Education Heat  competition! 

We would like to express our gratitude to Dr. Jeannie Kerr who served as the MC and to Drs. Pooja Dharamshi ,  Ana Maria Navas Iannini and Cristiano Moura  for their challenging work in ranking the participants based on specific criteria. We also wish to thank the audience for their participation in selecting the recipient of the People's Choice award!

Congratulations to Emmeline Hoogland and Olessya Akimenko who will be representing the Faculty in the  3MT SFU Finals ! The finals will take place online and in-person at the Big Data Hub (ASB 10900) on April 4 from 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM.  

3mt thesis

First Place Winner:  Emmeline Hoogland Program:   PhD, Educational Technology and Learning Design Supervisor: Dr. Engida Gebre

Topic:  Family portraits from bud to bloom: (Hidden) dimensions of teenagers’ flowering relationship with Nature

"Coming from a Science Education and Communication background, it is useful to consider presenting something as complex as your research engagingly and understandably! It makes you think about what elements of your research are relevant and interesting to a broader audience. I wasn’t sure I could participate at first, as I haven’t started collecting data yet, but I am very happy I could." 

"One of my favourite moments of the Heat was when we had some time to talk when the jury was deliberating – as everyone there now knows a bit about your research. It was an honour to be both the winner and the people’s choice, as it felt like I could connect with the audience and the judges. For anyone thinking about participating in the future – just go for it and don’t overthink it! Even if you don’t want to participate, try and see if you can explain your research in 3 minutes or less – it makes talking to family and friends easier!"

Alex Vanderveen

Runner-Up:  Olessya Akimenko Program:  PhD, Languages, Cultures & Literacies Supervisor: Dr. Ena Lee

Topic:  Discourses of EAL Teacher Identity: Stakeholder Perceptions in Canada

"I wasn't sure how I could condense my substantial doctoral study into just 3 minutes, but I'm thrilled to have succeeded in this challenging task. Being chosen as the runner-up is a great honour, considering the excellent presentations by others."

"My advice for future participants is to present as if speaking to a general audience. Make your talk interesting and understandable by simplifying it or adding humour and pop culture references. The 3MT competition not only helps you make your study accessible to all but also reignites your passion by offering a fresh perspective."

We would also like to congratulate and acknowledge the rest of the competitors for their impressive presentations as well.

Michael Ford

Competitor:  Aylar Nash Program:   PhD, Educational Psychology Supervisors:  Dr. Lucy LeMare and Dr. Elina Birmingham

Topic:  User Experience Research in Canvas

Linda Rohr

Competitor:  Massoumeh (Massi) Khaleghi Saraghein Program:   PhD, Langues, cultures et littératies (En Francais) Supervisors:  Dr. Danièle Moore and Dr. Geneviève Brisson

Topic:  Teachers’ representation of their practices while using technology in classrooms: A multicase study in French as a second language classes in B.C., Canada

IMAGES

  1. Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

    3mt thesis

  2. PPT

    3mt thesis

  3. Three Minute Thesis Competition at W&M

    3mt thesis

  4. Designing a Winning 3MT Slide

    3mt thesis

  5. How to design an impactful 3MT slide (with examples!)

    3mt thesis

  6. 2019 IADR Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition Winner

    3mt thesis

VIDEO

  1. Three Minute Thesis

  2. 3 Minute Thesis (3MT) National Level 2023

  3. 3 Minutes Thesis UKM

  4. Three Minute Thesis Competition(3MT), Semi-Finals, AYSA. 2022

  5. 3 minutes Thesis (3MT)

  6. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition, Semi-finals, 2023, Asia-Pacific Young Scientists Association

COMMENTS

  1. Three Minute Thesis

    About 3MT. Hold a 3MT. 3MT Rebrand. Virtual 3MT. Live 3MT. UQ 3MT. Asia-Pacific 3MT. Watch 3MT. An 80,000 word PhD thesis would take 9 hours to present. Their time limit... 3 minutes. UQ acknowledges the Traditional Owners and their custodianship of the lands on which UQ is situated. — Reconciliation at UQ.

  2. Three Minute Thesis : Graduate School

    3MT is an annual competition sponsored by the Cornell Graduate School. 3MT challenges research-degree students to present a compelling story on their dissertation or thesis and its significance in just three minutes, in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience. All enrolled doctoral students at the research stage (with at least some ...

  3. 3MT® Competition

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. This event challenges graduate students to present a compelling speech about their research and its significance to non-academic persons in just three minutes using only one presentation image. 3MT ...

  4. 3MT (Three Minute Thesis)

    UCF's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition Three Minute Thesis (3MT) features master's and doctoral students communicating their research in just three minutes with only one PowerPoint slide. Participants are judged on the ability to effectively convey the importance of their research in an engaging way to a non-specialist audience. First developed in 2008 by the University […]

  5. Three Minute Thesis (3MT®)

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland. The competition develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills and supports the development of students' capacities to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to an intelligent but non-specialist audience.

  6. Three Minute Thesis Competition

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT™) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. The premise of the competition is to develop academic, presentation and research communication skills. It supports the development of students' capacities to effectively explain their research in language ...

  7. 3MT 2024 : Graduate School

    The 3MT competition was first held in 2008 at the University of Queensland and has since been adopted by over 900 universities in over 85 countries. 3MT challenges research degree students to present a compelling story on their dissertation or thesis and its significance in just three minutes, in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

  8. 3MT: Three Minute Thesis

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. While the original competition was for graduate students, a number of colleges are now sponsoring undergraduate competitions. 3MT offers seniors the opportunity to create an accessible and interesting ...

  9. Three Minute Thesis Competition

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition challenges students to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience. 3MT cultivates students' academic, presentation, and research communication skills. Currently enrolled master's and doctoral students who are actively engaged in ...

  10. Three Minute Thesis

    The Three Minute Thesis competition or 3MT, is an annual competition held in more than 200 universities worldwide. It is open to PhD students, and challenges participants to present their research in just 180 seconds, in an engaging form that can be understood by an intelligent audience with no background in the research area. This exercise ...

  11. 3MT 2023 : Graduate School

    The 3MT competition was first held in 2008 at the University of Queensland and has since been adopted by over 900 universities in over 85 countries. 3MT challenges research degree students to present a compelling story on their dissertation or thesis and its significance in just three minutes, in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience.

  12. Three Minute Thesis (3MT™)

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT™) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland, Australia. The exercise develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills and supports the development of students' capacities to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to an intelligent but non-specialist audience.

  13. How to write a winning 3MT script

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition is an annual public speaking competition, where PhD candidates describe the impact and scope of their research in 3 minutes to a non-specialist audience. It was launched by the University of Queensland in 2008 and has since gained traction in over 85 countries around the world! 🌍

  14. Penn Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a competition for doctoral and research students to develop and showcase their research communication skills through brief, 3-minute presentations. Penn's annual 3MT competition is sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for Education, with co-sponsorship and support from Career Services, the Graduate Student ...

  15. 3MT

    The 2023 3MT competition will be held at 11am on Thursday, March 21, 2024. The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is a research presentation competition that originated at the University of Queensland in 2008. Since then, the program has spread to universities worldwide.

  16. Start

    2024 3MT Competition. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an internationally recognized competition that challenges Ph.D students to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance in just 3 minutes, in language that anyone can understand. 3MT is not an exercise in trivializing or 'dumbing-down' research but requires students to consolidate their ideas, crystallize their ...

  17. 3MT (Three Minute Thesis) Competition

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition originally developed by The University of Queensland in 2008, and now has been widely adopted at universities around the world. The exercise challenges masters and doctoral students to present a compelling talk on their Thesis/Dissertation topic and its significance.

  18. 3MT Three Minute Thesis Competition

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland which challenges graduate students to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance in just three minutes in language appropriate to a non-specialist audience. Clemson University's Graduate Student Government and the Graduate School co-hosted Clemson's first 3MT ...

  19. 2023 3MT: Three Minute Thesis

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. While the original competition was for graduate students, a number of colleges are now sponsoring undergraduate competitions. The Writing Center sponsored Harvard's first undergraduate Three-Minute Thesis ...

  20. Three Minute Thesis

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an academic research communication competition developed by the University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. Through the competition, graduate and professional students can hone their academic and research presentation skills and their ability to effectively explain their research to a general audience.

  21. Three Minute Thesis (3MT)

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is proudly co-sponsored by UND School of Graduate Studies and the Division of Research & Economic Development. 3MT® is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland. We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. ...

  22. 3 Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT ®) celebrates the exciting research conducted by PhD students around the world.Developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), the competition cultivates students' academic, presentation, and research communication skills.Presenting in a 3MT competition increases their capacity to effectively explain their research in three minutes, in a language appropriate to a ...

  23. Three Minute Thesis

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an academic research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. This event challenges graduate students to present a compelling speech about their research and its significance to non-academic persons in just three minutes using only one presentation image. 3MT ...

  24. 2024 Three-Minute Thesis competition finalists announced

    The buzz is back with the Graduate School's annual Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition this spring! Earlier this month, 42 graduate students rocked the stage in front of a live audience all vying for a chance to advance to the final round and win cash prizes. A panel of esteemed University ...

  25. 3MT (3 Minute Thesis)

    Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ). Graduate students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance. 3MT is not an exercise in trivializing or "dumbing down" research, but rather challenges students to consolidate their ideas and research discoveries to present ...

  26. 12 Grad Students Named as Finalists for 2024 Three Minute Thesis

    After six intense preliminary rounds, twelve exceptional scholars have emerged from a pool of 65 talented candidates, earning their place as finalists in Georgia Tech's highly anticipated annual Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition. On Friday, April 5, 2024, these finalists will hit the stage, harnessing their research expertise, to deliver compelling presentations in a three-minute format.

  27. Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition for graduate students: April 9

    The Three-minute Thesis (3MT®) is a skills development activity which challenges graduate students to present their research and its wider impact to a non-specialist audience in just three minutes using only one slide. UWindsor graduate students will compete in the UWindsor competition, to be held on April 9, 2024 in Alumni Auditorium, 2nd ...

  28. PGR Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition Deadline

    The Three-Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition was developed by the University of Queensland to celebrate the exciting research conducted by doctoral research students. Since the inaugural event at the University of Queensland in 2008 the popularity of the competition has reached global heights with 900 universities holding events across 85 countries.

  29. Graduate Students Compete at 3MT

    The Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is a university-wide research communication competition hosted by the Graduate School. The competition develops academic, presentation, and research communication skills and supports the development of graduate students' capacities to effectively explain their research in language appropriate to an intelligent but non-specialist audience.

  30. Faculty of Education Heat Winners: 3 Minute Thesis

    The Faculty of Education's Graduate Studies is delighted to announce the results of the 2024 3MT: Faculty of Education Heat competition!. We would like to express our gratitude to Dr. Jeannie Kerr who served as the MC and to Drs. Pooja Dharamshi, Ana Maria Navas Iannini and Cristiano Moura for their challenging work in ranking the participants based on specific criteria.